Do chefs use other people's Recipes

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Joined Feb 10, 2021
I believe nowdays, the source of information has become very large. It's always good to look around yourself for new recipes.
 
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Joined Jun 11, 2013
I may be reading too much into 'use' other people's recipes. I know many chefs that can be inspired by something another chef has made. For example, here in Seattle (about 25 years ago), the executive chef at Fuller's in the Sheraton Hotel was Monique Barbeau. She won the James Beard Award as Best Chef: Northwest, was a guest on Julia Child’s “In Julia’s Kitchen with Master Chefs”, and did a number of other noteworthy guest appearances and contributions.

Monique developed a salad from watermelon, feta cheese, and sage . . . these were three flavors I had never considered combining together, but it worked . . . really well. The flavor profile was remarkable for something with so few ingredients . . . watermelon delivered sweetness, feta cheese delivered a tangy and salty flavor, and the sage contributed an earthiness. I think this inspired other chefs to try their own variations on these ingredients. Did they 'use' her recipe? Depends on how you interpret the word 'use' . . . Did they copy it? Not really. But, it did inspire similar flavor profiles in other restaurants.
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
How about instead of the word "copy," we substitute "inspired by?"
If I see a recipe from someone else, and change one ingredient, then it becomes my recipe.
 
178
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Joined Jun 11, 2013
How about instead of the word "copy," we substitute "inspired by?"
If I see a recipe from someone else, and change one ingredient, then it becomes my recipe.
Absolutely! I think this happens all the time. Nearly every time I eat something I really like, I think of how I would make it and what I might do differently. Unfortunately, it's been nearly a year since I've been in a restaurant due to COVID-19 . . . but, I can come here and get inspired.
 
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