Corn Tortillas (Nixtamal vs Maseca)

643
458
Joined Apr 25, 2011
To anyone following the monthly challenge, you might have seen my most recent post and my difficulty with making corn tortillas.  I first tried to make them traditional from scratch with Nixtamal (dried corn husk and Cal (slacked lime)) and it did not go so well.  Day two I used Maseca (instant masa harina corn flour) and they turned out pretty great.

So,  my question is, Is doing the Nixtamal method correctly really worth the effort?  The texture and flavor from the Maseca was quite good, and I was happy with the result, but I wonder how much better it could be using the Nixtamal.  Also, I am usually a do as much from scratch as possible kinda guy, so there is that too.
 
4,474
421
Joined Jun 27, 2012
The lady who works at our local Fiesta Mart lunch counter makes amazing arepas.

I have asked her what her secret is (in my best busboy Spanglish) but she only smiles and shakes her head.

Who knows I may be asking her where the donkey squash is lol.

mimi
 
4,474
421
Joined Jun 27, 2012
 
The lady who works at our local Fiesta Mart lunch counter makes amazing arepas.

I have asked her what her secret is (in my best busboy Spanglish) but she only smiles and shakes her head.

Who knows I may be asking her where the donkey squash is lol.

mimi
Wanting to make my own tamales last Christmas I think I asked to purchase a lb or so of prepared dough.

Again with the same smile and cute dimples she shook her head no lol.

I guess if I was serious enuf I could find someone to translate but it has become a game between us.

mimi
 
Last edited:
33
15
Joined Dec 14, 2015
One of my Colombian students swears by Colombian corn flour called "Pan"...not that this is really from scratch, per se, but it's a puzzle piece that may or may not fit. Happy cooking.

 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
Living up in the wilds of central Wisconsin, I use masa harina (Maseca brand) for tamales, pupusas, and tortillas (when I make them).  I've wanted to try making my own masa, but what a PIA that is-did it once.  When I was in Chicago I used to be able to buy fresh masa, still warm from the grinding, but alas that is no more.  To be honest, while I can tell the difference between using masa harina and fresh masa, the differences are pretty slight, at least to me.
 
101
10
Joined Jan 3, 2013
I like your attitude of your a kind of make everything yourself kinda guy, me too! My wife likes and hates it at times, she said it takes too long sometimes.
 
643
458
Joined Apr 25, 2011
 
Sorry, all I know is that maseca is not what is used for arepas.

mjb.
Masarepa is what you want for that ;)
 
Living up in the wilds of central Wisconsin, I use masa harina (Maseca brand) for tamales, pupusas, and tortillas (when I make them).  I've wanted to try making my own masa, but what a PIA that is-did it once.  When I was in Chicago I used to be able to buy fresh masa, still warm from the grinding, but alas that is no more.  To be honest, while I can tell the difference between using masa harina and fresh masa, the differences are pretty slight, at least to me.
Thanks Pete.  I still will try to make the masa myself again, but for now I'll focus on the perfected tortilla with masa harina (Maseca)
 
643
458
Joined Apr 25, 2011
 
I like your attitude of your a kind of make everything yourself kinda guy, me too! My wife likes and hates it at times, she said it takes too long sometimes.
She is missing that it is the journey, not the destination, but it really does make the food taste better too ;)
 
5,706
569
Joined Sep 5, 2008
In case that helps? His tortillas look a bit thick compared to what I'm used to purchasing or eating at restaurants around here, but their texture looks wonderful. 

 

Latest posts

Top Bottom