Croquembouche Caramel Too Crunchy

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by kimmit, Mar 29, 2014.

  1. kimmit

    kimmit

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    Hi Everyone - long time since I have been on here.  I have just made a batch of Tuiles for the first time...very successful, but holy moly how time consuming is that!? I seriously think these might just be one of those things that can be happily bought.  I am catering for a "casual" wedding party in July, and me and my big mouth...have to now start practising how to make a Croquembouche!  eeek....any suggestions and advice would be great.  I have ordered some plastic cones (similar to traffic cones), as I believe you can stick the profiteroles on the inside of the cone? Watch this space.../img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif  
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2014
  2. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Hi Kimmit, when I last made a croquembouche we used a metal cones I am not certain that the plastic would work because the sugar is so hot wouldn't it melt the plastic?
     
  3. ishbel

    ishbel

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    My daughter made croquembouche for her own wedding, using the moulds made by Lakeland.
     
  4. dobzre

    dobzre

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     Croquembouches are assembled after the sugar has already solidified. They are merely arranged around the cone as a guide. So yes you can use any cone shaped medium.
     
  5. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    @Dobzre  You are much more experience than I but I swear I remember (this is years ago) that we dipped the pate choux in the sugar then placed them in the metal cone. Then when the sugar solidified this is what held it together. I am guessing that I am mis-remembering. So what holds the entire thing together after you assemble it?
     
  6. dobzre

    dobzre

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    They stack much like a honeycomb structure.
     
  7. ishbel

    ishbel

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  8. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    @Ishbel  thanks for posting that link the video is almost exactly how I remember making a croquembouche. The only thing I remember the pastry chef doing differently was it was a large metal mold inverted and he placed the pate choux inside the mold not on the outside which really seems to just be a matter of preference.

    @Dobzre  if you look at the video in the link Ishbel posted this is what I remember. Dipping the pate choux into the sugar and assembling them one at a time. This way when the sugar solidifies the whole structure stays together.
     
  9. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Nicko, your way is the method I was taught at LCB, Paris aeons ago!

    My daughter made three as table centres for her wedding in Greece a Couple of years ago. All went swimmingly, she made them the afternoon before the wedding. I noticed some ants in the villa and suggested they were stored in a kitchen cabinet..... disaster...


    We came down early, to find that the spun caramel had turned back into sugar and melted.

    Thankfully, there was a great patisserie in the next village. We drove over and they took pity on us and sold us a few large gateaux which took the place of the croquembouche!
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2014
  10. kimmit

    kimmit

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    Thanks for the comments and links everyone.  The plastic cones work well, but my problem is the caramel is too hard.  I am going to attempt one with chocolate instead of caramel.  I fear this won't work well in the middle of summer though.  I am having a lot of fun experimenting and will post pics soon. :)

    Any more ideas/comments greatly appreciated. 
     
  11. dobzre

    dobzre

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    @Nicko and pulling them apart destroys the pastries. I've made one that way before back in culinary school. DISASTER. They stick to each other, rips the profiteroles open and makes the filling start to ooze out. With each successive pull it gets worse and worse. The chef pulled me aside and said its best not to stick them together from a customer standpoint. Just stack them around the cone and secure them in place with a star piped dollop of diplomat cream or something of that sort. That may be the traditional way but i'm thinking of the functionality from a consumer standpoint. I'm a modernist, functionality trumps tradition, if tradition is cumbersome.
     
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  12. kimmit

    kimmit

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    Yup, Dobzre, that is my problem.  The caramel makes them stick too much and destroys them when trying to get them apart!  Perhaps the answer is one tower for the aesthetics, and then lots of platters of profiteroles for eating! 
     
  13. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    @Dobzre  You are so right I never would of thought of that.l have made one you obviously have the experience. Excellent call out about them sticking together so much they tear and rip. Thanks for the excellen tip.
     
  14. dobzre

    dobzre

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    If you have the patience, I would definitely make a "dummy" tower with no filling in the profiteroles for display and serve the real ones on platters.

    Guess I know what i'll do for Christmas this year!
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
  15. jadepearl

    jadepearl

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    Here's a link to  French Chef Vincent Gadan's class



    Hope this helps! :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 12, 2014
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  16. kimmit

    kimmit

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    Brilliant link thanks jadepearl! 
     
  17. kimmit

    kimmit

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    Not perfect, but it stuck together and everyone loved it.  The white around the base are white flowers.  It went down a treat, and so did the platters of profiteroles.  I made over 300 (for 70 people) and could have/should have made double that! Whew, it is over. 
     
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  18. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Beautiful!

    Now you can sit down and put up your feet.

    Have a glass of wine for me!

    mimi
     
  19. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Nice job Kimmit !

    That is exactly how I still make them.
    If kept in a cool area , there is no problem making it during the summer months. Display an hour prior to serving.
     
  20. kimmit

    kimmit

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    Thanks!