difference between cuts

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i can not figure out what the difference between cutting a sandwich with knife parallel to sandwich (back and forth sawing) vs angling the knife and going up and down in short strokes with tip does as far as the result goes or why one may choose one over the other. Can anyone here give me some advice or thoughts on this.
 

phatch

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The regular chefs knife motion is kind of egg shaped. The downward combined with the forward push gives an efficient cut. The return motion completes the egg shape and prepares for the next cut.

The regular cut motion tends to compress bread, where a sawing motion, particular with a serrated blade preserves the quality of the bread. Once you reach the filling, a regular cutting motion is more efficient. Sawing there tends to push the filling out of place.

Cutting a sandwich is a bunch of compromises that will depend on your experience and equipment and ingredients more than a set of hard rules. For me, I tend to saw at the start then finish with a forward gliding chop through the rest of the sandwich. But each sandwich poses it's own challenge.
 
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I got this bread knife a few days ago and I have to say I make no compromises on sandwich slicing. Cuts bread, cuts cake, slices roasts, easily cuts sandwich fillings. Nothing is pushed anywhere, just cut in place. The best part is that you can sharpen this serrated knife on stones


It's about $10 cheaper than normal right now
 
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phatch.... i am talking about using the tip on the sandwich only doing quick up and down strokes to cut sandwich and why might the saw back and forth on the sandwich  be different from the first i describe (tip up and down short strokes). Are you saying with the tip cutting more efficient cut ? just want to be on the same page here with what you said.
 
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This is exactly why I don't like sandwiches.  I don't like cutting in to them and I don't like biting into them for this very same reason.  The different pressure that has to be given at different points of the sandwich by way of knife or tooth.  I do like a good grilled cheese or a soft tuna sandwich.  
 
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Okay, I'm mystified. This is a difficulty I've never experienced.

Here is my sandwich, sitting on the board in front of me. I would like to cut it in half. I have a very sharp chef's knife in my right hand.

I place the tip (not the point, the tip) of the knife at the far edge of the sandwich, just barely resting on the crust. The blade is angled down, perhaps 20-25 degrees. My left hand arcs up over the sandwich, fingertips curled under, the knuckles serving as a guide for the flat of the knife.

I push sharply forward and a little bit down. My aim is to complete the cut by having the heel of the knife touch down on the board just on the near side of of the near edge of the sandwich.

The total stroke takes a fraction of a second, gliding rapidly forward. Most of the downward motion comes from the fact that the blade is angled. The sliding of the razor-sharp edge shears through whatever is in its way without fuss or trouble. The heel touches down even by the near edge, cutting the sandwich into two pieces cleanly.

What's difficult about this?
 
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Most of those 'sandwich knives' are really made for spreading.  If you're talking about cutting, the serrated slicer i posted is ideal
 
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What's difficult about this?

Nothing really ....... unless the sandwich has a soft or loose filling and a bunch stacked addons (like tomato, avocado) and a lot of designer greens. It takes a bit of 'containment' action to keep the innards from squeezing out or simply falling off under even gentle top down pressure. Eating it ain't always a picnic either. :eek:
 
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Well, you can't go by that. There are silly kitchen gadget for all kinds of things.
They're not silly kitchen gadgets, go into any deli and sandwich place in NYC and you'll see these gadgets put to good and appropriate use.  I see these all the time, especially at bagel shops.   Urghh just thinking about cutting through a bagel loaded with soft cream cheese makes me squirm.
 
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Trying to imagine how that offset knife makes it easier to cut sandwiches. [emoji]129300[/emoji]
 

phatch

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Keeps your fingers clear of the board same as the clearance on a chefs knife.
 
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Hmmmmm. My cutting board is 2" thick so I just cut close to the lead edge if I'm using a straight knife.
 

phatch

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phatch.... i am talking about using the tip on the sandwich only doing quick up and down strokes to cut sandwich and why might the saw back and forth on the sandwich  be different from the first i describe (tip up and down short strokes). Are you saying with the tip cutting more efficient cut ? just want to be on the same page here with what you said.
I suspect this is about a dull knife grabbing more than cutting and sliding the sandwich around. This technique avoids that. If it's for another reason, its not clear to me what that might be. 
 
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