Comments on sharpening using a fine india stone

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by kokopuffs, Jun 3, 2014.

  1. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Yesterday I got p***ed at my fine india; it just wasn't doing the job with sharpening my knife like it should.  I've always had a bit of difficulty using finer, harder stones on knives.  I became so angry that I applied lots more pressure onto my Sabatier chefs knife 1095 carbon, much more pressure and the edge I got really looked professional and the bevel quite even all the way along the blade.   And it cut thru veggies as though it operated on its own power.

    Hmmm, something to be said for using firm/firm-heavy pressure with this stone.  I wonder if the same pressure should be used when sharpening with a soft arkansas and surgical stones.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  2. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    Is it clogged or glazed Koko?

    I had to lap mine a few months back with S/C grit and a glass plate when it had gotten a bit glazed.

    More pressure = more abrasion regardless of media but the question is right pressure for the blade.

    Jim
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Nearly brand new and not glazed.  With more pressure, I really "felt" its grit come alive when more pressure was applied to the blade against the stone.

    When it comes to lapping, what is "S/C grit"?
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  4. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    S/C = Silicon Carbide. I use loose grit to lap oilstones with which is far faster than wet dry paper.

    I got a 8"x3"x1/2" India set for Sharpeningsupplies.com and they took a few blades to break in and lose some initial aggressiveness.

    Jim
     
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    You're using loose SC as in valve grinding compound?
    Your India set, is it a combo stone????  A tri-hone???   Which one(s)????

    Initial aggressiveness????   Hmmm, I've up to now been too gentle with that fine India.  No more.  Will use way more pressure to sharpen with that stone.  I've read somewhere that with that stone, there is a bit of glaze remaining from the manufacturing process that requires a couple of good "sharpening sessions" to remove, to make that stone come alive as it were.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  6. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  7. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I've both the Norton Tri Hone IM313 at 11 1/2 inches and the combo India at 11 1/2 inches that came in a zinc storage box.  Next time do yourself a favor and get the bench stone(s) measuring at least 11 1/2 inches.

    I found the SC lapping stone at LV.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2014
  8. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    I would if I had bench space for those beasties. ;) I have too many stones and not enough space.

    Jim
     
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Trust me, you are short changing yourself using anything shorter than 11 inches.

    Which grit from LV do you use to remove glaze/clogging/swarf from your oilstones??
     
  10. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    It was a huge leap in real estate going from 6X2 to 8X3 so I can imagine a 11.5X2.5.

    The 90X and 180X. Their instructions said to not use the finer stuff for lapping sharpening stones. I got the 5 pack and have other uses for the finer grits.

    Jim
     
  11. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    A long, unobstucted stroke does really well for both a chefs knife and a boning knife.  ...a long and continuous stroke.