Delmonico Steak

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Joined Dec 28, 2010
I am tired of listening people feeding misinformation. Whether it be other stores/restaurants or my coworkers.

I had always used the eye of the ribeye.

What have you used, or seen advertised as a Delmonico Steak?
 
3,401
162
Joined Sep 18, 2008
Take a look at What is a Delmonico Steak and you will see:
[h1]What is a Delmonico Steak?[/h1]There are more than sixty different beef cuts in the meat case today. Add in the fact that many cuts have several different names and the meat case can be very confusing.
And a steak may be labeled a certain name in one area of the U.S., and the same labeled name in another area might be a completely different cut of steak.
In my area, Southeast Missouri, a Delmonico steak is a Boneless Top Sirloin beef steak.

In other parts of the country, a Delmonico is a Bone-In Top Loin Steak (cut from the short loin), or a Rib-Eye Steak (cut from the rib).

So, unless you know if the Delmonico steak you have had before was cut from: the Short Loin, Sirloin, or Rib, it's hard to tell exactly what you have eaten before as a Delmonico steak.
You could possible look at the above three choices labeled as such in the grocery's meat case, and see if one of those "looked" like what you had before. If so, then go with that one.
I know this wasn't a quick easy answer, but there really isn't one. But I hope this sets you out on the right path.
 
40
10
Joined Dec 28, 2010
Take a look at What is a Delmonico Steak and you will see:
[h1]What is a Delmonico Steak?[/h1]There are more than sixty different beef cuts in the meat case today. Add in the fact that many cuts have several different names and the meat case can be very confusing.
And a steak may be labeled a certain name in one area of the U.S., and the same labeled name in another area might be a completely different cut of steak.
In my area, Southeast Missouri, a Delmonico steak is a Boneless Top Sirloin beef steak.

In other parts of the country, a Delmonico is a Bone-In Top Loin Steak (cut from the short loin), or a Rib-Eye Steak (cut from the rib).

So, unless you know if the Delmonico steak you have had before was cut from: the Short Loin, Sirloin, or Rib, it's hard to tell exactly what you have eaten before as a Delmonico steak.
You could possible look at the above three choices labeled as such in the grocery's meat case, and see if one of those "looked" like what you had before. If so, then go with that one.
I know this wasn't a quick easy answer, but there really isn't one. But I hope this sets you out on the right path.
which one have you used?
 
3,401
162
Joined Sep 18, 2008
I've never served "Delmonico Steak" (maybe because I think that it is only served at Delmonico's?? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif) . I have served Ribeye, New York Strip, Kansas City Strip, and I've eaten Spencer steak.
 
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
3,987
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Joined Dec 18, 2010
The regional differences in marketing terms for both meats and vegetables make life really tough for many people.  I goe through this frequently with my wife and we often end up arguing when she comes back from a market telling me that the "meat man" or the "vegetable man" says there is nothing called (insert whatever I wrote on the grocery list).  Now I point to the body part I want and tell my wife to go to the butcher and slap her shoulder while saying "Puerco" when I want a pork picnic.  Believe it or not, it really works!  If I want a ham...
 
3,599
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Joined Aug 13, 2006
I have a big problem because all the meat cuts here are different - not only different names but different cuts. 

Sora, fiorentina, spalla, filetto, controfiletto, pancetta, etc etc etc.  I have no idea what they correspond to in the states.  Ribeye? No idea what it is.  It's very annoying when i want to translate recipes (though, admittedly, for me the meat i really like is just grilled or roasted, and as for the rest i'd just as soon eat lentils and chickpeas - it's certainly cheaper.)

Anyone know of some good comparison charts of italian cuts and american ones? 

I find that most of the sites that try to compare anything european and american (starting from shoe sizes, that are never correct) are always somewhat limited by the author's inferior knowledge of the culture that is not their own. 

Like chuck steak, what is that anyway, what would i have to ask for?  or london broil? 
 
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Joined Jan 8, 2010
Yeah, I feel the same way:

For me it's been a transition from the Dutch cuts that I'm used to, to the English ones.

Even checking the charts doesn't really work as the whole thing is cut up differently!

I think the Dutch way of cutting is based on the French way and I'm assuming (always a dangerous thing to do) that the Italian cut is quite similar.

Chuck, I've learned, is good for stewing and I use it to make mince as well. But here it is sold quite often as chuck and shoulder together.......

I think we know it under a lot of different names but right now I can't even tell them to you in Dutch, let alone Italian!

But I did find a site that gives names in french as well. Might be interesting to see for the anglo saxon world as well... (http://passie.horeca.nl/fav/De soorten vlees Rund.pdf)

Siduri, can you let me know if this is similar to how beef is cut up in Italy?
 
7,675
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
The regional differences in marketing terms for both meats and vegetables make life really tough for many people.  I goe through this frequently with my wife and we often end up arguing when she comes back from a market telling me that the "meat man" or the "vegetable man" says there is nothing called (insert whatever I wrote on the grocery list).  Now I point to the body part I want and tell my wife to go to the butcher and slap her shoulder while saying "Puerco" when I want a pork picnic.  Believe it or not, it really works!  If I want a ham...


 Haha brilliant!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
 
3,401
162
Joined Sep 18, 2008
Now I point to the body part I want and tell my wife to go to the butcher and slap her shoulder while saying "Puerco" when I want a pork picnic.  Believe it or not, it really works!  If I want a ham...
This could get interesting, a video of the butcher's face when she asked for a breast of lamb ??? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
 
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Joined Aug 13, 2006
If you go to Ask The Meatman , you can find the American names for most cuts of meat as well as charts


Thanks pete, but i do have charts in books, i just wanted to know if anyone has made a reliable comparison chart.  I can ask for a cut that doesn;t exist here, but probably they would have had to begin by butchering a cow in a whole different way.

Also i can't find any chart on the site except a tiny one which you have to order, but it doesn't seem to open up to view it online.  Or am i looking in the wrong place?
 
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