Curry Plant

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by harpua, May 27, 2005.

  1. harpua

    harpua

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    I bought my boyfriend a "curry plant." It kind of smells like curry and is suggested for use in asian dishes. Anyone familiar with this plant? Ever use it?
     
  2. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Does it look like this Helichrysum italicum (formerly H. angustifolium)?
    [​IMG]

    It may be a suggested use but this doesn't mean it is actually used for traditional curry dishes in Asian countries. "Curry" is a catch all phrase for a mixture of spices dependent upon regional differences.

    There is a curry leaf from the Murraya koenigii plant which is used in some Asian dishes:
    [​IMG]

    Basically, expect to use Helichrysum italicum (formerly H. angustifolium) in the same ways you might use rosemary or thyme, but don't expect to use it for traditional curry dishes. ;)
     
  3. harpua

    harpua

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    Yea, I'm aware of the spice blend, but this plant made me curious. It looks like the first one..

    Mmm.. that does sound good in mayonnaise. Thanks!
     
  4. redace1960

    redace1960

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    mudbug nailed it-helichrysum italicum.
    lots of the wall-box type places were carrying them under the 'herb herbert' pop tag...rather deceptive labelling since it isnt edible. it just stinks purdy.
     
  5. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Well, technically - it is perfectly edible. It's just that it can be too easily assumed from those who don't know too much about cooking and spices that it is the origin of "curry" in curried dishes. It's more of an aromatic herb than a spice used to impart flavor.

    It is most utilized in tea and as an essential oil - "used as a flavouring to enhance fruit flavours in sweets, ice cream, baked goods, soft drinks and chewing gum."

    ;)

    Reference:
    Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants.
    Kampong Publications 1990 ISBN 0-9628087-0-9
    Excellent. Contains a very wide range of conventional and unconventional food plants (including tropical) and where they can be obtained (mainly N. American nurseries but also research institutes and a lot of other nurseries from around the world.
     
  6. redace1960

    redace1960

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    we live and learn! :)
    ....just as im composting the remains of my last one-the february flood we get here killed it. depressingly inauspicious, inarguably undelicious, and a raging bummer. :mad:
    update: went back to my source, which turns out to be a pamphlet from a grower in cali-"curry plant (botanical name) aromatic; not edible to 18in. zone 6." im going to look for your source at the library, mudbug. oh well, i got four really good, vigorous years out of my curry plants during which i was able to take cuttings in a super harsh zone eight climate. guess i can't complain. but i do, i do. :rolleyes:
     
  7. liv4fud

    liv4fud

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    don't mean to rub on old wounds :D but curry plant (also known as curry-patta) is used in dals and sambhars and some saute-ing also in Indian cookings.

    used in limited amounts, usually whole, its thrown in with the oil and thus imparts its flavor to the oil.

    you will also see the fried remains of it in various *trail-mix* type (chevda/chivda)- prepared foods that you would find in Indian grocery stores.

    does have a ton of medicinal properties (ayurveda) and a slight bitterish flavor.
     
  8. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Let's clear this up:

    As mentioned and shown with pictures in the second post of this thread above, "curry plant" is a common name for multiple plant species. In order to be accurate, you must refer to the Botanical/Latin/Scientific name to avoid confusion.

    The "curry plant" Harupa was asking about is not the same plant which yields kari patta, or "curry leaves". Although this curry plant is widely grown as an herb, and does smell like curry, it is not the same plant which has for centuries been used on the asian sub-continent in the preparation of curry dishes. The curry plant in question by Harupa is actually Helichrysum Angustifolium, of the family "Compositae", and originated in either Africa or Australia.

    The plant which yields "curry leaves" is actually Murraya Koenigii, of the family "Rutaceae", and has been described by various sources as being, "an Asiatic shrub with pungent leaves". Indian cookbooks equate "kari patta" (and it's other dialectic names) with Murraya Koenigii.
     
  9. liv4fud

    liv4fud

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    thanx for the clarification

    I was too eager to contribute...

    :bounce:
     
  10. harpua

    harpua

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    Well it doesn't matter anyhow. He didn't use it and now we're on deathwatch 2005. :p