Demi glace Base??

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Joined Jun 26, 2006
Both frozen wisconsin based provini and culinarte were mentioned in the posts. I used culinarte, because it's like day and night compared to provimi. They both come in 1lb frozen packs, but they also come in 16 lb frozen tubs. The difference is, the 1lb packs are a 90% reduction, the 16lb tubs are 50% reduction.The 16lb culinarte tub is only 1000 times better then the 90% 1lb provimi. Just a side note culinarte was started by forner provimi managers. If you want gravy buy provimi, if you what smooth creamy demi, buy culinarte. Price wise, 16lb culinarte approx. $70.00, 16lb provimi, 110.00, don't be fooled by price.And yes the 90% reduction is $12-13 a lb. Also, culinarte makes a spot-on roasted chicken demi. It is unbelievable. For the guys with a big kitchen, your right on about making your, but line isn't much bigger than a master bathroom. Got to go with what works, Hope this helps.
 
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Joined Jun 26, 2006
Both wiscomsin frozen demi's were mention in the posts, I have used culinarte for about 4 years. About 6 months ago my order arrived and it was provimi. I called my supplier, and they said it was the same as culinarte. Wrong! it was bad gravy, period. I found a new supplier and dumped the provimi. First, both sell 1lb frozen packs, but both sell 16lb tubs.The difference is as follows, The 1lb slabs are supposed to be 90% reduction,culinarte is, the 16lb tubs are a 50% reduction,culinarte is.I don't know what provimi is thinking about thier product, but the owners of culinarte are former GM's of provimi. Price wise, 1lb frozen slabs $12-13 a pound, 16lb tubs about $70.00 each.Also, culinarte has 12lb tubs of roasted chicken demi, yes demi.It is spot-on in taste,unbelievable. Also mentioned in the posts, if you have the room and equipment,yes, make it,but my kitchen isn't much bigger than a large master bath. Hope this helps.
 
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Joined Jun 27, 2006
I have been making the real thing for years now to the point that i had a huge stock pot overnight on every night. Bones would come in right from the truck to the oven. There really is no comparable substitute that i know of, but look into a specialty food purveyor. They usually carry several kinds (veal,duck,lamb). I know Sysco even carries a decent one although it is special order. I would then use the base to strech out my stocks and you dont have to reduce them as far. Try adding wine reductions to intensify your sauces and cut down the amounts per plate. Contemporary plating uses less sauce than old school dishes anyway. I worked with one chef who actually thought he was making demi by replacing browned PSMO chains for bones, what and idiot! But you could add them to your stock to provide some flavor, just no viscosity.:chef:
 
1,593
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Joined Jun 27, 2006
I'm a firm believer that "necessity is the mother of invention and It takes an owner to really screw up a kitchen"! Personally I have replaced so many pairs of the shoes that ChefBK talks about well... cut the guy some slack. He's obviously not happy about what he has to serve, and is tyring to find a better alternative but needs to do what he has to. There is no real replacement for scratch. I'm a believer of this to a fault. But eventually you have to make do with what scenario you are given. I don't consider this resting on your laurels but good jobs or atleast good paying jobs are getting harder to find. He's got a family to consider.
Frankly the labor constraints he's been given are rediculious but like I said it takes an owner to really screw up a kitchen.

The Provimi and Culinarte products are above average by most standards so unless your Sauce instructor was Jean Bonchet or Paul J Gode, no one is going to know the difference. It's like using 40% fresh vs 40% ultra-pasturized heavy cream. Yea you'll know it's not the same and a trained pallete can tell the difference but the average guest can't. Especially if you doctor the glace up.

On the other hand if it's a restaurant where the PPA cracks the 75.00 + mark then only the scratch version should be used but for his operations price point it's really not necessary. If I remember there were a couple steak houses in Atlanta that did or do the covers ChefBK is describing but they also have or had an army of kitchen employees on hand to do this. In fact one of them would run a stock kettle and reduction pot almost 24/7.

Keep up the effort ChefBK. :D
 
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Joined May 30, 2006
okay the way to make demi glace the right way is to take brown stock and brown sauce and then reduced them by 1/2 and it should keep for about a mouth or you can even freezer it.
 
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Joined Jun 27, 2006
Okay Chefhope, in case you didn't know or maybe they didn't teach you in school, the demi-glace of today is a more refined version of that Escoffier B.S. REAL chefs today use strictly reductions, NO ROUX, NO ESPAGNOLE!
This is something you will learn if you go on to work in contemporary kitchens. So next time you jump in on a thread and try to correct seasoned veterans, remember you are still IN culinary school.

Peace,

Chef Mike
 
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Joined Jun 18, 2006
Man this place is frickin vicious I mean **** I am glad I am usually just a lurker cuz god for bid if you respond and someone has a different opinion the person gets flamed! I would just like to thank the members here who arent full of themselves and have a little respect for other people!
 
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Joined Jun 27, 2006
Sorry Johnarmr, I'm usually not like that, however I didn't care for his tone when he says "okay the way to make demi glace the right way is". I guess it's also part the fact that I learned and am still learning from 18 years of Hard Knocks, not a culinary school. And i don't mean to take anything away from school because i probably would have went if i had the chance years ago.

Peace,

Chef Mike
 
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Joined Jun 18, 2006
I am not classically trained from a school either but your right if I had the money I would have or still would if I had the chance but I dont I am a lifer in this buisness and yes a graduate of hard knocks myself. It is not just your post, I just noticed a lot of ill feelings on these boards which kinda caught me off gaurd and kinda bummed me out cuz I love to hang in places like this in my little free time that I have!
 
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Joined Jun 27, 2006
I certainly don't have it out for culinary students or grads, but in my experience i've worked with very few who had a good attitude or overall knowledge. Most of which couldn't cook themselves out of a paper bag. I wish schools would teach more about the production end of the business, not just how things were done a hundred years ago. Anyway, I think some of them think when they're done they're like "wow, I'm a chef now" and are abruptly put in their place. It is not some fantasyTVfoodnetworkland, which is why many never make it and opt for another career in the long run. My advice would be to get a business degree first, so they have something to fall back on.

Peace,

Chef Mike
 
1,593
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Joined Jun 27, 2006
Hey chefbk! If yer out there today I sent ya a recipe that worked for me once. I came up with it when the Owners of the place I was the Exec at said to drop labor or find a new job. I have no problem with following tradition but bills do have to be paid. Since my name wasn't anywhere on the ownership of the operation well... Some Execs are still just employees. "Suck is life" I guess. Tweek it as necessary. :D

Later and good luck.
 

jolly roger

Banned
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Joined Jan 27, 2006
Iron cheffin'06...YOU ROCK!!! This buisness is not for the weak or lazy...PERIOD!!! You want a real veal STOCK YOU WILL ENVENTIALLY TURN INTO A TRUE DEMI??? BUY THE BONES!!!

Mod's note: Edited for relevance and brevity
 
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Joined Jun 18, 2006
no reeally tell us how you really feel jollyroger! So all this fus on doing it the right way yet none of the sesoned experts has shared their secret recipe for demi ?????
 
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Joined Oct 23, 2003
dude, i thought you got the boot once already....

Mod's note: irrelevant section of quote removed
 
1,593
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Joined Jun 27, 2006
Hey Jolly,

A civil keyboard would be appreciated I'm sure by all. If you're "all that" what exactly is you position at the moment and how long have you been at this profession? Have you ever been in the situation that chefbk is currently in? I have to say there are a good many jobs out there that ARE NOT worth loosing over a principle especially one that isn't illegal and won't cause harm to the general public or self. I have lost jobs on principle in the past unfortunately now with a family I would never want to put them in that position.

Not starting a war with you but man take a step back from the ledge and pull your finger off the trigger.:D
 
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Joined Sep 22, 2009
Thought I'd resurect this thread to ask a question. I'm a private chef who cooks for a family and I've been using Bonewerks Demi Glace Classic. Now I see they offer a more expensive, by $35, Premium Glace/Demi Elite. Does anyone use the Elite? If so, is the extra cost worth it? Thanks.
 
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Joined Sep 22, 2009
I thought I'd revive this thread to ask a current question. I'm a private chef and I've been using Bonewerks Demi Glace Classic. I recently noticed a new Bonewerks product - Premium Glace/Demi Elite. Is anyone using this and if so, is it worth the extra green, $35? Thanks.
 

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