Do you play a musical instrument?

2,260
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Joined Jun 16, 2007
How many musicians do we have here? I'm hyped right now about the trumpet my mom found at a garage sale and is sending me--a King 600 (not one of their top ones, but it is a King . . .) made in the '70's, in mint condition. I can hardly wait :roll:

I've played violin, French horn and trumpet, but it's been some years. I'm also really good at playing my Polk Audio/Onkyo sound system. That takes a lot of talent. How about the rest of you?
 
107
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Joined Jun 20, 2008
I play a lot if instruments. Mostly drums, guitar, piano, and bass, but if you'd like I can give you the full list. Drums were my first instrument. Started playing when I was seven.
 
2,260
15
Joined Jun 16, 2007
That's really great! I played violin for 9 years (4th-12th grade). I ended up pretty good at it. Not pro-level, of course. Years later I figured out why I had a hard time with some of the fingering and the vibrato--I just cannot keep my left elbow under the violin without a lot of effort. I don't bend that way.
 
107
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Joined Jun 20, 2008
violin is one thing i dont play that ive always wanted to learn. i just cant figure out how to not make it squeak
 
3,147
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Joined Jan 5, 2007
National instrument of Scotland :lol:
Although, to be honest, I haven't played for quite a few years - but I still have my pipes, just in case I ever get the urge to let rip!
 
84
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Joined May 22, 2009
While I played several instruments as a child (piano, flute, saxophone, guitar) I wasn't really good at any of them. Turns out, I've got a "right hand, left hand" problem (i.e., I can't do two different things with each hand). Took up singing at 40 and fell in love with the opera. Nothing like Puccini to put you in the mood for great italian food :)
 
2,518
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Joined Nov 20, 2000
I play bass and guitar. Right now I'm playing with Nik Entertainment in the wedding and party bands as you can see by the signature.

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1,730
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Joined Aug 18, 2007
I play acoustic guitar. Taught 2 sons and 1 brother to play. 1 son n 1 bro are way better now than i'll ever be. Im so proud (for proud, read jealous)
 
746
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Joined Jul 21, 2006
I played trombone in jr. high but didn't go very far. I started 3 years later than everyone else in the band so in the push to be ready for marching and concert seasons, I didn't actually learn to read the music. Not easy when it's time for a sight reading competition!

I dabbled with piano and keyboard. I took a couple of formal piano lessons in elementary school but the teacher wasn't dependable and after 2 lessons in 2 months, my parents pulled me out of the program. From the bit I tried to teach myself, I think I may have the same problem in using both hands at the same time to do different things as singer4660.
 
843
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Joined Oct 16, 2008
I grew up in a house full of musicians, my Dad played in the Miami Symphony Orchestra in the 60's, my mother was a piano teacher, my brother was a studio drummer and drum tech, my aunt plays guitar and was a concert classical guitarist. I tried like the devil to learn piano, guitar and violin but being ambidextrious I always had a problem with the L/R seperation and they wanted to do what the other did. Very frustrating since I have a better ear for music and tone than most of them. In my free time when I was younger I used to help out a local home and car audio shop with tuning the stereo installations.
 
7,676
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
I hear too much complaining about hand dexterity and independence. I only hear these excuses from students who don't want to put in the work required to learn an instrument past a certain level. What, you think pro musicians are just born with the ability to make each hand do something different than the other? Not a chance. Sorry, just calling 'em like I see 'em.
 
958
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Joined Aug 15, 2004
I started piano at 4, mostly classical. But only play 3 classics anymore and that is rare (Warsaw Concerto, Moonlight Sonata, Claire d'Lune).

But since my '40's, I acquired a 1935 National Duolian resonphonic guitar and learned slide blues. Since then I've played at several venues, although only got paid once! Also have a custom Martin dreadnought, modeled after a 1935 Martin, and a couple of National replicas (Style 0, Style W tri-cone).

Don't play them as much as I used to either, as I got arthritis in the fingers, and since chopping up my back cement porch about a month ago, my carpal tunnel as returned with a vengeance!

doc
 
84
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Joined May 22, 2009
While I would agree that professionals work really hard to get where they are, a certain amount of inate talent is required to be successful. This is true of any art from cooking to theater to music. Personally, I wasn't using the "right hand left hand" thing as an excuse, simply a realization that my brain doesn't work that way and this would make it very hard for me to ever be really good on an instrument that requires that specific ability. I took 9 years of piano lessons, practiced every day, and never got to be more than mediocre. I took 2 years of voice lessons and was hired professionally by the local regional opera. Big surprise, my inate talent is in my voice not my hands. What's interesting about the story (IMHO) is that it took so long for me to figure it out.
 
7,676
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
I wasn't trying to be accusatory, sorry if it came across like that. What I'm trying to stress is the opposite of what you'e saying... I don't believe that inate talent is as useful as you may think. I teach plenty of students that have little talent but put in a great effort and get to be very good. I also have students that have more talent in their pinky than all my other students combined but they're lazy as all heck and never amount to anything. Talent can be a motivation but it won't carry you to high ranks alone.

I started learning violin when I was 14. Most great violinist start learning right around the same time they start walking so I was a beginner amongst advanced students. By the end of high school a lot of those students dropped out of conservatory where as me... I was ready for more. I had a certain amount of talent but not nearly as much as other musicians i was and still am surrounded by. It was hard beyond hard and I spent hours locked up in a practice room (still do, that never ends).
 
958
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Joined Aug 15, 2004
Interesting about talent vs. hard work.

After playing slide delta blues for about 1 year, I played for a real honest-to-goodness real bluesman. When I got done, he exclaimed, "Well, sxxt man, I've been playin' blues for 55 years and I can't even play like that!".

And he promptly got up and walked off, and didn't speak to me again during the 3-day blues festival!

doc
 
31
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Joined Sep 16, 2009
I play a little guitar and keyboard, but mainly produce records and have some credits.
 
120
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Joined Mar 9, 2007
Like most kids from my generation, I suffered thru piano lessons. From there organ followed. Then came trumpet and coronet, mellowphone, sousaphone, and tuba. I've never been able to play any stringed instruments very well. Mary Had A Little Lamb is about the only song I can play on violin but it sounds like I'm playing the lamb instead of a violin. My big desire now is learning to play French horn.
 
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