Confit of Duck

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by gsquared, Oct 1, 2002.

  1. gsquared

    gsquared

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    Here's the thing - I have a small dinner party thing coming Sat - just 6 pax, and have decided to do something with a tin of duck confit that I have had lotering in my pantry for a while. I opened it tonight (it contains 12 pieces), warmed up two in the oven and served it for dinner with fondant potatoes and asparagus. The idea was (it has been some time since I used confit) to establish a "base" taste to decide what I have to work with for the dinner party. The duck was, as expected, tender (as in falling off the bone) but somehat bland - it clearly needs a kick and I am tired to my marrow of sweet or oriental sauces with duck. I do not think that anything creamy or egg-based will work and am leaning towards tomato and basil.......

    Suggestions on how to lift the duck will be welcome.
     
  2. alexia

    alexia

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    Never having heard the term "fondant potatoes" I googled it and came up with several recipes, mostly rather different from each other. What would the term properly refer to? Most of them involved baking with stock, some sliced, some pureed, etc.
     
  3. gsquared

    gsquared

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    Cut some potatoes into barrel shapes, and then slice into about 3cm (1 inch) pieces. Melt a goodly quantity of butter in a pan, place the spuds upright in the butter and fill the pan up to halfway up the potatoes with stock (I use a good beef stock). Simmer until the stock is evaporated, turn the potatoes and refill with stock to the same level. Simmer again until the stock is evaporated and server with a sprinkling of parsley.
     
  4. thebighat

    thebighat

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    I'd saute up a little garlic, shallot, some chopped tomatoes, rosemary, orange rind, green olives and a splash of white wine and let it cook till done. Then I'd toss in the duck for a little while.
     
  5. suzanne

    suzanne

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    You're just getting into Spring there, right? How about a warm salad? Use TBH's ingredients in a vinaigrette and serve the whole just gently warm over bitter greens or whatever leaves are coming into season.
     
  6. gsquared

    gsquared

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    I tested a few ideas last night, and I have decided to do a simple sauce with very ripe tomatoes, a lot of basil and some garlic - all whizzed in the food processor, then into a pot, medium flame, season (black pepper) and heat the duck portions in the sauce. The basil does the trick for me and, combined with the tomatoes, goes wonderfully with the confit. I will serve it with a potato galette and, maybe, blanched asparagus. For dessert I plan on pears poached in Cab. served with a gorgonzola ice cream.
    Thans for the ideas.
     
  7. cape chef

    cape chef

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  8. gsquared

    gsquared

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    Tkx, CC - great info! I am not so sure that I will dash off to do my own confit, at least not while I can buy good quality at a reasonable price, but I am tempted......
     
  9. suzanne

    suzanne

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    GSquared -- if you have access to duck and salt, and just about any kind of herb and/or spice, you too can make confit. It is really one of the easiest things to do -- especially if you cook it in the oven. Maybe when you use up your current stash ... :D
     
  10. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    How was the meal?
     
  11. nzchef

    nzchef

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    Confit of duck is a very traditonal french style dish, if done well can be amazing.I guess the difference in most confits is the flavour and of course the fat used in the process.I have confit of duck in my restaurant and it sells like hotcakes, i serve it with cabbage two way and a blueberry jus....the most important things to remember with confit duck is that u should salt the legs both sides and let sit for a min of 24 hours prior to even cooking to remove any excess moisture from them, then secondly to cook fully immersed in the fat with the desired flavours,rosmary,garlic and thyme although simply really do compliment the dish in a low oven at 150c for 2-3hours...the slower the better.