Crispy Capers

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chefbecky, Nov 28, 2014.

  1. chefbecky

    chefbecky

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    I tried rinsing, drying well, and frying in an inch or so of hot oil, and just ended up with soft oily capers.  Anyone have a better method.  I want them to crisp.  Thanks 
     
  2. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Dry well, drop them in mixture of 1/1 ratio rice flour/cornstarch. Shake off excess. Deep fry.
     
  3. alaminute

    alaminute

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    maybe your oil wasn't hot enough? I've always just thrown some into a passé and deep fried until crispy and browned, finish with salt. I've never done a breading of any kind before but that coating sounds interesting. I wonder how it would fry with trisol or windra. I'm gonna try out your mix tomorrow, cheflayne.
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Oil is not hot enough
     
  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    It's not really a breading, just helps to dry them up a bit. Think of it more like a dusting.
     
  6. povertysucks

    povertysucks

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    A la Minute, why would you ever salt capers?!  That reminds me of salting bacon--which I had to do one time with a house-cure that wasn't correctly made.  Man, that was the only time I'll thank the Brunch Gods.  Get rid of this sub-par bacon!  Enter: hungry butthole foodies.  As for the crispy capers, the oil wasn't hot enough.  And be sure to fry in small batches and drain well.  They are incredibly awful stale or oily.  Or you could even tempura a caper berry.  That might be a cool garnish or spoonful with fish and something brown butter.  A completely different suggestion is to dehydrate them.  They make a really interesting briny powder that you can use as a finishing salt for seafood.  Kind of a little too precious, but if you have the time...
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  7. alaminute

    alaminute

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    Good call, lol, I think I was playing though how I finish most things coming out of the frier but you're absolutely right. No need to season further.