Corn groats

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cnumbers, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. cnumbers

    cnumbers

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    I was in an ethnic foods store in San Francisco and bought a bag of corn groats because they corn was so yellow and wholesome looking. I didn't know what to do with them but used them to make polenta by basically boiling them in salted water. The result was far superior to the finer grind of corn for traditional polenta. It has a chewer bite and lots more corn flavor. I wanted to see if there were other or more traditional uses but after a lengthy search on the Internet didn't find a single recipe! Are there any Russian cooks out there who could share some recipes and uses?
    Thanks
     
  2. coup-de-feu

    coup-de-feu

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    I don't know about any Russian recipes, I think corn is an American thing and if you want some classic recipes you should research native American and native mexican.  The settlers in the US implemented the use of corn because it was already here and it is good.  There was no english word for corn, before corn came to mean corn it meant any small little grain or pebble thing - like how we still say pepper corns.  "Polenta" use to be called "mush", or "fried mush" until someone got the idea to give it a more appealing name.  Not sure, but I think polenta is Latin for any boiled seed meal.  

    If you cook polenta in a stock instead of water it improves it.

    CDF
     
  3. justin elkins

    justin elkins

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    There are many ways I can see using this product.  I just bought some myself (also at an ethnic food shop here in Houston).  I just had a bowl of it with butter, honey and cream — AWESOME!  I could see serving it under meats like a polenta, but man!  You can fold a lot of lovely ingredients into this one!  tomatoes, garlic, roasted peppers, mushrooms, nuts, etc.  They would make an excellent polenta style lasagna or stuffed into a tomato with garlic, parmesan and basil. (Be sure to cook first!)  You did the right thing to snatch them up.  We both did.  Now, go get creative!  I am.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2013
  4. gungasim

    gungasim

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    heres some corn i grew in my garden last year

    as for shopping i pick up any extra i need at Wards or shoprite when on sale, my wife holds the purse strings and doesnt give me much of an allowance :blush:
     
  5. mike9

    mike9

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    They look like coarse ground grits to me.  Bob's Red Mills brand are coarse and very good.  I cook them in milk.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2013
  6. tomago

    tomago

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    I'm curious how do you keep the racoons from getting your corn? They are very bothersome to me. Every time the corn is almost ready they swoop in and get it. I gave up after a few tries. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/mad.gif
     
  7. dutch oven

    dutch oven

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    Chipmunks nail my garden every year. I hate them... drowning is too good for them.
     
  8. tomago

    tomago

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    Don't even get me started on chipmunks. I can't even count how many tomatoes they've ruined /img/vbsmilies/smilies/mad.gif
     
     
  9. dutch oven

    dutch oven

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    You can still make salsa or bruschetta out of those.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2013