Cooking rice?!?!?!?!?!!?! HELP!!!!!

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by scribble, Feb 28, 2018.

  1. scribble

    scribble

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    I can't cook a pot of white Rice to save my life. It is always gummy and paste like.

    I use bagged white long grain rice, rinse the rice thoroughly before cooking and always to a ratio of 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water and a pinch of salt. I put all items in a 4 qt non stick pot and start cooking uncovered till i get a good boil going, then reduce to a simmer and cover for about 20 min or until all moisture is absorbed (or as best as I can tell). I then remove from heat and try and fluff and it is always paste like.

    What am I doing wrong??? (please don't say but a rice cooker as I don't have room for any thing new in this kitchen)
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I think you're using too much water. Go ahead with what you're doing but use a cup and a half instead of 2 cups. Bring to a boil, cover, reduce heat to low. cook 15 minutes covered. Turn heat off and keep covered 5 more minutes. Fluff and eat.

    You might need to go as low as 1 1/4 cup water if your rinse is a long one.
     
  3. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It depends on what you’re looking for. Difference rice will yield different results. Long grain Carolina rice tends to turn into mush pretty easily and I find it good for certain dishes.

    To tell you the truth I quite like uncle bens par boiled rice. It’s hard to overlook it, the grains of rice stay separate from each other and it has a nice chew. But that’s just a personal preference so what do you enjoy about rice?

    One of the easiest ways to cook rice is to cook it like pasta. Throw the rice into a big pot of boiling water, cook until desired doneness and then strain in a colander. Can’t get it wrong.
     
  4. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    The basic rule for cooking rice is 2 to 1 water to rice ratio. If the rice is real starchy make sure you rinse the rice until the water runs clear. This may take a few times. I cook my rice for at least 45 minutes. I bring the water to a boil add salt and some butter and then throw in the rice. I then cover the pot and lower the temp to low or simmer for at least 45 minutes. It could be the low or simmer on your stove is to low. They putting the temp up a bit. You could also bake your rice in a casserole dish. This may help with not having a direct heat hitting the bottom of the rice making it stick to the pan. If you rice is sticky and starchy it can also affect the taste. try using chicken stock inlace of the water for more flavor. The chicken stock could also add a bit of fat to help in the process of get the results you desire........ChefBillyB

     
  5. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    The diversity in rice cooking is fascinating. I use a 2:1 ratio water to rice for Calrose but 1.5:1 for basmati. Always simmer 15 min and rest off heat for 15. Perfect rice every time.

    And I never rinse rice
     
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  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    So many ways, many of them good. My preferred method is and always will be the risotto start. No rinse. Sauté the rice then add the liquid.

    I soak basmati rice for up to an hour before cooking changing the water a few times. That’s another method.
     
  7. butzy

    butzy

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    I use 1.5 water to 1 rice. This is for Jasmine rice.
    Like @brianshaw , I hardly ever rinse rice. If I do, I use less water.
    Put on a high flame till it boils. Give it one stir, cover and move to lowest heat source. In my case, that's the lowest gas burner, with 2 flame diffusers on it. When I hear the lid going (meaning it boils again), I turn of the heat (normally 5 to 10 minutes) and just let it stand till the rest of the food is ready.
    Only then, open the lid and fluff the rice.
    Works for me...

    Try the different ways as described above. If it fails, follow @koukouvagia 's suggestion and go for par boiled rice. You can't go wrong!
    Another way is boiling in plenty water for about 15 minutes, then drain and put in a steamer.
     
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  8. theaterman

    theaterman

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    I agree with the "so many variables" comments. Baking pan methods (9x13 at least) in oven are the most stable for any real dinner-party quantity. Asian rices are softer and more open to water penetration, so yes, Basmati will take less water especially after rinsing. Thai or Jasmine rice is even softer and requires much less water to start and shorter, more delicate, cooking. It helps to keep a chart (once you finalize on all other variables) like @brianshaw mentions above, of water:rice proportions for every type rice we cook.
     
  9. someday

    someday

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    The pilaf method helps too. You basically saute your rice in some oil until it gets hot (but not colored) and then add your liquid. This helps keep each grain of rice separate from each other. You can add things like onion/shallot, garlic, etc to the saute stage if you wish.
     
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  10. nginear

    nginear

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    I'm like a lot of folks here and use a 2:1 water/rice ratio. I bring the water to a boil, add rice (unrinsed), cover, put on lowest heat, and leave it for 20 min. After the 2o is up, if needed, just move pan, cover and all, to somewhere else until rice is needed. Take off lid, fluff, serve.
     
  11. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    Rice is very important to me. So many cultures globally depend on it and have their own varieties and methods of preparation. When I make rice, I try to make it as close as possible as anyone's grandmother from whatever part of the globe that they're from. Failing with a new type of rice preparation really vexes me. Here is what I've learned.

    Long and short grain American white rice: 1.5:1 (water:rice). I start with rice in cold water, bring to boil, reduce to medium until 75% of water evaporates. I cover, reduce to low and time 20 mins. At the end of the 20 mins., I turn off the flame and uncover for 10 seconds. Place cover back on and let rest for 5-10 more minutes. At this point, I recommend fluffing and transferring to a serving container. I've found that without the fluffing and transfer, the rice at the bottom of the pot will cake, creating an undesirable cakey consistency. Keep covered.

    Basmati: 1.33:1 Same process as above.

    Jasmine: 1.25:1 Same

    Parboiled: 2:1 Same, except cooking time is 25 minutes.

    I also have made Mexican rice (Arroz con Carne, Arroz con Puerco, Arroz Mexicano) using each of the varieties above. Using just enough oil to coat the bottom of the pan (we're not frying the rice, just toasting), add rice just as oil starts to smoke. Flip and turn until a golden color and the nutty aroma of golden rice is achieved. Regardless of ingredients, for this method, when the tomato sauce (or any other liquid) is added, make sure to subtract the same volume of water from the recipe as the amount of tomato sauce that you're going to put in. For instance:

    2c of long grain American white rice gets 3c of water, but I'll use 8oz of tomato sauce, so the water volume would be 2c. Same process as above with the plain white rices. I've achieve fantastic results every time.

    The pots I use to cook the white rice and the arroz are stainless.
     
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  12. chefross

    chefross

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    I agree and I do add chopped shallots and minced garlic but I DO saute the rice until it is slightly colored (not brown) and gives off a nutty flavor, before I add my stock.
     
  13. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Is it called thenpilaf method? I’ve always called it the risotto method for lack of a better term.
     
  14. someday

    someday

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    They are basically the same until you add the liquid...pilaf rice is toasted in oil and then simmered/steamed like "regular" rice. Risotto is stirred with the liquid added over time.

    I think we are talking about the same thing. The smell of the rice is a good indicator, agreed. My rule of thumb is when I take a pinch of the rice it is VERY hot. If I can pinch it and it doesn't burn me, I keep toasting it.

    I was taught this was called "nacre" but it seemed a little esoteric to mention it, so I didn't.
     
  15. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    Esoterica is what separates us from the turn-n-burn burger flippers, no?

    From here on in, you should share all esoteric terms. It's what we do.

    Peace!
     
  16. drirene

    drirene

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    I used to get into trouble before figuring out that washing the rice adds extra water. Now I always use less than stated amount on the box and it comes out well.

    One other tip is to turn off the flame at the end of the cooking time and quickly slip a couple sheets of paper towels between the pot and the lid. Let it sit on the burner for 5 minutes before fluffing.
     
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  17. The Nosey Chef

    The Nosey Chef

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    I find this depends on what you want. If I want rice I can eat with chopsticks, then I make it sticky. This is done with basmati rice (not long grain). That is cooked exactly as you do. One volume of rice to two volumes of water, boiled, covered, put on mega-low (absolutely the lowest you can do) for 15 mins, then heat off, and left for another 10 mins. That gives me sticky chopstick rice. Please note that there is NO SALT in that. Salt causes huge problems with the chemistry of rice.

    If I want to go all Paul Bocuse, then I wash the rice until the water runs clear and then cook the same way. This gives a more separated rice, but I can't get hold of it with a chopstick.
     
  18. The Nosey Chef

    The Nosey Chef

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    I subscribe to the resting.
     
  19. drirene

    drirene

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    On rinsing rice:

    I rinse my rice very well since reading an article in Consumer Reports a few years ago. Rice is coated with arsenic because rice paddies throughout the world (everywhere!) are contaminated. Brown rice contains more arsenic than white. Rinsing significantly reduces arsenic levels.

    I no longer eat rice in restaurants because I don't know how it was prepared.
     
  20. someday

    someday

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    How is every Japanese or Chinese person not dead???

    I think as long as you aren't eating an astounding amount of rice every day your risk from arsenic is minimal. Low levels of arsenic are found in a lot of foods and aren't really a cause for concern, unless (again) you eat a huge amount of said food.

    Eating rice in a restaurant isn't going to give you arsenic poisoning.
     
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