convertion

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10
Joined Nov 23, 2010
Help

 I am converting a recipe for 8 people to a recipe for 225. The recipe calls for a 15.5oz can and I don't know how to convert it to a #10 can. Does anyone know how to convert it.  Food guy
 
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[table][tr][td]
[h4]Can Size Number[/h4]
[/td][td]
[h4]Approximate
Volume of Food
[/h4]
[/td][td]
[h4]Approximate
Weight of Food
[/h4]
[/td][/tr][tr][td]
No. 1 picnic
[/td][td]
1 1/4 cups
[/td][td]
10 1/2 to 12 ounces
[/td][/tr][tr][td]
No. 300
[/td][td]
1 3/4 cups
[/td][td]
14 to 16 ounces
[/td][/tr][tr][td]
No. 303
[/td][td]
2 cups
[/td][td]
16 to 17 ounces
[/td][/tr][tr][td]
No. 2
[/td][td]
2 1/2 cups
[/td][td]
20 ounces
[/td][/tr][tr][td]
No. 2 1/2
[/td][td]
3 1/2 cups
[/td][td]
27 to 29 ounces
[/td][/tr][tr][td]
No. 3
[/td][td]
5 3/4 cups
[/td][td]
51 ounces
[/td][/tr][tr][td]
No. 10
[/td][td]
3 quarts
[/td][td]
6 1/2 pounds to
7 pounds and 5 ounces

[/td][/tr][/table]
 
6,367
128
Joined Feb 1, 2007
In the U.S., #300 and # 2 1/2 are the commonest sizes, with #10 pretty much confined to bulk foods and commercial usage---although it used to be more common at the retail level, when families were larger.

Given the on-going trend of lowering quantitites to avoid the appearance of a price hike, you can pretty much count on quantities being at, or a bit below, the ranges on Pete's chart. For instance, 12.5 ounces is getting fairly common as the net weight in #300 cans.
 
2
10
Joined Nov 23, 2010
Thanks to all for the information. I found out that not all #10 cans have the same weight.

Food guy
 
6,367
128
Joined Feb 1, 2007
The wouldn't have, even before packers started playing games. Keep in mind the weight/volume figures are based on water. Anything more or less dense will have a different net weight.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
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Joined Oct 7, 2001
As a rough estimate, a #10 holds approximately 3 quarts, the weight of which will vary greatly depending on the item inside (chow mein noodles weigh a lot less than a #10 can of tomato paste).  I would get a volume measure of your 15.5 oz can and do the math from there.  It won't be perfect, but it will get you in the ballpark.
 
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