Cooking with Wet Hops

2
0
Joined Jul 19, 2018
I've come into a half pound of wet Cascade hops I'm going to use for some non-beer applications. I've come across mustard recipes and marinades that seem pretty safe bets. Risotto with hop shoots sounded the most enticing, but I only have the flower/cones. The aromas and flavors are very citrusy. Here is what I'm considering making, but I would welcome any input from anyone with more experience or a sense of direction. These recipes are merely from googling.

Mustard with Wet Hops: I'd either grate hops into the mustard or extract it into a liquid and use that. I'd prefer to use the actual hop material and not just an infusion. That said, I really like the vinegar infusion posted on here by Chrisbelgium and think that might work well here.

Deep fried hops: similar to how brussels sprouts can be deep fried, whole, just the plant into the oil. I'm not sure what oil temperature would be preferable, as these hops I have are not at all cruciferous.

Any hops recipes youve ever seen that you've really enjoyed or wanted to try?
 
2,619
230
Joined Mar 21, 2008
Hop cones are VERY bitter regardless of how they smell...

Hop shoots are lime asparagus and I eat the cuttings off mine in spring.

Never heard of hop mustard either...

Extracting in simmering vinegar for 5 minutes max will keep the bitterness to a minimum, or better yet bring to a boil, then off the heat add hops and let it steep as it cools. That will extract flavor and aroma with minimal bitterness.
 
2
0
Joined Jul 19, 2018
Hop cones are VERY bitter regardless of how they smell...

Hop shoots are lime asparagus and I eat the cuttings off mine in spring.

Never heard of hop mustard either...

Extracting in simmering vinegar for 5 minutes max will keep the bitterness to a minimum, or better yet bring to a boil, then off the heat add hops and let it steep as it cools. That will extract flavor and aroma with minimal bitterness.
89
Hop cones are VERY bitter regardless of how they smell...

Hop shoots are lime asparagus and I eat the cuttings off mine in spring.

Never heard of hop mustard either...

Extracting in simmering vinegar for 5 minutes max will keep the bitterness to a minimum, or better yet bring to a boil, then off the heat add hops and let it steep as it cools. That will extract flavor and aroma with minimal bitterness.

I've recipes that suggest apple cider vinegar, white wine vinegar, but I really want to let the hop extraction come through. I was thinking of using rice vinegar. Is there a type you'd think best for this application?
 
2,619
230
Joined Mar 21, 2008
I would choose the vinegar based on the desired flavor profile. The acidity is going to have little impact on extracting the hop flavor/aroma.
 

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