Cooking a Filipino Dish

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by bennetto33, Apr 26, 2018.

  1. bennetto33

    bennetto33

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    I’m planning to cook for my girlfriend when I visit her. I met my girlfriend about 3 years ago through a foreign matchmake tour and I have been visiting her from time to time. Next month, I’m planning to visit her again. She loves cooking for me whenever we get together but this time, I really want to cook a Filipino dish for her. My problem is that I’m not sure what dish would be best and easiest to prepare. Do you guys have any suggestions?
     
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  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Risky because it won't match what she's used to regionally. Rather have her teach you the dish but you have to do all the cooking. Pancit would be my recommended starting point. Learn to make it how she likes it.
     
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  3. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    "Memories of Philippine Kitchens" by Amy Besa is a pretty good book if you're looking to make this a long term relationship.

    For a quick fix, "The Filipino-American Kitchen" by Jennifer Aranas is quite decent.
     
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  4. poklet

    poklet

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    Hi,

    I am from Philippines. As a Filipino, I highly recommend pork adobo(a soy sauce based pork recipe) there's a lot of variation of this recipe depending from which your girlfriend lives.
     
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  5. seabeecook

    seabeecook

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    Am I to understand that she's in The Philippines? Where does she live? Understanding her local/regional cuisine will help you to dial-in your ideas. @phatch pancit advise is good.

    Pancit, or noodles, is a great starting point. Not to confuse, there are scores of pancit variations. Pancit bihon is prepared with rice sticks, pancit canton with wheat noodles, pancit malabon with achuete and fish/fish sauce, etc. I prepare bihon frequently at home and at my summer camp. My favorite Filipino dishes are pancit, adobo, sinigang and lumpia.

    There are plenty of Internet articles on Filipino cooking. Here's a sampling:

    http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/07/what-is-filipino-food-cuisine.html

    http://www.brenontheroad.com/food-frenzy-classic-filipino-dishes-philippines/

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/melissaharrison/delicious-filipino-foods

    http://www.manilaspoon.com/p/filipino-recipes.html

    http://panlasangpinoy.com/

    http://pigpartsandbeer.com/

    Here's an article that may help you understand the idiosyncrasies of Filipino cooking:

    http://opinion.inquirer.net/41202/7000-islands-with-28000-adobo-variations
     
  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Taker her out to a fancy restaurant... or cook something from your culture if you want to impress her. Cooking in someone else's culture often leads to disappointment due to unfamiliarity (or faked gratitude) but in the long-run it could be counterproductive.
     
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  7. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    It sounds like a good idea but it's not. Take her out to a nice restaurant. There is no way in Hell you could come close to making any dish close to being what she grew up eating. Every country is the master of their own cuisine. Leave the cooking to her. If you want to do something go out and kill a wild boar throw it over your shoulder and walk out of the jungle. This will show her she has the man of her dreams and a good provider.......
     
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  8. french fries

    french fries

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    That's very funny... and probably a little true too.

    I agree that it's not a good idea to cook HER cuisine. Cook yours instead. Make a typical American meal but make it right. A great hamburger and some fried or grilled potatoes can be something wonderful if done right and perhaps with a little twist (caramelized onions? Confit bacon? Pickled green tomatoes?....).
     
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  9. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I remember visiting a family in the Deep South. They invited me to dinner. My family is New English (and they knew it). There were two dinners on the table: southern and “new-English”. Country ham, cornbread, etc on their end of the table; over cooked pork chops slathered with catchup and mashed potato on my end of the table. To be polite I ate the food they cooked for me. I was miserable, and so were they having to see me eat the “ foriegn food they cooked to please the foreign guest”.
     
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  10. french fries

    french fries

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    That's so sad! :(

    I can't imagine any non-French people cooking French cuisine for me and making me happy. I'm already very, very hard on many French cooks!!!!

    On the other hand, I can imagine people cooking their own cuisine and making me very happy. Vietnamese, Mexican, African, Swedish, Polish, Russian, Indonesian.... please do cook food from where you're from, my tastebuds are ready!!! :D
     
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  11. ikirumata

    ikirumata

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    Asuming you are American...my parents are from the Philippines and from what I gather about filipino culture, cooking a genuine American meal would actually be very well received. Not only that, cooking something that you like to eat will say more about who you are than trying to cook a meal you don't know. What if you do a bad job? Is this the kind of food that this person likes?

    Good luck!
     
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  12. iceman

    iceman

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    So far everyone's suggestion has been correct and safe. I've got NO arguments there. But hey ... the guy came here asking a question of us so-called experts in the queisiny department. Maybe we should try and help him out a little better.
    Now I've got this special app on my MAC that I used. It's called ... Google. ... I came up with this, it should work just fine:

    PHILIPPINE PAELLA ... (it's really easy)
    paella.jpg

    1 HOUR, 30 MINUTES
    Ingredients:
    2 cups jasmine rice
    1 cup sticky rice
    Olive oil
    5 cloves garlic, minced
    1 small Spanish onion, minced
    8 oz. chorizo, sliced
    1⁄4 cup tomato paste
    1/2 tbsp. smoked paprika
    4 cups chicken stock
    1 cup clam juice
    1 cup coconut milk
    6 manila clams
    6 mussels
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    6 head-on prawns
    1⁄4 cup sliced scallions
    2 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and quartered
    Cilantro leaves, to garnish

    Instructions:
    Combine rices together, then rinse under cold running water until the water runs clear.
    Heat 1/4 cup oil in a 12-inch skillet; add garlic and onion and cook until soft, 8–10 minutes. Transfer to a blender, then purée until smooth ... or not, grate the garlic and onion with a micro-plane or cheese grater and just skip the blender part.
    Heat 1⁄4 cup oil over medium-high and add prawns. Cook prawns until pink and cooked through, turning once, about 3 minutes. Transfer prawns to a plate.
    Heat 1⁄4 cup oil in a paella pan over medium-high; add chorizo and cook until golden, 5–7 minutes.
    Add rice and cook for 2 minutes. Add the tomato paste, and paprika and cook 2 minutes more. Add stock, clam juice, and coconut milk and continue cooking until the rice is slightly tender, about 35 minutes. Add the clams, cover, and cook 10 minutes, until the clams begin to open. Add the mussels, and cook, covered, about 5 minutes more. Season with salt and pepper and keep warm.
    To serve, top paella with prawns, scallions, eggs, and cilantro.

    Use quality ingredients and take your time, you'll have nice left-overs. Cook everything in one(1) pan. You don't need a paella pan, a large high-sided sauté pan will work fine.




    "We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2018
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  13. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I think there's a typo of when your 6 lb of mussels. I think they mean six mussels

    That pesky number sign hashtag can mean too many things
     
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  14. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I see 11 mussels... and 12 clams... and 12 egg quarters

    ... so much for googled recipes. ;)
     
  15. iceman

    iceman

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    So much for wisecrack comments. The guy is cooking for 2 people ... not the 6 people of the original recipe/pic.
     
  16. doraima3875

    doraima3875

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    Maybe you should do chicken adobo, or pancit for starters.
     
  17. chefross

    chefross

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    I love Pancit....care to share your recipe please.
     
  18. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Noted! But here's a dilemma, I have an unwavering urge to cook italian food for italian people. I don't know why. I can't help it.

    I absolutely hate cooking greek food for greek people. Because if it's not exactly how their mother made it...
     
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  19. doraima3875

    doraima3875

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    Here is a link that offers a lot of Filipino recipes similar to recipes that I cook at home:https://www.filipinorecipesite.com/filipino-recipes

    Intro to Pancit: https://www.filipinorecipesite.com/filipino-pancit-recipe
    https://www.filipinorecipesite.com/filipino-pancit-recipe/pancit-canton-2.html
    Chicken Adobo:
    https://www.filipinorecipesite.com/filipino-adobo-recipe/adobong-baboy.html
    On the Filipino Adobo, I would use the ratio of soy sauce to vinegar 2:1 = 1/2 cup soy sauce to 1/4 cup vinegar. I also add a lot of garlic to this dish. You want some sauce in your dish, not swimming with your pork and chicken. You need to reduce the sauce to infuse a lot of flavors coming together.
     
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  20. iceman

    iceman

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    Give or take any Italian ... French ... Whatever dish ... from whatever part of wherever you chose of those countries ... go within a three(3) click radius from any given town, hamlet, village ... you'll find 741 different recipes for the exact same authentic dish.

    Therein is why some people have difficulties eating any given cuisine. I don't apologize for anything I make.



    "We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
     
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