Degustation meneu

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1
Joined May 8, 2021
Hello Chefs,

Have a 12 course degustation function coming up, we have a team of 5 chefs ranging in experience.
Never had to run one of these before.
We also live in the NT in Australia, so might be hard to source certain ingredients.
We have 80 covers at $130 a head.
Must have a wine paring with each main choice.

Does anyone have any tips for running a degustation?
How large are the portions?
Should the overall menu be easy and functional?
We are thinking about a around the world theme with food from a range of cuisines, would this add to much complexity as a whole?

Any help would be appreciated.
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
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546
Joined Jun 11, 2001
12 courses plus wine flight? That is a lot of wine even at a 3oz pour. I'm going to put down what I can come up with in no particular order.

Rule #1 for wines is pour from lighter to heavier. Sauvignon Blanc -> Chardonnay -> Shiraz -> Cab -> dessert wine. And your courses follow along the same line.

Your total protein portion for all twelve courses should be around 8-10oz.

Are you including amuse bouche at the start, intermezzo in the middle, and migniardise at the end? If so are you counting those as courses?

Don't serve salad. (my bias) ;)

You may serve two intermezzo courses

Try to use each ingredient only once.

And you know of course that organization, lists, all very important.

For 12 courses you will need to go by time. Unless you are hosting Chaine de Rotisseurs dinner where some of the dinners can be legendary people are going to have their limits. 3.5 hours is probably the maximum people can sit through.

Reset the table by the grouping of your course. eg., three forks, two wine glasses (or one, or three), two knives, for the first three courses. Then refresh the table.

As far as your chefs go you should put the most experienced chef at the head of the plating line. You can rotate by having the chef who designed the plate fire the proteins or have one person doing it.
 
3,291
726
Joined May 5, 2010
I'll chime in here.
I've done countless wine dinners.
My experience tells me that after the 3rd or 4th course, "the dining room will be up for grabs."
There are people that come to wine dinnesr but don't drink the wine. They may go with beer or the hard stuff.
I think you can get away with using a wine with 2 courses. It's all in menu design.
Soup doesn't get a wine.
I agree with Kuan on the salad, but if you must, move it to the course right before dessert. In European cuisine, the salad is the last course.
You can have 2 Intermezzo.
I also know that the plates must be small enough, like only 1-2 bites worth of food.
Don't keep the people waiting in between courses. The kitchen MUST be an organized food factory.
Oh, I almost forgot the most important thing.
You'll need to choose the wines, then re-create the menu and taste those wine choices to see if the meld. Don't listen to your wine guy and allow him to choose wines without food knowledge.
I wish you luck....
 
27
1
Joined May 8, 2021
12 courses plus wine flight? That is a lot of wine even at a 3oz pour. I'm going to put down what I can come up with in no particular order.

Rule #1 for wines is pour from lighter to heavier. Sauvignon Blanc -> Chardonnay -> Shiraz -> Cab -> dessert wine. And your courses follow along the same line.

Your total protein portion for all twelve courses should be around 8-10oz.

Are you including amuse bouche at the start, intermezzo in the middle, and migniardise at the end? If so are you counting those as courses?

Don't serve salad. (my bias) ;)

You may serve two intermezzo courses

Try to use each ingredient only once.

And you know of course that organization, lists, all very important.

For 12 courses you will need to go by time. Unless you are hosting Chaine de Rotisseurs dinner where some of the dinners can be legendary people are going to have their limits. 3.5 hours is probably the maximum people can sit through.

Reset the table by the grouping of your course. eg., three forks, two wine glasses (or one, or three), two knives, for the first three courses. Then refresh the table.

As far as your chefs go you should put the most experienced chef at the head of the plating line. You can rotate by having the chef who designed the plate fire the proteins or have one person doing it.
Yes those courses are going to be included and count towards the 12 course total, so is 2 palate cleansers. Hors D'oeuvre's as well at the start. So this brings the total main courses down by 5.

Yes indeed, started getting all the lists together and looking at the team dynamics and who is strong where.

I didn't know about the table resets, didn't even cross my mind. Thanks for all the tips.

Was thinking about a warm duck breast salad with watercress, walnut, and mandarin.

I really appreciate your time and help in this.

 

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