Condensed milk VS home-reduced milk

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by wyandotte, Jul 23, 2018.

  1. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    Hi. I seem unable to find an answer to this:

    is there a difference between using a can of condensed milk that you buy at the store, and reducing milk on your stove top by simmering and stirring for a long time? I have a weird recipe for a melon pudding, which tells us to take 3 cups of milk (they do not specify how much fat) and cook & stir til it's thick.

    Thanks v. much in advance!
     
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    You're thinking of evaporated milk, not condensed. You would want to reduce normal milk by half, or in your case use 1.5c evaporated milk.

    As far as the instructions go to stir until thick... that's truly odd.
     
  3. Iceman

    Iceman

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    Generally speaking ... for the $$ of a can ... I'm not doing the work.
     
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  4. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    Thanks for your answers. Well, I didn't know that condensed & evaporated are NOT the same thing! So I went to the i/net and found this:

    upload_2018-7-22_19-7-1.jpeg
    www.finecooking.com
    Evaporated milk is condensed milk without the added sugar with the water content cooked off until it has a consistency that is similar to cream. ... Evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk cannot be used interchangeably in cooking, because one product contains much more sugar than the other.

    I am grateful for this info, Kuan. I simply did not know. And, iceman, you are certainly right about the work involved in reducing the milk yourself.

    The pudding I took to is loosely based on some asian Indian thing called kheer, apparently. Except in kheer, you cook everything at the same time instead of trying to thicken the milk separately for hours. I have thought of inventing a device that you clamp onto the pot and it stirs slowly for you for as long as you need so that your milk does not burn at the bottom of the pot. Some spring loaded thing that you crank up and it slowly unwinds and stirs your whatever.

    I don't have the brains to actually put something like this together, though. Men are better inventors than women, I guess!
     
  5. kronin323

    kronin323

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    The thing is, there's a lot more good ideas out there than original ones. You come up with an inspiration for something new then find you're right, it was a good idea. So good that someone else already had it and turned it into a product.

    Go to amazon and search "automatic stirrer for cooking" and you'll find a number of options for what you want... This link might work as well:
    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_...or+cooking&sprefix=automatic+stir,electronics
     
  6. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    @kronin. Ha ha ha. I've been wanting something like that for years and thought there's no way anyone has come up with that, so I didn't even bother looking it up on the internet. Oh, well! Thanx for the link!

    However, my particular version might be original inasmuch as it is low-tech, not electrical or battery. A wind-up clock mechanism, basically. Crank crank crank. I have it all pictured in my overheated little brain...:p

    How about a kitchen sink with overflow protection. Why have I never seen this, anywhere, ever? Bathtub, yes. Bathroom sink, yes. Kitchen sink - why the heck not?
     
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  7. kronin323

    kronin323

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    That's a good question. Here's an even better one... Why don't our home bathrooms and kitchens have floor drains? In plenty of foreign countries they have floor drains in the bathrooms. Why not here? Even commercially, restaurant kitchens have floor drains. Public restrooms have floor drains. Why not at home? There's already all that plumbing in those rooms, what's one more drain?

    Have you ever seen how much damage a running toilet can do if it gets clogged up? I have. Like $50K worth...
     
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  8. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    Have you ever seen how much damage a running toilet can do if it gets clogged up? I have. Like $50K worth...

    Ghastly!

    Have you seen my kitchen and 2 adjoining rooms after I left the tap running to answer the phone in another room? :eek:
     
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  9. kronin323

    kronin323

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    Were they on the 2nd floor? ;)

    Sounds like we're both water damage victims. Though it was The Wife who let the water run with mine...
     
  10. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    Nope. We live in a one-storey house. I did not even bother looking in the crawlspace, I was so mortified. I cleaned the mess myself; it took hours. Bawling the whole time.

    I've never heard of a clogged, running toilet doing such damage as you describe. Gah. Did insurance pay?

    Is it just us women that who leave taps running and then leave the room. That's why I want an overflow-proof sink!
     
  11. kronin323

    kronin323

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    That's pretty much the same thing The Wife said (she's the one who clogged it and then left it running)...

    Yes insurance paid but our house was trashed for about six months.
     
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