Cooking risotto on the line

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by linecook854, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. linecook854

    linecook854

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    I would like to hear other cook's process of cooking risotto behind the line. I'm not quite satisfied with my own so please give a step by step of how you guys do it (assuming you start with par-cooked arborio/whatever risotto you use). I'm a bit of a perfectionist so if you make a killer risotto I want to know how to do it too.

    Thank you!
     
  2. squirrelrj

    squirrelrj Banned

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    I assume we all use parred Risotto, held for service.

    I bring it back up on the heat with stock, chx/veg/fish, let it simmer out the liquid, finish it with whatever i'm using (lobster, truffles, peppers, mushrooms, etc) and I also finish mine with creme' fraiche and powdered parm cheese and a hefty pinch of herbs and some salt and white pepper, if needed.
     
  3. linecook854

    linecook854

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    Thank you RJ,

    I have never heard of using hot held risotto, I have only used it straight out of the fridge. Is your place high volume?
     
  4. ericb

    ericb

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    Squirrel nailed it, but I use butter instead of creme freesh.. I like it though  I am going to try it out..
     
     
  5. squirrelrj

    squirrelrj Banned

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    What? I didn't say it's held hot, it's held cold in the station in a 9 pan, then hot stock added to it in a sauce/saute pan, whatever i'm cooking it in.
     
  6. linecook854

    linecook854

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    Haha I just realized I read that wrong. After letting the risotto sit a minute, before plating, does anyone else notice a change in the texture, like it absorbs more liquid? It almost seems like I should cook it to the perfect consistency then add a little more stock to compensate for the absorption.
     
  7. adamburgerdavis

    adamburgerdavis

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    I cook it much like RJ for a side to a meal but if it is an appetizer or entree all by itself I use a small amount of light cream right before its finished with butter. It makes it very creamy but doesn't do well on a plate because it spreads too much.
     
  8. squirrelrj

    squirrelrj Banned

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    Yea, i've tried all ways, cream, butter, and I found so far this method works best, for me atleast.

    And yes, the texture/consistancy is going to change, if you get the cook right, you could hold "leftover" risotto in a pan and rehydrate it for an hour or so after it's cooked, add some stock to it and a touch more fat and it will come right back, so long as you didn't cook the heck out of it on the original pickup.

    Clearly that isn't ideal, but if you're slamming busy and you need to just throw 4-5 orders in a sauce pan to stay up on your orders, it can work. IMO, if you don't cook it too hot or overcook it, risotto is very forgiving when working with it during service.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  9. recky

    recky

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    I've never tried it yet, but in Italy, they cook the risotto to "almost al dente", then spread it out on large trays so that it cools off very quickly. At service they finish off with stock, parmesan, butter and everything else that goes into the particular dish.
     
     
  10. tjsbeer

    tjsbeer

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    @Recky that's the way I do it. Comes out perfect.
     
  11. squirrelrj

    squirrelrj Banned

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    Yep, par cook it, cool it down on a sheet pan, ready to go for service.