Damaged stainless steel pan?

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by nyc_dave, Jan 12, 2006.

  1. nyc_dave

    nyc_dave

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    Hello all..

    New here to forums... got a "newbie" question...

    How can you tell if a stainless steel frying pan has been damaged due to med to med-high heat/ and burnt food/oil?

    Are there any key signs to look for? Warping? Extreme discoloration... etc..

    Any help would be appreciated, as it's a beautiful pan, and I would hate to have ruined it due to a few minutes of unfortuante, but unavoidbale neglect.

    Thanks,
    -Dave
     
  2. sushigaijin

    sushigaijin

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    hi.

    stainless pans will stain (yellowish, in my experience) when exposed to very high heat.

    However, you cannot damage those pans under normal cooking temperatures, only stain them. I would even go so far as to recommend saving a few dollars by buying stained steel pans instead of NIB.

    E
     
  3. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Bartender's Friend, available at grocery stores by other powders such as Bon Ami, Comet, etc. works good for removing temperature stains.
     
  4. nyc_dave

    nyc_dave

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    Thanks for the replys... much appreciated.

    -Dave
     
  5. panini

    panini

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    Hold on guys. Stainless steel pans are notorious for hot spots when overheated. Once you get a hot spot, you never get rid of it, It will always burn in the same spot.
    On better stainless, the manufacturer will laminate or clad the pan with aluminum or copper for a more even heat distribution. Some will even take the clad up the sides. Theremay also be other alloids used, but Ireally don't know that. maybenickel?
    NYC_Dave.
    Do you know if your pan is clad.? The bottom will usually be thicker looking.
    You will know if you have damaged it, if it keeps burning in the same place.
    I don't know how to test otherwise. Maybe boil water in it. Maybe the hot spot if you even have one will bubble first. That is just a guess though.
    I hope this has not happen. If this is an expensive pan then it is probably clad.
    HTH
    no intention of offending anyone. I have first hand knowlege of this.
    pan
     
  6. nyc_dave

    nyc_dave

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    Thanks, Panini.

    Hot spots were what I was worried about... but it is a "good" pan; an All Clad Copper Core.

    I didn't think it'd be damaged from the abusive usage I exposed it to, but wanted to be sure...

    I was thinking instead of water, perhaps something like a crepe at low temp would work to see if it was still cooking evenly...

    will give it a shot...

    Thanks again.
     
  7. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Oh, man, I have abused my All-Clads to the point where if they were my children, they'd be in foster homes. :eek:

    But in spite the warnings AC gives on their flyers, those pans are built to last forever in spite of terrible treatment. I've burnt stuff onto them, left them too long over too high heat -- but as long as the bonding holds, the pans keep working just fine. And given the conditions under which they are manufactured, I don't worry that the bonding will give way.
     
  8. nyc_dave

    nyc_dave

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    Great to know.. thx!
     
  9. panini

    panini

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    Like Suzanne, I can't even remember how old my all clad are. They still look new.
    You don't have to worry or test. Although I think the crepe idea is far better than water.
    Sorry for any confussion. I was given a set of cheaper stainless by a vendor for xmas. The crew has already trashed them, and I left them there for personal use:eek:
    Dave, you're right about "it's a beautiful pan" You'll have a full set before long.
    Pan
     
  10. scott123

    scott123

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    Best way to find a hot spot (either in a pan or in the oven) is to sprinkle a thin even layering of sugar over the bottom and watching where it burns.
     
  11. markv

    markv

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    I echo Suzanne's and Panini's sentiments.

    All my cookware is All Clad and it stands up to all sorts of use. I use Barkeeper's friend in conjunction with brillo, (against the manufacturer's reccomendation), but it cleans whatever burnt on crud I can produce with no problems in function.

    Mark
     
  12. skilletlicker

    skilletlicker

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    I recently broke down and bought some All Clad pieces. My grocery store didn't stock Bartender's Friend powder, which All Clad recommends, so I bought Bon Ami, which didn't work well at all. Had to scrub way to hard and long and even then it didn't completely get rid of the heat discoloration. I was afraid to use Comet for fear of damaging the pans. I regretted buying the stainless pieces until the Bartender's Friend purchased online was delivered. It seems to work well and easily. It still takes more time and effort to clean the stainless than to clean my old nonstick pots and pans. To keep pristine it seems you have to wash once to get the gunk off, then scrub with powder, then wash again to get the powder off.
    If anybody knows an easier way please share it.
     
  13. nhh1

    nhh1

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    I noticed I have these round bumps around the edge on one side of my 4 quart emeril stainless. Can anyone tell me what they are a result of? I've had it for about 20 years.
     
  14. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Dropping the pan or setting it down hard on a hard surface tends to do that.
     
  15. nhh1

    nhh1

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    Thank you for your response. It really looks like there is some warpage. I don't think it affects the pan at all. It has been a great pan all these years.
     
  16. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Are the bumps on the outside or the inside?

    Would be great to have some pix.......

    mimi
     
  17. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Warpage would immediately make me suspicious of overheating. Does it have blue color to the metal also?

    I have some older stainless steel pans (made in Canada) that started out flat (to the best of my distant recollection) but developed a bit of a domed bottom. That is a bit of a problem because sautéing is difficult. But for boiling, stewing, or steaming it really doesn't matter much.

    Neither warps nor dings necessarily makes the pan unusable.

    As Mimi said, a picture might be helpful if you want better advise that is less based on guesswork.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2015