Demi glace Base??

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chefbk, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. chefbk

    chefbk

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    Hi-
    I know that its cheating, but we get so intensely busy that we need to be
    very quick at times. I currently use Minor's demi glace base and zip it up with shallots, wine, and fresh herbs.
    Can anyone reccomend a good demi glace base? Or is the one that I'm using
    about the best I'll find? I know...it's cheating! But if you could be a fly on the wall when we do ala carte $175k a week in food sales, all made to order!
    Thanks,
    Brian
     
  2. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Provimi makes a frozen demi glace. Packaged in 1 pound packets, 20 to a case. It is not cheap, but better than base. What kind of place do you work at? Fine dining or casual? What is your price point?
     
  3. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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    How long does real Demi-Glacé keep in the freezer?

    thanks,
    dan
     
  4. even stephen

    even stephen

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    Thats right, Provimi or Art Culinaire. They do however
    cost about $10 to $12 per 1# envelope. They are pure
    veal demi with no gelatin or chems added. It is a pretty
    good product, off hand, probably as good as 90% of
    kitchens can produce. I like it. Food has become pretty
    progressive and veal demi and butter sauces are not
    used as much. When storage, i.e. freezer space, is an
    issue, or if you don't have a steam kettle, it is the way
    to go.
     
  5. chefbk

    chefbk

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    It's an upscale casual. The price point is $12-$22. With filets at $26.
    Thanks,
    Brian
     
  6. chef kaiser

    chef kaiser

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    Brian,

    Well as the saying goes, fresh is always the best. However considering certain operations, volume and at the end to stay competitive with the price, at times in todays world, one has no other chance than reaching to such products.

    We also run an operation producing 3000 meals a day, therefore we also use bases. What we do with demi glace - we simply cut vegetables into matignon than roast it untill brownish - add little tomato paste, roast it -than deglaze with red wine and reduce it - add some water and simmer it for 30 minutes. Thereafter we add the base and you will see the result.

    Inorder to reduce the powder quantity you also can dust the vegetables with flour and instead of water you add a strong fresh beef stock (bouillon) if you have. well there are may ways to do it.

    good luck
     
  7. jeebus

    jeebus

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    I am sorry but the above is just plain lazyness. If we managed to do fresh stock (4-5 at a time beef, chicken dark and light, lamb and game) for the Air Canada Centre there is no reason any other kitchen can not do it. we ran 3 restaurants, catering, outside catering, suites and bassically had 21000 new guests every game. Powders are for hacks.....period.
     
  8. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Jeebus, more power to you. Please understand that some people may not have the facilities or the staff that you have. I've been on both sides and I can totally see the point of using a base. I know some people are willing to go to greater lengths to not compromise their ideals, but any chef in charge of 3,000 meals a day is hardly lazy.
     
  9. jeebus

    jeebus

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    To me if you are seving $22 mains there is no excuse to use a powdered base.Assuming each guest at that price spends $35 per person thats 100K a day in sales. If you can't pay a body to make stocks everyday doing those kind of sales how on earth can an average joint do it? Perhaps i was trained differently but i would throw myself into a buffalo chopper before I would use a base. For that matter at least one of my chefs would make stock from my corpse .
     
  10. chef kaiser

    chef kaiser

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    Hi,
    Well it should not be a point of argument. But maybe one should also understand location, were do you cook and for how many people. It is different, when I can spend 7 $ in the West at cost or 1 $ in South East Asia for the daily employees meal in a Bank with international affiliation. Well that is the budget. The kilogram of carrots is US cents 78, and other vegetables pritty much in the same level. Beef shoulder cost is US 4.31 the kilo and chicken is also not that cheap at US 1.96 / kilo. I believe with these information now, any chef should understand, why sometimes powder simply are the only solution, especially when cooking for 50 plus nations. However how to use them right, is still the secrtet of the chef, as we all hopfully know how to cook the basic stocks right

    regards
     
  11. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Hmm, are you big boned or well marbled? :D
     
  12. andrew563

    andrew563

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    I would love to be making my own demi, and stocks. But, my walk in is crammed full, I have boxes sitting on milk crates. I have four burners to work with and a reach in that has been converted into a freezer. I have no room for storing or cooking of stocks or demi.
     
  13. iplaywithfood

    iplaywithfood

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    try this product:
    glace de veau by culinarte.. its real easy. its a demi ready to go.
    comes in one pound paks, and all you have to do is heat and eat.

    hope that helps
     
  14. cjdacook

    cjdacook

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    In a pinch (and we've all been in a pinch now and then!!), I've used More Than Gourmet's Glace de Viande Gold. They have a varied selection of stocks that are darn good.
     
  15. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Wait BK so you telling us you do maybe 800+ covers a night?
     
  16. seansps

    seansps

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    I say homemade is better period if at the least you could make large amounts of stock and freeze it, ice cube trays work well for this. I feel that a lot of chefs in america have tried so hard to lower food and labor cost, and short cut their way that most restaurants are not worth eating at! And this is a prime example of why European chefs laugh at American chefs so heres my advice if you dont want to put out the best food you can make find a new line of work becausl I for one am sick of working with hacks!
     
  17. jeebus

    jeebus

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    Absolutely, but the longer I spend on this forum the more I figure out it is mostly full of hacks. "Kitchenmanagertalk" would be a better name for this forum cause there a very few chefs here and even fewer that run at a high level. It is quite disgraceful. There is absolutely no excuse for using second rate powdered garbage. If you can justify it in your own head you too are a hack.
     
  18. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    This thread is being reopened. There's plenty of good information here. Please try and keep it civil.
     
  19. chefbk

    chefbk

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    During the warmer months we do about 1200 covers a day! I don't use powdered demi crap either! The owner has tied my hands with staffing! 1200 covers with 3 cooks, a dish and one prep and myself or sous during the day...4 cooks, one dish and one prep, sous and myself at night! And we usually do about 25k in food on a sat! It is intense! If I get 10 min to jam some food down my gullet..I'm lucky.
    Very small storage, cases also on milk crates in the cooler & freezer.
    I would definitely PREFER SCRATCH!! But when you have no staff and intense
    business, I try to do my best. Minors demi, and provimi with red wine, fresh
    veg and simmer a few hours and strain. Before criticizing..first walk in my shoes!
    No hack here!!
    BK
     
  20. suzanne

    suzanne

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    All the restaurants I worked in (including a NY Times 4-star) made just about everything from scratch -- stocks, sauces, even chili powders and curry pastes. Of course I believe that scratch is, within reason, the best way to go. (I'm still on the fence about commercial mayonnaise, though. :look: )

    But would I be so rude as to accuse an entire group of colleagues of being hacks just because some of them are forced by circumstances to use convenience products? Not on your life. Sure, there are hacks in this business, as there are in every business, but it's just plain rude to make a blanket statement like that, and in that tone of voice.

    Real genius is not to start with the best of everything and make it into something good, but to start with whatever you can get and turn it into something wonderful.