Cookbook for a college son?

Discussion in 'Cookbook Reviews' started by jill reichow, Nov 23, 2001.

  1. jill reichow

    jill reichow

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    I am turning to all you far wiser than I folks for some help. My 21 yr old son lives in an apt. at college and has decided that he needs a cookbook. He doesn't need the "Help my apt. has a kitchen"book(which I'm told really exists), but isn't in need of Mastering the Art of French Cooking either. He has a good basic grasp of cooking, but wants to expand his mealtimes, so to speak. I think we can do without the sides of baking and desserts, and focus more on the basic meal ideas. He's a meat eater, loves rice potatoes and pasta, veggies are a neccesary evil (unless it's asparagus or broccoli). Remember he is in an apt. of guys and the cupboard is fairly mundane. He told me he wants to "expand on the basic equations of flavors" and to learn how to "integrate new spices and mixes into the equations." He's a computer science major, what can I say? Any reasonably priced suggestions? TIA.
     
  2. mofo1

    mofo1

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    This one very, very simple. "The Joy of Cooking." It it ain't in there. You probably wouldn't want it anyway. The best all around cookbook I know of.
     
  3. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    I owe the best cook book for amateurs , given to me as a gift from my best Internet friend that he lives in the Italian speaking part of Switzerland ( I love you tall one! :) )

    This book contains the most interesting recipes but the originality is the following. It doesn't have words!!! It has just images!!!! But it's the best the most easy to use cook book.You , Americans will love it!!

    hHere is the reference

    Lilia Burani, Ricette senza Parole

    Kitchen without words!Try to trace it in an on-line bookstore! It worths the try!!


    PS I will scan a recipe right now!!
     
  4. kimmie

    kimmie

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    Sauces or Essentials of Cooking come to mind, by James Peterson.

    Click here

    :rolleyes:
     
  5. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    I would recommend Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything. There are very few omissions (spoonbread and oyster stuffing are the only ones that come to mind.) Bittman's writing style is very accessable and the recipes are well tested. The instructions are clear and he gives many suggestions for fun variations on the recipes.
    Of course, Joy of cooking is a good one too, but can be a bit much for someone new to the craft. I find James Pederson's recipes a bit "cheffy" for the average guy cook.
    Good luck!
     
  6. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Fifty Ways to Cook Almost Anything by Andrew Schloss comes to mind. It tackles the basics like different preparations for meatloaf, saucing pasta, baking chicken, etc. without getting too technical. Jacque Pepin's Simple and Healthy Cooking is a bit more adventurous while not being too rediculously involved. Lastly, Charlie Trotter's Cooks at Home is great food done simply. Click here to read the review.
    Good luck!
     
  7. suzanne

    suzanne

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    I also vote for Joy of Cooking. Mofo1 said it all:



    Should we do a poll?
     
  8. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Sure.....I agree Joy of Cooking....but the one I use the most is an older copy...the newer one is ok, but doesn't have several favorites in it.
     
  9. marzipan

    marzipan

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    I'd suggest the Better Homes & Gardens Cookbook- the infamous red & white checkered one.

    We gave that one to my brother when he moved out, and it certainly reduced the number of phone calls I received, asking me how to carve a turkey/brown meat/etc.
     
  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    "Bistro Cooking" by Patricia Wells. This book is great for a 21 year old out on his own. Yes, it is a French cookbook, but the redipes really relate to a meat and potatoes kind of crowd (and I know that college kids can definately be that). Recipes for potato and sausage salad, simple stews, roast chicken, a whole chapter devoted to potatoes. Most of the dishes, while sounding exotic with their french names are very down to earth. And yet he can still find that great little recipe for impressing a date!!
     
  11. compassrose

    compassrose

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    Yeah, I'd vote for Better Homes rather than the Joy. I've got both, but BH has a new edition out, with step-by-step diagrams of a lot of procedures. (I also remember that it was the mainstay of my ex-boyfriend, who was a reasonably competent cook.) It's more accessible, I think.

    I use the Joy, myself, not so much when I want to branch out, but when I want a foundation reference for a basic procedure - f'rinstance, when I'm comparing two different "fancied-up" recipes and want to know what the essential bits are.

    And I wouldn't dis Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Julia Child would probably be not a bad choice. She also is very accessible, amusing to read, and breaks down the seemingly complicated into procedures most people can accomplish. Many people count in their repertoires a number of staple recipes out of Julia Child.
     
  12. jill reichow

    jill reichow

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    Thanks to all of you who have taken the time to respond. I am wandering through the bookstore this weekend to look. Although I had considered Joy, I never though of Better homes, and I grab that fairly often for quick things....
    Thanks again. Although I enjoy the cooking calls from him, I don't relish the midnight calls when he decides to cook...he "reaches out to touch someone", namely mom for help...and I don't often function well when asleep............
    thanks
     
  13. -d-

    -d-

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    you may want to check out The Best Recipe by the editors of Cook's Illustrated Magazine. I've recommended this cookbook to many aspiring home cooks with much success. Especially appreciative are those who are in high-tech. They enjoy the testing of various recipes to determine which are considered the best by the authors.