creating recipes

6
1
Joined Nov 7, 2018
Hello Chef!
i am finding it difficult to create a recipes,can anyone be of help,what are the basic technics to create any recipes..
Many thanks to y'll..
 
5,277
761
Joined Oct 10, 2005
For me, a recipie comes from repetition—you make something, you like it, you tweak it and repeat it, and when you think it’s improved as much as possible, you write it down.

First come ingredients, then quantities, then procedure.

So, ingredients, I like to list them in order of procedure. So for cookies, I’d start off with butter, then sugar, vanilla, flour, baking powder, etc.

Quantities...
Here we approach a huge fork in the road: Professional recipie, and non professional recipie. The only difference between the two is that a professional has got to make a buck, and the non-pro doesn’t. That’s really the only difference. So in order to make a buck, you have to know what your ingredients cost. Since you buy your ingredients by weight, that’s how you measure them. When you cost out your ingredients you need to know the weight, not the volume. Weighing ingredients allows you to be very precise, easily repeatable, no measuring cups or spoons to wash, and very, very quick. No reason why a non-pro can’t weigh out their ingredients, because it is truly superior to measuring by volume.

Now procedure.
Start off with first things first. Does any ingredient need to be processed before hand? Beans pre-soaked, butter at room temp., this or that thawed, nuts toasted, etc?
Then it’s just a matter of doing things by order. Things like baking time, cooling time, yield, and storage conditions are important too.

Hope this helps
 
40
15
Joined May 11, 2013
I would look at how ingredients react with each other, understand the ratios of ingredients in some recipes and formulas.

\Many baking formulas are written in percentages. Figure out if you increase the amount of an ingredient what effect it would have.

Michael Rhulman wrote a great book on ratios and proportions

Use it as a basis to make adjustments.
Ratios and Proportions
 
889
524
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Are you talking about writing down a recipe that you already know or are you talking about inventing a new recipe or perhaps a riff on an already existing recipe??

If you are creating a brand new recipe, what foodpump foodpump said is spot on. Repetition is the key. The only modification I would recommend would be to write down what you did, what you used and how much for each iteration of the recipe, including any tweaks and changes. That way, you will know exactly what you did and how you did it with each attempt.

If you are writing down an already existing recipe, there's a general format you can follow that will not only make it easier for you to write down the recipe, but easier to read and follow for whoever uses it. The best way to become familiar with this format is to read a bunch of recipes from your favorite cookbook and then, try to write your a recipe following that format. Start with a simple recipe and work from there. After a while, the format will become second nature.

Good luck! :)
 
2,781
225
Joined Nov 15, 2012
Aside from advice given, it's hard top beat a perfectly cooked piece of meat with nothing but S+P, so start there. Then you can start thinking things like, "I bet this veal shoulder steak (not that this piece requires any sort of fine cook prep) will go great with a balsamic/Vermentino reduction, ground coriander and Marscapone."

Consider different styles. Italian dishes typically use few ingredients, Indian food often very many.
 
6
1
Joined Nov 7, 2018
For me, a recipie comes from repetition—you make something, you like it, you tweak it and repeat it, and when you think it’s improved as much as possible, you write it down.

First come ingredients, then quantities, then procedure.

So, ingredients, I like to list them in order of procedure. So for cookies, I’d start off with butter, then sugar, vanilla, flour, baking powder, etc.

Quantities...
Here we approach a huge fork in the road: Professional recipie, and non professional recipie. The only difference between the two is that a professional has got to make a buck, and the non-pro doesn’t. That’s really the only difference. So in order to make a buck, you have to know what your ingredients cost. Since you buy your ingredients by weight, that’s how you measure them. When you cost out your ingredients you need to know the weight, not the volume. Weighing ingredients allows you to be very precise, easily repeatable, no measuring cups or spoons to wash, and very, very quick. No reason why a non-pro can’t weigh out their ingredients, because it is truly superior to measuring by volume.

Now procedure.
Start off with first things first. Does any ingredient need to be processed before hand? Beans pre-soaked, butter at room temp., this or that thawed, nuts toasted, etc?
Then it’s just a matter of doing things by order. Things like baking time, cooling time, yield, and storage conditions are important too.

Hope this helps
thank y
 
6
1
Joined Nov 7, 2018
Are you talking about writing down a recipe that you already know or are you talking about inventing a new recipe or perhaps a riff on an already existing recipe??

If you are creating a brand new recipe, what foodpump foodpump said is spot on. Repetition is the key. The only modification I would recommend would be to write down what you did, what you used and how much for each iteration of the recipe, including any tweaks and changes. That way, you will know exactly what you did and how you did it with each attempt.

If you are writing down an already existing recipe, there's a general format you can follow that will not only make it easier for you to write down the recipe, but easier to read and follow for whoever uses it. The best way to become familiar with this format is to read a bunch of recipes from your favorite cookbook and then, try to write your a recipe following that format. Start with a simple recipe and work from there. After a while, the format will become second nature.

Good luck! :)
Hello y"ll!
A big thank you to your kind replies,really appreciated.To answer chef sgsvirgil,i have been using recipes from cooking books also from Chefs but i just thought to start building up ideas on how to create my recipes,presently i am working as chef de partie,and i believe am still growing in the profession.again thank you...
 

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