Different macaroni and cheese recipes

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by tony1126, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. tony1126

    tony1126

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    I'm wondering if anyone has some input about what different kinds of cheeses make for a new and tasty macaroni and cheese dish.??
     
  2. siduri

    siduri

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    Not having access to cheddar, i make my bechamel and add parmigiano and grated gruyere or emmenthal.  Parmigiano gives the sharpness, and the other gives the melting quality and some flavor.

    My italian-american friend makes a delicious macaroni and cheese with only ricotta, eggs, parmigiano, scamorza and provolone. 

    I'm sure you could do something with real fontina (aosta style) or gorgonzola, but i haven't ever done it. 
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Egg based mac and cheese is a good departure. Holds more cheese for stronger cheese impact, rich, decadent.

    I like to add parm and a little blue cheese to it as well to pump the strong cheese flavors.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/stove-top-mac-n-cheese-recipe/index.html is one version. Cook's Illustrated, Joy of Cooking have all published custard versions of Mac and Cheese.

    Many dishes are riffs on the concept of cheese and pasta, lasagne, pastitsio, manicotti, some ravioli/tortellini....
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2011
  4. siduri

    siduri

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    the problem with eggs in macaroni and cheese is that eggs harden as they cook, leaving the dish dry, not as many imagine, moist. 
     
  5. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    I make a bechamel then stir in sharp cheddar and some parmigiano. I'm not a big fan of blue cheeses, but I bet gorgonzola would be a nice choice for that. I've made mac and cheese, put it into individual Corelle dishes, topped with buttered crumbs, then put it in the freezer (tightly wrapped). I make this for my mother-in-law. She thaws the dishes in the fridge, then bakes until bubbly and brown. I've also made more sauce than I needed, so I've frozen it. It comes out thicker, so I thin it with milk and it's fine.
     
  6. durangojo

    durangojo

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    i've got one i call 'not your mama's mac and cheese'.. it's out of my 'seduction' meal repertoire( hey, every girl needs at least one)...briefly, appenzeller, gouda, and gruyere for the cheeses...sometimes smoked cheddar...artichoke hearts, shallots, amontillado sherry and some other good stuff as well.....parmigiano on top... cheesegasm for sure!

    joey

    it goes without saying, cream and pasta, right? i use fusilli....once i added crabmeat as well...might have been a bit over the top though.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2011
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    durangojo, consider me seduced.

    Mine: Cook ziti in salted water to al dente. Heat milk with a couple of whole cloves, until scented. To the milk add fresh oregano, fresh thyme, and a bit of crumbled sage. Meanwhile, soften some minced onions in butter, add flour to make a roux, cook the raw off the flour. Stir just enough dry vermouth into the roux to make it smooth. Add the hot milk to the roux, cook until it thickens. Add grated sharp white cheddar, cotija, gouda or asiago, and aged jack or oaxaca; then temp a couple of beaten eggs, and incorporate. Add finely chopped scallion tops, and you may also add a bit of minced ham, crisp smoked bacon, or some huitlacoche. Top with more cotija, mixed with well buttered bread crumbs. Bake in a medium oven until the custard sets and the top browns.

    Kids like it. Goes well with salad and white wine for adults. Good side for 'cue and other American soul food.

    BDL
     
  8. leeniek

    leeniek

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    I have one recipe that calls for chipotle in adobo to be added to the cheese sauce.  I have made it twice and both times everyone (including my son who has some issues when it comes to textures of food) liked it alot.  I will have to dig it  up though as off the top of my head I don't remember the ingredients exactly.  I served it with a mixed green salad with ranch dressing and for dessert mixed melons and pineapple. 
     
  9. chefhow

    chefhow

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    I like to make an over the top HEAVY bechamel with smoked gouda, Gruyere, and Parmesan.  Let it cool completely and add your pasta.  Refrigerate and scoop into balls, freeze the balls, roll in seasoned flour, egg wash and panko, deep fry and enjoy.
     
  10. chefross

    chefross

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    I just opened this thread. I don't make a Bechamel at all. I cook the pasta al Denta, then drain....then pour into a greased casserole dish. I  1/2" dice whatever cheese I am using, American, Provolone, Gruyere, Gouda, Edam. (Any, or a mixture or whatever I have around) I then push these pieces down under the surface of the pasta. Sometimes I'll add sauteed onions and herbs. After this I place pats of butter on the surface of the pasta all around, spoon a couple tablespoons of all purpose flour on that, then pour enough whole milk in the casserole dish to completely cover the pasta. I use my hand to push everything under the surface. More shredded cheese goes on top. This goes into a 350 degree oven, covered, for 45 minutes, then uncovered for the last 15 ore until golden brown and bubbly
     
  11. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Wow, I'm boring compared to yall. I just do bechamel, cheese, sometime beer, dry mustard, worcester, paprika. Sometime laison with egg. Toss with parcooked mac. Dish, top with buttered and cheesed crumbs. Bake, serve with Crystal's type hotsauce.

    I really want to try the sauce from Modernist Cuisine. It's been getting good reviews. Uses emulsifiying salts (IIRC sodium citrate).
     
  12. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Tincook`

    Your formula is almost the same as a dish called Welsh Rarebit  only in some cases Ale was used and aged cheddar.
     
  13. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Ayup, that's why I do it that way.

    Used to have welsh rarebit dinners alot when I was a kid.
     
  14. bscepter

    bscepter

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    ok, i know it comes from martha stewart, but this  recipe has done very well for me in the past. nothing strange - it's your usual béchamel sauce based recipe - but it seems to work out pretty great. i like it with either gruyere or pecorino.
     
  15. yummyspice

    yummyspice

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    Or if you want something simple...

    I use a white sauce with a cheese sauce and cream of chicken soup.  I also like to put some chopped onion sauted in butter, parsley, salt and pepper in it.
     
  16. bodhran1965

    bodhran1965

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    I do a kids mac and cheese for weddings that works well. I use several robust cheeses for the mornay then add steamed cauliflower and cooked white beans to the sauce. I let it cook for about 30 minutes then puree well. Kids and parents love it and it increases veg content.

    Ken Harper
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 28, 2015
  17. beachchef22

    beachchef22

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    Some interesting variances from the standard "mac & cheese" recipes......................I say you can't go wrong with a good array of cheeses......I think most diners would agree that a strong abundance of sharp cheddar, along with a smattering of "other" cheeses, would produce a great mac & cheese...Also, I've found through experience that, if pre-cooking large quantities of mac & cheese when using a cream & butter-based recipe....when re-heating, tends to "break" the sauce you intend to finish with....I like to cook the pasta...and then make a cheese sauce using cornstarch that avoids the possibility of breaking........I like to incorporate butter and milk  (like my mom used to use).   Also, if you can add the sauce later, I find it produces the best results...don't make it 6 hours early and expect it to look creamy and moist..............and don't forget the garnish...add some color at the end...all that hard work for an ordinary-looking dish?  Comon...