Cutco knives?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by pitufina73, Jun 30, 2013.

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  1. pitufina73

    pitufina73

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    hello alll!!!

    i have a cousin hooked up with Vector marketing, and she is selling Cutco knives, what do you think of them, are they a good investment???   any of you use them?  thanks in advance...

    Maria
     
  2. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    IMHO, they are overpriced by far and are definitely NOT a good investment. For the same money, there are a multitude of superior knife products available.

    BTW, my daughter sold them while at college and we did a home comparison test. My MACs were better.
     
  3. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Not impressed with them, and like Pete, feel that they are waaaay overpriced.

    Don't think much of hollow grinds on knives, and the hair stands on the back of my neck when a salesperson "guarantees" sharpness and/or free factory sharpening. 
     
  4. pitufina73

    pitufina73

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    thank you, good response, i had to look it up for MAC knives i had no idea they existed, they look wonderful!
     
  5. duckfat

    duckfat

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    Get your Googlefu on with Vector marketing and I think you will find that a lot of young people have been burned pretty hard by them.

    Setting that aside they are grossly over priced for what they are.

    Dave
     
  6. pitufina73

    pitufina73

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    In fact i did check the site, when my cousin mentioned me the company name, first i thought it was a vector art company, i feel bad for those kids getting trapped in that kind of monopoly,  well, my cousin is coming tomorrow to give me a demonstration... i just wish her luck...
     
  7. ashlynd cox

    ashlynd cox

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    My grandmother has Cutco, she has had it for over 60 years now and its still sharp. She has people come to her house for free and sharpen them. Its kinda sick really. Ive actually looked up the company and its based in Western New York. Its on Modern Marvels, like that Tv show 
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 6, 2013
  8. foodpump

    foodpump

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    With the reasons Iisted above, I can not take the knives seriously, and I will not recommend them to anyone to use.  One caveat, the bread knives can be flexed, so they are ideal to scrape grass clumps out of the lawn mower.

    Sharpening a knife is a skill that ranks up there with boning out a chicken or making cream puff paste--it needs to be learned.  There is no reason to be afraid to sharpen a knife and no need to rely on someone to do it for you.  Guarantees of "never needs sharpening" make me as suspicious as a Car company advertising that their cars never need any servicing or oil changes.

    They (cutco knives) are also waaaay overpriced for the quality you are getting.
     
  9. pahi53

    pahi53

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    Your humble opinion: I assume your GM is pleased with the knives. When people go to her house to sharpen the knives you say "It's kinda sick really" what do you mean by that?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 4, 2013
  10. pthor

    pthor

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    I guess I'm the exception to the rule...

      I love the Cutco knives that I own (But I don't love all Cutco knives).

     I have a Medium Vegetable knife and a Clever, a serrated knife that is okay. I purchased them in June this year (2013). A young man had a stand near the beach at a local car show so, I was able to see them all.

     My favorite~ The Cleaver ! Wow, this thing is very thick and heavy. With it's razor sharp edge I can place it on a chicken and slice through it bone & all like butter, with very little pressure. Then I can clean the chicken with the same cleaver as if it were made for it ! It has very good balance considering it's weight and fits well in my large hands as well as my wife's smaller hands~ (But she can't use it)!

       The vegetable knife is also very sturdy, it slices through all sorts of vegetables with the greatest of ease & is wide enough to scoop the chopped vegies to transfer. It has the same handle and is also razor sharp still after several uses~ It still shaves the hair from my arm as does the Cleaver.

        The serrated knife is also very sturdy and sharp but has seen limited use. I found it to be very effective when cutting large cooked brisket.

      Some of the Cutco knives we were shown on the day I bought the three above were very sub-par. I still find it puzzling that they were made by the same company as mine. It's almost as if they were made in China in a cost-cutting measure?

     My opinion~ Check them out but, be very cautious what you get & only buy what you'll need. Don't fall for the "If you buy these, I'll throw in this for free" sales-pitch.
     
  11. minas6907

    minas6907

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    Agreed with many of the other post above. Cutco knives are way over priced. There are plenty of crappy knives on the market, but alot of my tiff with cutco comes from the presentation they give you. A few of my friends have had worked for cutco, so I've been through it a few times. They first assume your a complete moron, then assume that you have a random hodge podge of rusty knives scattered in your drawer. The people selling the knives dont seem to know very much about knives, but are taught very well why cutco is the best, and everything else sucks. My favorite part of a particular demo was when they showed me this knife:

    http://www.cutco.com/products/product.jsp?itemGroup=3738

    Even though the knife has sharpened teeth, they assured me that it definitely was not serrated. Cutco definitely does sharpen the knives for free, but as far as I understand, you ship them to the company and then plan on eating out for the next month. I think thats a special situation with the person coming to the house to sharpen the knife, perhaps because it was purchased so long ago, could be a guarantee they are still upholding, but that is not the norm.

    A friend of mine was interested in purchasing the cleaver from cutco (no offense to the above post, just ranting on the gimmicky marketing), he excitedly told me that in each cleaver they use a full pound of steel (oh wow), because as we all know when it comes to knives, the more metal they use, the better.
     
  12. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Ok for housewives. Overpriced sales person gets almost 50% commission
     
  13. pthor

    pthor

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     Without that pound of steel- you have another knife and without that razor sharp edge you've got a hatchet. 

     That "pound of steel" is mandatory when cleaving.  Try one, you might like it...
     
  14. minas6907

    minas6907

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    I certainly have tried it and I love it! My cleaver weighs 17 oz, its a messermeister meridian elite.What I was saying is that putting a pound of steel into every cleaver seemed like the biggest selling point, I would expect that from any cleaver I'd consider purchasing. Also it should be noted (and I apologize for not doing it earlier) my friend was not going to be cleaving anything, he was interested in it to dice his carne asada, which could easily be done with a chefs knife.
     
  15. pahi53

    pahi53

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    Ask your cousin if her commission is; Excellent- Very Good -Good-Fair-or crappy, and come back with your review of the "Sales Pitch" and the quality of the knives. Of course try them out first.
     
  16. pahi53

    pahi53

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    So-would it also be okay for house-husbands?
     
  17. iceman

    iceman

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    A long time ago I sold Cutco knives. I made great money. I didn't own any then and I've never bought any since. I don't have the car I bought with the money I made either, so I guess it's an even deal. None of the people I ever sold to ever came after me, and some of the women are even friends of mine still. As far as I know, their warrantees hold true. For whatever it's worth, a lot of people are happy with Cutco.




    (I've got a lot of posts. I'm not a Cutco shill.)
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2013
  18. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Fear not, Iceman, you do have a lot of posts, and you openly admit that you sold knives.  That, I can respect.

    O.T.O.H. 'ol Ashlynd Cox dragged up the thread from 3 months ago, and dragged up another thread--"Chicago Cutlery" (no surprises there)  which gives a grand total of two posts and has not responded to any of the new replies. A shill.

    I usually do two or three trade shows a year and Cutco is usually there with their stuff, so I have had ample opportunity to see the items in person and try them out.  The kitchen knives--or "Chef"'s knives if you will, all feature a hollow grind and a remarkably thick blade, as well as a totally wierd and awkward handle.  The hollow grind is about 1/2'' wide, runs the length of the blade, and is very roughly ground.  When julienning a carrot for instance, the carrot slice was wedged and then almost split because width  from edge to the thinnest part of the hollow and then on to the regular thickness of the blade was so dramatic and very short--less than 1/2".  Think of splitting wood with an axe.  A good knife will taper the thickness of the blade to the edge gradually so cutting is smooth.  Tapering the thickness of the blade as opposed to a hollow grind is more labour intensive and expensive.....

    Virtually all of the "serious" cooking knives do not have a hollow grind.  Hollow grinds are popular on woodworking tools like chisels and plane irons and the function of the hollow is speed of honing, as these tools are honed on stones multiple times a day.  The hollow helps with registering the blade on the sharpening stone, keeping the bevel intact, as well as greatly speeding the honing process as very little metal is removed due to the "hollow".  

    Virtually all of the "serious" cooking knives have a steel or some kind of sharpening equipment in their line up or catalouge.  Cutco does not. 

    I am waiting for Ms. Cox's response...........................................
     
  19. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    http://www.cheftalk.com/t/46120/chicago-cutlery

    have you gone to Ashlynd Cox's FB page yet?  Curious, I had no idea, but maybe I'm just nieve?

    Although I am not a knife enthuisist such as everyone else here, I am not a fan of this brand.

    My knife drawer has a different make in it...
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2013
  20. dillbert

    dillbert Banned

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    >>>... and is very roughly ground. 

    curious.  I used to have the opinion that the only thing drastically "wrong" with Cutco knives was the price - accepting that, although they are not considered by most non-Cutco representatives to be "fine knives," they're useable.  as is a Ginsu.

    end of Sept went to an outdoor show - tripped over a big booth with heaps and piles and boxes galore of Cutco products - "tent" said Cutco, apparently a "show dealer." 

    if they had one knife on the table they had 3-4 thousand knives on half-a-dozen tables.

    curious that some knife makers put at least a paper sheath on the knife - these were all dumped in a box / bin like so much aaaah,,, trash.

    the one thing I immediately noticed was the "roughly ground" issue you mention.  not to be believed. 

    I was dumbfounded at the crude the edge finish and the ultra-incredibly-cheep feel of the handles/plastic.

    quite apparently the whole product line has been farmed out to the cheapest Chinese factory available.
     
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