Do you use food processors?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by broncoboxer, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Because I have no counter space to speak of, my FP lives on top of the fridge---along with the stand mixer and blender. When you have to move an appliance so radically, you make sure you actually need it.
     
  2. broncoboxer

    broncoboxer

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    To be honest: both.  It seems that I've read somewhere that your hand should straddle both the handle and part of the cutting blade.  Hence, that's what I've been attempting.  By the way, when I've dropped the knives it's been when I was pulling one out of the block and when I knocked one off the table accidentally with my elbow.  It's never been while I was cutting.

    All the same, I know I still need to practice.
     
  3. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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  4. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Good idea - thank you /img/vbsmilies/smilies//smile.gif   I remember that episode of I love Lucy - hilarious, as always /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
     
  5. tgrandlife

    tgrandlife

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    Hi, Marinus here,

    Sorry about your knives, there is another tread with the question, are chefs abusive, hope you are not in that catagory.

    I am a professional chef and also cook at home, I use my foodprocessor very regular and have mine for years, they are extremely handy, especially when you grind ingredients so you don't have to chop them e.g. onions, garlic,herbs and so on. I live in Malaysia and we use lots of grinded ingredients in the local cooking. What I do for example is buy cleaned garlic, (if you cannot find that, buy a kilo or so and peel it) now you grind in your processor and place the mix in a container, add vegetable oil (cornoil or sunfloweroil is fine) make sure the garlic is covered with oil, close the container and place it in your fridge or even freezer, it keeps for weeks and you don't have to peel a few cloves all the time. When you finish a batch use the balance oil for cooking as it has a nice garlic taste, so no waste

    I have a Philips brand with a high blender on one side and a bowlblender on the other, the high blender is also great for fruitjuices or smoothies. I use the high blender also a lot for pastes which I use as a base for curries and so on..   

    Panasonic or any of these electrical household brands all have good quality processors for home use.

    As far as your knives are concerned, I would advise to buy reasonable priced branded pieces there is a Swiss brand called Zwielingen they have twins as their logo, they last a lifetime at least with me they do.

    Good Luck and Happy Cooking
     
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Hi Marinus,

    You wrote:
    The "Swiss brand called Zwielingen" is actually not Swiss but located in Solingen, Germany.  Their brand is called Zwilling through most of the world, but is primarily known as "Henckels" in the US.  Here, Zwilling is J. A. Henckels' collection of their German made knives.  "Zwilling" means twin; and the Zwilling series have two little men holding hands screened on the blades as a marque. 

    So, those are your knives.  While they're among the most respected brands in the world, and good knives for the money, here they are fairly expensive.

    It's a funny old world, and some things just don't translate. 

    Similarly, I don't believe the Phillips food processors are available here.

    Regards,
    BDL
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2010
  7. phreon

    phreon

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    I've been pondering the same question this thread posts.  I have a blender, drop bowl KA mixer, and intend to get a hand blender for certain sauces, chilis, etc. I also have a food mill and hand crank grinder as well.  I've avoided getting a mandoline to force myself to use the knife as much as possible.  I figure I'd do bread, pastas, etc by hand or with the KA mixer. I've never made a Pesto or Hummus, but I'd like to. Would a food processor do an appreciably better job than any of the above appliances to justify the cost and counter space?  I take no issue in dicing a bunch of onions with a knife or shredding cheese with a hand grater.

    Sorry to hijack,

    Doug
     
  8. siduri

    siduri

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    Doug, i think given your tendencies, unless you have limitless counter space (and if you cook, there is never enough counter space, to my mind) and limitless funds, you don;t need the processor.  I make pesto and hummus in the blender.  It would be absurd to buy a processor for pesto. I make hummus, and even chicken liver mousse in the blender.  Yeah, a pain in the neck because you can only do a little at a time, but i make the liver mousse once a year and the hummus only once in a while and not in huge quantities.  So really, i can't justify the space it takes up. 
     
  9. foodpump

    foodpump

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    A lot of mixed feelings on FP's.

    At work I use it alot--but almost exclusively for ganaches and chopping nuts.

    At home I never use one.  I cook for only 5 or so people so it's never needed.

    Some might call me lazy, but I'd rather spend 30 seconds longer with a knife at the cutting board than a minute and half at the sink washing the darn thing.  Coleslaw for under 10 people?  Five minutes with a knife, and I'm still going to use that same knife and same cutting board for other veg prep.

    Besides, many of the smaller Fp's shred the ingredients directly into the bowl, so you have to stop, scoop out the ingredients into another bowl, put the lid back on, and continue.  For me, it's kinda like ordering a de-caf expresso.  The "intelligent" FP's shoot the shredded ingredients into whatever bowl you want to, and in the case of coleslaw, you're going to have to dress the cabbage anyway.

    Hate doing doughs in a FP.  Like I said, some might call me lazy, but I'd rather scrape out the dough with a plastic scraper or rubber spatula in a K.A bowl and be done with it in 20 seconds, than to spend a minute and half  to chase around bits of dough clinging on to the central column and blade--and sometimes the lid.

    Pates and terrines?  I do a pate en croute for high tea on a weekly basis.  Meat still has to be ground--you can't put 1" cubes of meat into FP and not expect to burn or shred the meat instead of grinding it.  Fish is another story, but with pork or poultry Uh-Uh, no go.  I do use a F.P. to "Finish" the farce, after it's been ground twice, I process it with half frozen cream or demi-- and as the English say, "it works a treat". 

    Hate the household FP's no matter how expensive they are.  Bowls are always plastic and it always fatigues/cracks after a year's worth of dishwashing. 
     
  10. phreon

    phreon

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    I understand the problem pureeing certain food items in the blender is that thick ones don't circulate well and therefore "grind" unevenly, if at all.  I'm thinking that a good hand/stick blender (Waring WSB33) might to a bang up job with items in a common stainless bowl.  If the food won't come to the blade, bring the blade to the food. Does this sound plausible? It's not like I'll be making gallons of hummus every day.

    Thanks,

    Doug
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2011
  11. siduri

    siduri

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    Glad to hear all that foodpump.  I never used one but imagine i would never use one - and for ganache - i just melt the chocolate with a little of the cream, then add the extra cream or i whip the rest of thne cream and add the melted and cooled mixture. 

    I HATE washing complex instruments with goopy stuff on them.  And the space question. 

    Pheron, i have a cheapo stick blender, so i can;t say.  I imagine a very strong one would work in humus, maybe (kind of doubt it) with liver mousse.  But the blender works (mine is a Braun). 
     
  12. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Pheron, stick blenders do not have a lot of clearance between the blade and the bottom of the guard. So, with chunky products, you have to do a lot of lift-and-press action until everything is fine enough to feed into the blade.

    For the occasional dip (i.e., hummus, baba ganoujh, etc.) I think I'd opt for one of the mini-food processors instead. You'll certainly find other uses for it as well.
     
  13. chutney

    chutney

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    I have Cuisinart at home.  I use it for special cooking times.  It lives in a drawer.  I wash it by hand or in the dishwasher, doesn't matter because I don't mind cleaning time at home.

    At work the Cuisinart gets used more that the cheap food processors.  I don't like cleaning them at work.  I would never sent it to the dishroom and the blades are against rules.  

    For making mirepoix at work I would use the robot-coupe.  Again, I don't like cleaning it[font=tahoma, verdana, geneva, lucida, arial, helvetica, sans-serif], But if I'm prepping for a party of 300, I use it.  We also have a buffalo chopper.  I think cooking is about using the simplest tool for the job.  [/font]

    Back to the OP.  If you are going to be expanding your cooking buy a cheap food processor and use it until your cooking skills exceed it or you wear it out.  Then think about buying a better one.

    Knife skills are well worth learning as is knowing when your knife is dull. Good luck.
     
  14. phreon

    phreon

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    A stick blender is a given for me, I have uses for one anyway.  I suppose I could get rid of the lousy steam pressurized espresso machine (somebody gave me) I haven't used in 5 years and store a flea market or ebay  FP in it's place.  Of course on eBay, there's a real danger from the "ooh, a Robot" factor.

    I do have a 1.5  mini food processor someone gave me that is only useful for chopping onions and such, but by the time I've peeled and prepped the onion, I can just finish the job with the already dirty knife much faster than hauling it out and cleaning the danged thing.

    Maybe I should just get a slap chop!

    Doug