Culinary Trivia?

Discussion in 'The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)' started by nicko, Aug 22, 2000.

  1. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Well since the Iron Chef Trivia took off so well I thought we could try some Culinary Trivia and see who can stump everyone else.

    Here is a semi-tough question:

    What did Escoffier use to clarify his fish consomme with?
     
  2. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Egg whites
     
  3. layjo

    layjo

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    I belive he states to use caviar mashed, mixed with cold fish fumet, bring up to a boil and simmer gently for twenty minutes with the pot offset of the flame in order to clarifiy. and gently pour the consomme through cheesecloth.

    -Here's one-
    What is the Indian version of clarified butter, simular in preparation to Beurre Noisette, called?

    opps! I forgot....did I get the first question right?


    [This message has been edited by layjo (edited August 23, 2000).]
     
  4. greg

    greg

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    Ghee. Next question: Why did the French name brown sauce "espagnole"?
     
  5. layjo

    layjo

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    From what i've heard....The sauce means Spanish Sauce and was named so because the ingredients that were used to make the sauce back then were the finest of those type of ingredients from Spain.
     
  6. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Layjo you are right, Escoffier used caviar when clarifying consomme. I am not sure on the naming of espagnole sauce anyone know?
     
  7. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Here is one for you all: How did the term "upper crust" of society come about? And another: Why is a Baker's dozen 13? Good luck.
     
  8. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    I am not sure about the baker's dozen, does it have something to do with the disciples?
     
  9. bayou

    bayou

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    Pete, about the "Baker's Dozen" question - I have heard that back in the 17th (or 18th) century, in Europe, there were very severe penalties for "short changing" (by weight)customers on grain items, such as rolls, buns, etc. So, the bakers started adding an extra item - just in case their scales were a little off. I've seen this explanation in more than one place - hope this helps.
     
  10. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    In southern Louisiana Lagniape is alittle extra.....does anyone know when the cajuns or Acadians started this?
     
  11. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Ok we need a re-cap, will all of the people who posted a question make sure they answered it.

    What was the answer to this question:

    What is the Indian version of clarified butter, simular in preparation to Beurre Noisette, called?

    And this one:

    Why did the French name brown sauce "espagnole"?
     
  12. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Bayou answered the one about "baker's dozen" pretty much correctly. In the Middle Ages (1300-1500) penalties were very stiff for bakers who overcharged or underweighed bread. To make sure that they would not be punished, in case their scales were off compared to the regulators, they would throw in an extra piece. Better to lose a little product than to spend a day or 2 in the pillory. Now can anyone answer the other question I posted.
     
  13. cape chef

    cape chef

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    sauce espagnole is one of the five mother sauces (the # is debated these days)but regardless what are the remaining 4 mother sauces
     
  14. cape chef

    cape chef

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    ok,, how about mangosteen
    where is it from?
    what is it?
    and what is it used for?
     
  15. layjo

    layjo

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    Sorry about that folks!....the answer to the question.
    What is the Indian version of clarified butter, simular in preparation to Beurre Noisette,
    ANSWER: Ghee, Greg answer is correct!
     
  16. greg

    greg

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    The French named brown sauce espagnole because the use of roux originated in Spain. Next question: Where did mayonnaise originate?
     
  17. isa

    isa

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    Sauce Espagnole was so named because of its brown colour.
     
  18. isa

    isa

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    Four versions of the origin of mayonnaise

    The first version, gives the credit to the Duc de Richelieu who captured Port Mahon on June 28 1756. He gave the name mayonnaise to the sauce he or his cook made for the fisrt time that night.

    Other sources think that the mayonnaise originated in Bayonne where the mayonnaise was a speciality. The bayonnaise with time became the mayonnaise.

    Carême has said that the mayonnaise is a derivation of the verb manier. At first it would have been known as magonnaise or magnionnaise.

    Prosper Montagné belived the word was a deformation of moyeunaise which came from a old french word moyeu meaning egg yolks.
     
  19. cookm

    cookm

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    How about this? Where did the Japanese get the idea for tempura from?
     
  20. nick.shu

    nick.shu

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    the portugese catholic priests staying in japan after its dicovery. Im not sure of the exact portugese dish, but it was a way of cooking the priests the obligatory friday night seafood meal.