Do you blanch your bones prior to making stock?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by riffwraith, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. riffwraith

    riffwraith

    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    20
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Until yesterday, I have never heard of blanching the bones as the first step in making beef stock. Roasting, yes. Blanching, no.

    How many of you do this, and is it good practice to do prior to roasting? Or is it not necessary?
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,596
    Likes Received:
    538
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    It's a very Asian practice imho and appropriate to that cusisine.
     
  3. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

    Messages:
    584
    Likes Received:
    239
    Exp:
    Chef Emeritus
    Blanching is done to minimize the cloudiness.

    When you make a stock, you have to skim quite a bit of the scum off the top in the beginning.

    But with blanching, you just pour everything down the drain and start a new pot using the now scum-free bones.

    You don't really need to do this unless you want a crystal clear stock. The difference is minimal though, I find.

    I don't see the need for a super clear stock, but some fancy restaurants demand it as a way of showing high standards.

    It's a bad practice to do this prior to roasting.

    First, the bones will brown a lot slower from the added moisture. Also, the roasting process already coagulates and locks in the stuff that makes your stock cloudy.
     
  4. someday

    someday

    Messages:
    1,595
    Likes Received:
    375
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    ??? I don't know if it is Asian or not (but I believe you), but blanching bones for stock is very very French. I usually don't bother but if you have the staff/time it can lead to a cleaner stock.
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,596
    Likes Received:
    538
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    I see it a lot in Asian cusisine. I dont look much at french, a blind spot for me
     
  6. foodpump

    foodpump

    Messages:
    5,007
    Likes Received:
    561
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    Yeah, classic European veal stock— not a Demi, but a clear veal stock calls for this. Like Pat Pat says I think this is un necessary provided you skim off any scum during the initial boil.
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

    Messages:
    5,235
    Likes Received:
    339
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Blanching your bones helps remove impurities, coagulated protein, blood etc... from the bones so that your stock ends up clearer. If your bones are very clean you won't see much difference vs skimming, but if your bones produce a lot of scum then blanching first avoids hours of scumming your stock.
     
  8. foodpump

    foodpump

    Messages:
    5,007
    Likes Received:
    561
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    Well yeah, but what is scum? Dead protein. The fresher the bones, the less scum the stock will throw off. The older the bones are, the more scum they will throw off.
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

    Messages:
    5,235
    Likes Received:
    339
    Exp:
    At home cook
    aHA! I did not know that. Thanks for pointing that out.
     
  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,374
    Likes Received:
    927
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I only poach if I am not roasting the bones. If roasting, I find poaching a unnecessary step.
     
  11. abefroman

    abefroman

    Messages:
    1,413
    Likes Received:
    17
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Seems that would rob a lot of the flavor.
     
  12. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,374
    Likes Received:
    927
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    It really doesn't wash away that much flavor, considering that a good stock will often cook for hours to extract all the good stuff.
     
  13. someday

    someday

    Messages:
    1,595
    Likes Received:
    375
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Stock should be fairly neutral anyways since bones don't have that much flavor. I mean, on it's own, a straight veal stock doesn't really taste that good.

    I'm also not too big on roasted bones for stock. I like a nice clean white stock that I'll add roasted flavors too later if I want. Once in a blue moon I'll make a brown stock but it's rare.

    Blanching is nice to do, honestly, but I've really ever done it at one place I worked where we had a huge steam jacketed kettle that would tilt when we turned a wheel (also had a hose for water next to it) so it was really easy to just tilt, and drain the blanch water into the floor drain and refresh with ice and clean water.
     
  14. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

    Messages:
    584
    Likes Received:
    239
    Exp:
    Chef Emeritus
    How do you add roasted flavour to it afterward?

    I'm the opposite. I only make brown stock--for its intense flavour. I only make white stock when I'm too lazy too roast the bones.
     
  15. someday

    someday

    Messages:
    1,595
    Likes Received:
    375
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Take bones/meat scraps of whatever animals you are making the small sauce for and roast those. I.e. if I'm making a duck jus I can roast off the duck tenders and scraps and fortify my stock, same thing with beef scraps, etc.

    In my experience, roasted veal stocks and chicken stocks tend to get bitter 8/10 times once you reduce to consistency. Usually this is due to over roasting, the tomato pince burning, things like that.

    That's just my opinion though. Seems to work pretty well for me.
     
  16. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,374
    Likes Received:
    927
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    In many of the places I worked at, chicken stock was never made with roasted bones because we wanted a neutral flavor. If we wanted a stock with roasted flavor we'd use that neutral stock and then add roasted bones to it. On the other hand veal stock was always made with roasted bones.
     
  17. someday

    someday

    Messages:
    1,595
    Likes Received:
    375
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I mean, I just take that logic and extend it to veal stock as well. If I want a roasted flavor I'll add it later. I like a nice, clean, neutral stock that I can flavor how I want.