Cooking very tender beef?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by blacksunrise, Dec 16, 2005.

  1. blacksunrise

    blacksunrise

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    Culinary Student
    I love cooking mexican food, and i want to start using proper beef in some of the meals, Though im not sure how to cook the beef so it melts in your mouth just about, and is easy to pull appart to go into burritos and things like that.

    Any ideas? i assume its boiled for a while but i have no clue on going about it.
     
  2. suzanne

    suzanne

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    You don't have to use fancy meat; in fact, round, rump, flank, and shoulder work splendidly. The key to tenderness for any meat, especially a cut that does not have a lot of fat running through it, is gentle cooking. Simmer, don't boil. Put the piece of meat in water or beef broth to cover, add onion, garlic, chillies, cumin seeds, etc. Bring up to a boil but immediately turn the heat down so the water barely bubbles. After a couple of hours, you'll have exactly what you're looking for. AND a delicious broth, as well!

    Braising is another way to get tender meat. First brown the piece of meat on all sides in a little fat over high heat, then add the liquid, flavorings, etc. and cook the same way.
     
  3. praties

    praties

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    I don't think you're going to want to boil it. It'll wind up tougher than an old boot. Think pot roast--brown your meat well, poor off the fat and then cook it with a small amount of liquid and whatever flavor components you want (onion probably for sure, some adobo from a can of chipotles if you like a hotter smoky flavor, or whatever strikes your fancy) either covered in a pot or wrapped in foil in a 300 degree oven for 2-3 hours depending on the size of the roast.

    Sorry...I think that last sentence probably broke some law or other against over-length. :smiles: I do this same thing, though, for either pork or beef for shredded meat here at home.

    Praties