Crepe pans

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by zane, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. zane

    zane

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    I've never bought one nor ever made one...

    Regardless I'm looking to buy one.

    Am I better off with something like this:

    Or this:

    What are the positive and negatives to both styles?
     
  2. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    I just use a sautee pan.  It seems to me it would be much harder to properly regulate the heat on that unit.
     
  3. jock

    jock

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    I have no experience with the electric model. I respectfully disagree with Phaedrus though and think the only advantage to it is that it would maintain a constant temperature. Unless you are going into crepe making in a really big way I don't see a reason to keep a monster piece of equipment like that in the kitchen.

    I bought one of the steel crepe pans many years ago and I found that it did not season well and cooked the crepes unevenly - dark in the middle and underdone at the edges. The handle gets hot too so you always need a towel which can be awkward when trying to manipulate the pan.

    I finally got a heavy gauge, non stick, aluminum crepe pan from Sur la Table (same style as the steel one with shallow edge) and it works every time - even the first crepe. It cost $15 as I recall.

    Then again, if crepes are something you plan to do only once in a while, do what Phaedrus and many others do - use a non stick skillet.
     
  4. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    At first blush I don't see the advantage of a non-stick crepe pan over a regular non-stick pan.  The former would basically have no purpose except crepes where the latter will lots of other stuff, too.  In restaurants over the years I've done crepes a coupole of ways:  on a flat top with ladles in non-stick pans.  Generally I only use four or five pans at a time because I'm getting old & slow...that's as many as I can watch at once./img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif  

    Unless the top of that electric is really thick, I'm sure the batter will shock it & drop the temp.  Maybe not, as I said I haven't tried it. 
     
  5. zane

    zane

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    I ended up getting the second one, even though I've read multiple responses here and on other sites saying you can use a skillet. I'm just that way, if its something I can use and doesn't cost too much I just add it to my inventory.

    Thanks for all your help though.