Dalstrong knives

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by Eli Small, Aug 21, 2018.

  1. Eli Small

    Eli Small

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    I was looking at knives recently and found the dalstrong series. They looked like nice knives but I know appearances can be deceiving. I was wondering if anyone had put them to the test and what their thoughts were?
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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  3. benuser

    benuser

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  4. rick alan

    rick alan

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    The dalstrong thread was entertaining to say the least, I busted sides when one commentor described Dalstrongs as quality knives, and that he buys everyone of, not to mention another BS'r.

    The iHomeer is selling ridiculously cheap on Amazon again. There was talk of these on a reputable forum and consensus seemed to be they were easily worth the low price. AUS-10 is a very good steel, very similar to 440C, and the Chinese tend to do it well. Too bad they're not showing the 10" right now.

    But you might want to tell us what you think you are looking for exactly, how much you want to spend, and how you intend to sharpen.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2018
  5. Eli Small

    Eli Small

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    I have a Henckles Four star block that I use and my go to knife is the 8 inch chef. I was just curious to try other knives and see if I liked any of them better.
     
  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    For many years the Henkel four-star was my go-to knife. No matter what brand or profile, you’ll likely enjoy a thinner and sharper blade. And as a benefit, thinner and lighter makes a longer blade easier to use.
     
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  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    You can do much better than the Henkles for well under $100, I would say even the iHomeer for starters. But even if you spend over $300 on a knife, all dull blades are equal. Again, how do you sharpen, or how do you intend to sharpen? The final answer here will also determine what knives get recommended.
     
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  8. Eli Small

    Eli Small

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    I use what I think is a one thousand grit stone to touch up my blades when they need it. However I'm open to suggestions as to what methods could be used to sharpen
     
  9. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    King Combi 1000/6000. Forgiving, cheap, easy to soak, lots of feedback. By the time you wear through it, you'll know what you want to replace it and why.
     
  10. Eli Small

    Eli Small

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    I was looking at the Wüsthof Ikon series. I like that there's no bolster and the balance of the knife. However if I were to buy it it would be a little while until I could afford it. Are they worth it.
     
  11. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Define "worth" please... there are going to be many opinions on if they are "worth it" but those opinions may or may not apply to you. It may help if you state what criteria is important to you... no bolster and good balance in your hand is one that you stated but what else?
     
  12. Eli Small

    Eli Small

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    Good edge retention and a thinner blade. I love my Henckels however the blade is pretty heavy. The handle of the Wüsthof conformed to my hand and it just felt like it belonged, which is something else that I want. And I really want a company that has a lot of experience with knives and have a good reputation with chefs such as yourself.
     
  13. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    It sounds like you might benefit from some grip training. In a proper pinch grip the knife handle is more about a balancing mass than grip.

     
  14. rick alan

    rick alan

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    The wusty on the whole is way overpriced for what you get. I agree the handle is well thought out, thin up front and the dropping curve to the rear just begs you to use the power fingers, the ring and pinky, as they should. But the handles are heavy, and handles are way over rated in general. Anything with a coffin shape and not bulbous up front is going to work just fine so long as you employ good technique.

    Otherwise the Ikon, along with other Germans in general, is poorly conceived. Too heavy, too thick at the edge especially, too much belly and very mediocre steel. The 9" slicer isn't too bad, you can get it on ebay for $80 and perhaps less, and the mediocre steel is less of a hindrance for a slicer that will not see heavy board contact, and relatively little thinning is called for. Very handle-heavy, it feels pleasantly agile and stably put in hand, but it could stand to loose an ounce from that handle.

    Others have equally good ideas on the matter, but as a first foray into Japanese knives I typically recommend the the Geshin stainless line. Get yourself a 240 gyuto for starters. For a bit more money the Tanaka in VG-10 gets high marks. VG-10 is usually not recommended for novice sharpeners, but Tanaka does a pretty good job with heat treat on their knives.

    The 1K/6K stone is a good idea, or a 1K/3-4K. Lets you take advantage of what better steel has to offer.
     
  15. Eli Small

    Eli Small

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    When you say German knives are overhyped are you talking about the Germans take on J-knives or just German knives in general?
     
  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I don't know if German knives are overhyped, but the typical offerings certainly are under-preforming in comparison to Japanese knives, and for the reasons I stated above. And I didn't even mention the food-sticking problems because of the simple flat-sided grinds.