Different names for cuts of meat around the world

2,270
206
Joined Oct 2, 2010
 
Looks like the Sirloin End of a Pork Loin, filet would be round.
We seem to have different names for cuts of meat in Europe. In fact you're right, it's pork loin, but our (dutch) name for it is varkens filet, litteraly pork fillet.

This website shows a piece of it called varkensfilet but a bit lower they mention that the foreign name (Buitenlandse benaming) for it is "pork loin". So, in fact, we're both right.

http://www.spoelder.nl/varkensfilet
 
Last edited:
1,423
123
Joined Sep 26, 2012
 
We seem to have different names for cuts of meat in Europe. In fact you're right, it's pork loin, but our (dutch) name for it is varkens filet, litteraly pork fillet.

This website shows a piece of it called varkensfilet but a bit lower they mention that the foreign name (Buitenlandse benaming) for it is "pork loin". So, in fact, we're both right.

http://www.spoelder.nl/varkensfilet
The different cutting styles are going to drive me nuts one day. Here in southern Germany, "Schweinefilet" would be round, too like chefbuba said. "Schweinelende" would fit your cut better.

Nice dish, by the way
 
2,270
206
Joined Oct 2, 2010
@GeneMachine  I have no problem to use the name pork loin, so I edited my original post as I'm aware that it creates only confusion.

It's not a matter of who's right or wrong. It's simply a local difference. We in Belgium use the name "filet" for the cut that I used, since nearly all our culinary terminology comes from our neighbor France. Our cuisine is largely based on french cooking. I used a piece from the "côtes filet", exactly situated in the loin of the pig.

I found this drawing on a french website which shows the cuts of pork in France;


As you can see, the french call the loin meat also called "filet".

Coincidently, last Saturday, I was watching "Les Carnets de Julie", a French cooking program on the French channel TV3, in which the host Julie Andrieu visits small French regions to learn about regional cooking. Saterday she was in the Limoges region where she visited a lady who cooked with a "pointe de filet". I have to admit I never heard of that name, neither did Julie Andrieu. But, in the drawing you can see it's in the very lower back of the animal.

But, as said, for clarity, I'm going to use the name pork loin from now on.
 
Last edited:
1,423
123
Joined Sep 26, 2012

German cuts:

1) Kopf, 2) Backe, 3) Rückenspeck 4) Kamm/Nacken 5) Brust/Dicke Rippe 6) Stielkotelett 7) Lendenkotelett 8) Filet

9) Bauch 10) Lappen 11) Schulter/Schaufel 12) Hinterkeule 13) Eisbein 14) Spitzbein 15) Schwanz

The Hinterkeule is further broken down in Oberschale, Unterschale, Hüfte and Nuss.
 
2,462
252
Joined Mar 19, 2009
Oh... it's not from Europe. Wouldn't it be better a thread with cuts of differente meats all over the world?
 
1,423
123
Joined Sep 26, 2012
Since @Nicko  moved this out from the dinner thread, we should kindly ask him to adjust the title. A thread with a global overview would be a great resource. 

Master, please? ;)
 
4,690
1,260
Joined Nov 5, 2007
Interesting. @ordo's diagram shows lomo coming from near the back, I always thought it was a muscle from the shoulder.

mjb.
 
2,270
206
Joined Oct 2, 2010
@butzy  that pdf shows the different cuts over 10 pages, each time going a step further. The major parts are in dutch and French. Very interesting info, thanks for that.

And, also in dutch, here's a video of flemish culinary students visiting a modern artisan butchery. Here you can watch half a pork being cut into the major pieces. The whole purpose is to cut and prepare the "crown" from the carcass;

 
1,423
123
Joined Sep 26, 2012
 
ordo; I had no idea there were different names for the front and back feet of pork in Spanish; manitos and patitas. Litteraly "small hands and small feet".
Isn't the whole front leg called "hand" in english sometimes? That is, the part above the hock and below the blade?

EDIT: might be specifically British, not sure about that.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom