Cooking Range Recommendations

1
0
Joined Feb 27, 2018
I needs to buy a cooker for home use, it's going to be used for Chinese cooking so the gas needs to be strong and also need to bake cakes, so I wanted to get a dual fuel.

Can anyone recommend a cooker? I always find the gas is not very strong in the UK, but i don't know if that's the supply or the cooker. Please can you help?

My budget is £1000

Thanks

Ying
 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
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Joined Mar 29, 2002
From what I've seen in the US at least your price range won't support dual fuel. I'd look at induction as well for high output for Chinese stir frying. Europe has better choices in that than the US does but again that's usually more expensive.

For your budget you might do better to buy a dedicated Wok induction burner and then a regular electric range.
 
5,692
540
Joined Sep 5, 2008
I just transitioned from gas to induction.

The problem with induction is that the instant you lift your pan from the cooktop, the pan is no longer heated. So if you do a lot of lifting, shaking, sautéing etc... you will probably have to readjust your gestures.
 
1,832
539
Joined Aug 15, 2003
I just transitioned from gas to induction.

The problem with induction is that the instant you lift your pan from the cooktop, the pan is no longer heated. So if you do a lot of lifting, shaking, sautéing etc... you will probably have to readjust your gestures.

I'm confused...if you take your pan off of a gas burner it is no longer heated either. It's not like the pan doesn't retain heat...
 
5,692
540
Joined Sep 5, 2008
I'm confused...if you take your pan off of a gas burner it is no longer heated either. It's not like the pan doesn't retain heat...
Not take the pan off the burner – just lift. On a gas burner I can lift the pan slightly, tilt it to spoon off some fat to baste, shake the pan, sautée stuff... without having much impact on the way the pan is heated. With induction, the instant the pan is no longer in perfect contact with the cooktop, it's no longer heated.

I can actually feel/see a big difference while cooking and have had to adapt my methods a bit.
 
Last edited:
1,832
539
Joined Aug 15, 2003
Not take the pan off the burner – just lift. On a gas burner I can lift the pan slightly, tilt it to spoon off some fat to baste, shake the pan, sautée stuff... without having much impact on the way the pan is heated. With induction, the instant the pan is no longer in perfect contact with the cooktop, it's no longer heated.

I can actually feel/see a big difference while cooking and have had to adapt my methods a bit.

I've used induction many times and never noticed much of a difference. I understand what you're saying though.
 
5,692
540
Joined Sep 5, 2008
I think it's more noticeable when the heat is on high. For example when sautéeing potatoes on high heat. With gas I could sauté and sauté until the cows come home, but with induction I sauté once or twice and quickly put the pan back flat against the cooktop so that it doesn't lose any heat.
 
28
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Joined Nov 10, 2017
A gas range for £1000 is a tall order. I would see what you can do with Britannia. Available from John Lewis.
 

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