Cronut

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by petalsandcoco, Jun 21, 2013.

  1. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    A Croissant - doughnut hybrid.

    So what is all the talk about the "Cronut". For the second time this month I read about it. Has anyone tried it ? Is it as good as everyone says ? Anyone have a recipe to share ?  What's your take on it ?

     They look amazing to me.

    http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/06/19/baker-cracks-down-on-cronut-scalpers/

    Got a hankering for a cronut? Well, you’ll have to wait in line yourself.

    Dominique Ansel, who created the croissant-doughnut sensation at his eponymous bakery in New York City’s Soho neighborhood, has begun cracking down on black-market scalpers who have invaded his bakery by personally kicking them out of line.

    Ansel told Today that he’s particularly concerned about how pervasive cronut scalping has beome. “I open the door for everyone every morning at 8 a.m. And I say ‘hello’ to all my customers. It’s only a matter a time before something seems kind of shady.” He added, “It’s funny because I actually don’t have much time to stay updated on all this, but a lot of customers will actively come and tell me about scalpers or trademark violators.”

    (MORE: Cronut Craze Creates Black Market for Tasty New Treat)

    Fueled by demand and scarcity, a black market of sorts has opened up for those who are unwilling to wait in line for a fluffy croissant shaped (and deep-fried) like a sweet doughnut. Many services have sprouted up on Craigslist promising the hyped pastry for an inflated premium, often at incredible markups despite the fact that one cronut regularly sells for $5 at Ansel’s bakery. One service, Premium Cronut Delivery, charges $100 for one cronut, $200 for two and $1500 for ten cronuts if you’re feeling particularly gluttonous. The site, which adds a 950% markup for each confectionary creation, only makes five deliveries a day, and only on weekdays.

    Though each customer was originally limited to six cronuts, the bakery has further restricted customer orders to two cronuts because of burgeoning demand. For those who want a taste of what everyone has been talking about, the line can start forming as early as 5:00 am in the morning. Thankfully, because of the bakery’s new restrictions, “waiting in line for two cronuts isn’t a very profitable business,” the baker noted.

    Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/06/19/baker-cracks-down-on-cronut-scalpers/#ixzz2WqrMBrz1
     
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Looks very nice and inviting to me. I have read about this place, he can't make them fast enough  opens at 5am and sold out by 8am. The only thing is its a fad like the Hula Hoop . Soon you will be able to buy them at Walmart Bakery or Publix at about $1.99 each
     
  3. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Ed,

    If they turn up at  1.99 a dozen, I'll buy them. I love the look of them. How can someone not like the fact that it's part croissant ?

    It may be a craze like the Krispy Kreme, who knows but I'm willing to try them.
     
  4. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    What it looks like to me is just fried croissant dough. Roll out croissant dough. Cut into circles. Either you fry it directly after cutting, or you par-bake and then fry. I'd have to experiment. 
     
  5. jellly

    jellly

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    It's not quite as easy as "just frying croissant dough".  The fad is definitely catching in Las Vegas, but many places are making a poor imitation. If you try frying straight croissant dough, the result is quite oily.  The exterior has a wonderful crips-fried dough-like texture and they show a lot of potential right out of the fryer, but after it sits it just tastes too oily and the interior is a little doughy.  None of the recreations I have seen locally look like they have achieved the same texture as the original.  
     
  6. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Glad you said that Jelly that was my first thought that wouldn't all the butter just run out and be a big mess. Looks like it actually takes some skill to pull off.
     
  7. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    I recently read an article that it hit Chicago with a big price tag and they named it another name.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/featu...ut-hybrid-hits-chicago-20130624,0,60325.story

    and the line-ups...

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/bunfight-for-the-65-cronut-1985480

    Tell me it's more than just deep frying a croissant. I'm guessing by Ansel's restaurant video that it's a doughnut of sorts which is deep fried , rolled in a sugar coating,  pumped with crème pâtissière/pastry cream , and then topped off with a circle glaze.

    I saw a video of someone rolling out a croissant and even puff pastry. But there is no way that the dough could hold up to that  deep frying  in my opinion, without it collapsing. There has to be more to it.
     
  8. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I have no idea why there's such a crazy.  But I've had several friends who have camped out for this little suckers.  I'm willing to wait until the craze is over to try them.  I'm not waiting in line at 5am, I need my beauty sleep.

    There will always be a craze.  Recently there was a macaroon craze here and I had some very tasty treats.  There's also a wonderful Japanese pastry shop here called Choux Factory that makes the most divine cream puffs.  Oh god, now I need to go get a cream puff.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2013
  9. durangojo

    durangojo

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    If you can deep fry butter and ice cream (remember those fads?), you can deep fry anything!

    joey
    btw,I think they look really good....I can only hope that someone doesn't try to turn it into a bacon cheeseburger extravaganza like Krispy Kreme....that was truly and totally disgusting.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2013
  10. larrygourmand

    larrygourmand

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    Those things look amazing, but I have to say being in the UK I haven't any real buzz about them over here. Then again I'm not in London. Don't know what other British cheftalk members will say though!
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013
  11. mike9

    mike9

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    Maybe they are frozen, or near so when they hit the fat?  Either way they look heart stopping good.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013
  12. bughut

    bughut

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    If they were well chilled, they should withstand a quick, high temp fry. Looks like they're also coated, which could protect the inside during cooking too.  The plot thickens...

    Hi Larry, welcome to chef talk
     
  13. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    I made them. I just rolled out my regular croissant dough. Cut into donut shapes. Let them proof a little, but not as much as you would proof a croissant. Into the deep fryer. No oily mess. Just like a regular doughnut. They puff up in the fryer quite nicely. Right out of the fryer they have a nice crispness on the outside, but that fades away rather quickly. As they sit they do not get oilier, rather, they just stale like a regular donut. As long as you fry at the right temp (375) you shouldn't have an oily donut/cronut. I rolled mine while still hot in granulated sugar (on the sides only). I dipped some in ganache, filled some with banana pastry cream and iced with donut icing and some I left plain. They were all great, but my opinion was that they really didn't taste all that different from a yeast raised donut. I'll still make them again. The family gobbled these up in a day. 


     
  14. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Great Scots !!!

    That is what the reviews were saying, crunch on the outside and soft in the middle. Did you use ready made croissant dough or store bought ? Would it make a difference in your opinion  ? 375 till they are golden brown ? What,  about 5-7  minutes ? Shorter ?

    I look forward to more details, thank you so much for the feedback , excellent.
     
  15. colleens

    colleens

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    Wow, those look great, ChefPeon!  I am ready to try one right now!!! Beautiful.
     
  16. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Hi petalsandcoco!

    I used my own croissant dough......mixed it and rolled it in myself the previous day. Let it rest overnight, then rolled out the dough about 1/4" thick and cut into donut shapes. I even fried up the cronut holes and rolled them around in cinnamon sugar. I put the donuts on parchment paper on a 1/2 sheet pan and covered it with plastic wrap and let them proof up to the point where I could see the layers quite clearly, but not so far that if you poked it the dough would collapse (that's overproofing). I was able to pick up each cronut and place it in the fryer without it losing its shape. They fry quickly.....under 3 minutes I'd say. Once they get brown enough on the bottom, you flip 'em over and fry on the other side. I use chopsticks for flipping. Oh, with the scrap dough, I made apple "critters". Unfortunately though, the dough and apples did not hold together in the fryer! They just fell apart! So I had to bake them and they turned out pretty good. Here's a pic.

     
  17. italia

    italia

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    Isn't the Cronut just like a Kreuler?  Seems to me it's the same.
     
  18. colleens

    colleens

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    Every definition I've read about Krueller or Cruller is that it is a sweet cake dough, unraised, and deep fried. Compare that to a croissant, which is not a cake.
     
  19. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    I make Crullers with pâte à choux and as you say Colleen, very different from croissant.
     
  20. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Here’s what I would like to know…

    Where did the photo of this devilishly-delightful-fried-dough-goodness come from? 

    I mean, has someone in Chef Talk-land actually held one of these absolute wonders? 

    And did you eat it?  How was it? 

    This is what TRUE foodies call cruel and inhumane treatment, for sure!!!!!  I can’t take my eyes off of it!  And I’m still on my diet, AARRRGGGGHHH!!!   You're Killin' me!