Do you know what Chinese dish is it?

9
10
Joined Jun 15, 2015
Hi,

I have repeatedly had a 'spicy beef with rice', which was once called a soup by the Chinese cashier lady, at a local restaurant. It is so good that I would love to find a recipe for it.

From what I can see and taste (and obviously from the name of the dish) I know that it has pieces of beef in it, hot chillies (that look slightly burned), Soy Bean Sprouts, some dark mashrooms, rice noodles, Bok Choy  and a sauce. Also I have no idea what ingredient is the one ona spoon in a third image and I would really appreciate if anyone would tell me.

Furthermore, I have observed that when I got the dish freshly prepared the meat in the sauce is always on the top and all the other vegetable ingredients are on the bottom.

Kind regards




 
 
232
11
Joined Mar 10, 2015
Hi,

I have repeatedly had a 'spicy beef with rice', which was once called a soup by the Chinese cashier lady, at a local restaurant. It is so good that I would love to find a recipe for it.

From what I can see and taste (and obviously from the name of the dish) I know that it has pieces of beef in it, hot chillies (that look slightly burned), Soy Bean Sprouts, some dark mashrooms, rice noodles,Bok Choy and a sauce. Also I have no idea what ingredient is the one ona spoon in a third image and I would really appreciate if anyone would tell me.

Furthermore, I have observed that when I got the dish freshly prepared the meat in the sauce is always on the top and all the other vegetable ingredients are on the bottom.

Kind regards







 

Looks and sounds like beef pho, but I'm used to seeing it with fresh cilantro, basil, and rice noodles. The thing on the spoon to me just looks like a price of meat, but my screen is too small to say for sure.

I've never seen tripe before, but I know its used in a lot of popular beef soups. Are you sure it's not Vietnamese?
 
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phatch

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It doesn't look like Pho to me at all.

Beef and rice is not a common combination. Working from generalizations, you see more beef up north which more wheat noodle country, not rice. And you probable see more lamb than beef traditionally. For restaurants here in the US, they often substitute to beef and rice.  On those assumptions, I did some searching.

http://cookingsimplechinesefoodathome.com/2011/06/28-spicy-lamb-pot.html  

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1014430-chinese-braised-lamb-shanks

Substitute beef for the lamb. I'll dig into my cookbooks on the topic later and see what I find. 

Some interesting but not as close of hits.

http://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/chinese-clay-pot-beef

http://soyricefire.com/2012/11/11/c...e-ground-pork-and-hen-of-the-woods-mushrooms/
 
232
11
Joined Mar 10, 2015
G
It doesn't look like Pho to me at all.

Beef and rice is not a common combination. Working from generalizations, you see more beef up north which more wheat noodle country, not rice. And you probable see more lamb than beef traditionally. For restaurants here in the US, they often substitute to beef and rice.  On those assumptions, I did some searching.

http://cookingsimplechinesefoodathome.com/2011/06/28-spicy-lamb-pot.html  
http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1014430-chinese-braised-lamb-shanks

Substitute beef for the lamb. I'll dig into my cookbooks on the topic later and see what I find. 

Some interesting but not as close of hits.
http://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/chinese-clay-pot-beef
http://soyricefire.com/2012/11/11/c...e-ground-pork-and-hen-of-the-woods-mushrooms/
Good call, Phatch. Now that I can see it on a larger monitor, I don't think pho either anymore.
 
595
71
Joined Jun 28, 2010
Often, you can't really duplicate the taste of this kind of dishes. 

There is no recipe for it, and lot of times they use a stock that has been continuously cooked for many years non-stop, adding more ingredients and water everyday.

In the picture: 

Those are mung bean sprouts, not soy bean sprouts. No bok choy, that is napa cabbage. On the spoon that looks like fried tofu (soy) skin.

Black mushrooms probably dried shiitake muchrooms.

dcarch 
 
232
11
Joined Mar 10, 2015
Often, you can't really duplicate the taste of this kind of dishes. 

There is no recipe for it, and lot of times they use a stock that has been continuously cooked for many years non-stop, adding more ingredients and water everyday.

In the picture: 

Those are mung bean sprouts, not soy bean sprouts. No bok choy, that is napa cabbage. On the spoon that looks like fried tofu (soy) skin.

Black mushrooms probably dried shiitake muchrooms.

dcarch 

I second the dried shitake theory, but I still see Bok Choy. Also, the burnt stuff the poster sees may actually be deep fried onions and not chili. They use those here a lot in soup.

Could the sauce be hoisin? Now I really wanna know what the soup is too! Lol
 
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595
71
Joined Jun 28, 2010
I second the dried shitake theory, but I still see Bok Choy. Also, the burnt stuff the poster sees may actually be deep fried onions and not chili. They use those here a lot in soup.

Could the sauce be hoisin? Now I really wanna know what the soup is too! Lol
Onions are not commonly used in traditional Chinese cooking, almost never in soups.

If you Google image you will see that is exactly napa cabbage (yellow leaves) not bok choy (green leaves)

If you Google image Fried tufo skin, which is commonly used in soups, that is exactly what it is.

Hoisin is almost never used in that kind of recipes. Hoisin is mostly a BBQ sauce. 

The soup, what I said is basically a Chinese Master Stock very difficult to duplicate at home, which as WiKi explains:

"----The defining characteristic of a master stock from other stocks is that after initial use, it is not discarded or turned into a soup  or sauce. Instead, the broth is stored and reused in the future as a stock for more poachings sometimes for up to 100 years. With each use, the poached meats and other ingredients absorb the stock's flavour while imparting their own back into the stock. In this way, over time, flavour accumulates in the stock, making it richer and more complex with each poaching, while subsequent poached meats absorb this flavour and likewise become more flavourful.----"

dcarch
 
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232
11
Joined Mar 10, 2015
I
Onions are not commonly used in traditional Chinese cooking, almost never in soups.

If you Google image you will see that is exactly napa cabbage (yellow leaves) not bok choy (green leaves)

If you Google image Fried tufo skin, which is commonly used in soups, that is exactly what it is.

Hoisin is almost never used in that kind of recipes. Hoisin is mostly a BBQ sauce. 

The soup, what I said is basically a Chinese Master Stock very difficult to duplicate at home, which as WiKi explains:

"----The defining characteristic of a master stock from other stocks is that after initial use, it is not discarded or turned into a soup
 or sauce
. Instead, the broth is stored and reused in the future as a stock for more poachings sometimes for up to 100 years. With each use, the poached meats and other ingredients absorb the stock's flavour while imparting their own back into the stock. In this way, over time, flavour accumulates in the stock, making it richer and more complex with each poaching, while subsequent poached meats absorb this flavour and likewise become more flavourful.----"

dcarch

I was not disputing, rather trying to help the poster because I'm curious. It looks really tasty, and I would like some too! Please keep in mind that I'm Canadian, and here hoisin is offered for soups, (which I always pass on just as I would pass on BBQ sauce in chicken noodle soup,) and the napa cabbage labeled in my grocery store looks just like a wrinkled cabbage, and the bok choy looks like a large celery similar to the last pic. Never said it was traditional soup, but here the caramelized onions are very popular too, especially in Asian soups.
 
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595
71
Joined Jun 28, 2010
I
I was not disputing, rather trying to help the poster because I'm curious. It looks really tasty, and I would like some too! Please keep in mind that I'm Canadian, and here hoisin is offered for soups, (which I always pass on just as I would pass on BBQ sauce in chicken noodle soup,) and the napa cabbage labeled in my grocery store looks just like a wrinkled cabbage, and the bok choy looks like a large celery similar to the last pic. Never said it was traditional soup, but here the caramelized onions are very popular too, especially in Asian soups.
Not disputing either, just offer what I think I know, I can be wrong. It is a big world, anything is possible. 

I am 99% sure that is napa cabbage.

Chinese restaurants so not typically offer sauce for soups (just soy sauce on the table) Some soups come with red vinegar. Some people will ask for hot pepper sauce (similar to Sriracha).

Onions' common name in China is "Foreign scallion". When onions are used in dishes caramelization is not a common Chinese kitchen practice.

dcarch
 
232
11
Joined Mar 10, 2015
Not disputing either, just offer what I think I know, I can be wrong. It is a big world, anything is possible. 

I am 99% sure that is napa cabbage.

Chinese restaurants so not typically offer sauce for soups (just soy sauce on the table) Some soups come with red vinegar. Some people will ask for hot pepper sauce (similar to Sriracha).

Onions' common name in China is "Foreign scallion". When onions are used in dishes caramelization is not a common Chinese kitchen practice.

dcarch

You are more likely to be right than me. We tend to put odd condiments in Asian foods where I live. We also might label our imported produce wrong or get different variants of the same vegetable. Our napa looks like this but sometimes is deeper green
 
595
71
Joined Jun 28, 2010
45
11
Joined Jan 15, 2015
It looks like a thick soup.

I would think this might be something like this:

- Stir fry some chopped garlic and ginger until aromatic

- Add some beef stocks (or even chicken stocks)

- Add a bit of oyster sauce

- Season with salt and pepper (and sugar, perhaps)

- Then thicken with corn-starch

Probably that would be close :)

The only thing difficult would be the stocks!

Add sesame oil if you can taste that from the original.

Note, I can only imagine the recipe from the look of the photo :)

And from the first photo, I think the "green" one can be bok choy, that's common for dish like this. But, from the third photo, that's definitely napa cabbage.
 
9
10
Joined Jun 15, 2015
 
Often, you can't really duplicate the taste of this kind of dishes. 

There is no recipe for it, and lot of times they use a stock that has been continuously cooked for many years non-stop, adding more ingredients and water everyday.

In the picture: 

Those are mung bean sprouts, not soy bean sprouts. No bok choy, that is napa cabbage. On the spoon that looks like fried tofu (soy) skin.

Black mushrooms probably dried shiitake muchrooms.

dcarch 
I am 100% sure that this is a bok choy and not a napa cabbage as I know how both of tchem look and taste. Also thank you very much for telling me about the unknown ingredient that it is a fried tofu skin :D Although I am not sure about the mushrooms, shitake look quite round but the ones from that delicious hot pot are very thin and almost black.

Unfortunately the mushrooms aren't visible in any photo.

PS All the pictures show the same dish.
 
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9
10
Joined Jun 15, 2015
I second the dried shitake theory, but I still see Bok Choy. Also, the burnt stuff the poster sees may actually be deep fried onions and not chili. They use those here a lot in soup.

Could the sauce be hoisin? Now I really wanna know what the soup is too! Lol
This is a bak choy for sure :) However I can taste the chilli peppers and I can see them too, there is no onion in the dish. I supose the were flamed to enhance the taste.
 
9
10
Joined Jun 15, 2015
 
I am 100% sure that this is a bok choy and not a napa cabbage as I know how both of tchem look and taste. Also thank you very much for telling me about the unknown ingredient that it is a fried tofu skin :D Although I am not sure about the mushrooms, shitake look quite round but the ones from that delicious hot pot are very thin and almost black.

Unfortunately the mushrooms aren't visible in any photo.

PS All the pictures show the same dish.

They look similar to these...
 
595
71
Joined Jun 28, 2010
 

They look similar to these...
Those are called "cloud ears", a type of fungus, not really mushrooms.

No sorry, not trying to be stubborn. . Those are napa cabbage. Google Image cooked napa cabbage and see for yourself.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2686/4310398395_341ff639be.jpg

http://flavorexplosions.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/img_6451_1.jpg

There are two kinds of bok choy, neither one is shown in the picture.

http://www.babyrabies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/wonton2-1024x685.jpg

https://cookingwithali.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/img_1337.jpg

dcarch
 

phatch

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Staff member
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Joined Mar 29, 2002
I think it looks more beef like. It's too thick for tofu skin, the grain is too regular and the surface is more muscle fibrous than even like dried tofu.  At least the tofu skin I've encountered.

The lighting could be playing some tricks on things to. It seem more meat gray than tofu tan. but that's hard to be sure of in such a picture. 
 
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Joined Aug 21, 2004
 
I think it looks more beef like. It's too thick for tofu skin, the grain is too regular and the surface is more muscle fibrous than even like dried tofu.  At least the tofu skin I've encountered.
I agree with this. Looks like large intestine.
 
595
71
Joined Jun 28, 2010
 
I agree with this. Looks like large intestine.
It is definitely tofu skin. Tofu skin comes in sheet form and stick form. This is the stick form tofu skin. First it is soaked in water to make it soft, then deep fried for various recipes.

In the enlarged picture, you can actually very clearly see the circled inside thin tofu skin that was not fried thoroughly. The arrows point to the characteristic horizon lines of tofu skin in stick form. You can also see the typical bubbles of fried tofu skin.

dcarch


 
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