Coleslaw

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by pocahantas, Jun 26, 2012.

  1. pocahantas

    pocahantas

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    Has anyone heard of soaking your cabbage in vinegar to make coleslaw?   I had coleslaw at one of our favorite

    places and the waitress said they soak the cabbage in vinegar.   It was amazing!   Any one know how long  to

    soak it and if it should be rinsed after the soaking.   It gave it a great flavor and super creamy texture.   I would

    be so grateful for whatever info you can give me here.   Thank you so much.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Haven't heard of that method before.

    I'm not sure how much I'd trust that waitress's description though. I don't think she really understood what the kitchen is doing with the coleslaw. It might be part of it, or a pickling thing they do, but just a vinegar soak and a creamy result doesn't sound complete. 
     
  3. pocahantas

    pocahantas

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    I agree.   She sort of whispered that their secret was that they soaked it in vinegar.   

    Perhaps she was just trying to give us what she thought we wanted to hear too.  I

    just know that it was the most amazing coleslaw that I have ever eaten and at my

    age I have eaten a lot of slaw.   Thanks for the input.
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Thats why she is a waitress. This will make the slaw so soggy so quick that I doubt if you would eat it. .Great to put a littel in saurkraut with the salt and a drop in red cabbage but thats it.
     
  5. pocahantas

    pocahantas

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    Thanks so much for the input.  
     
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    If it were soaked in dilute vinegar for a couple of hours then drained, it would have been something like dressing it twice.  There are a lot of vinegar based cole-slaw dressings after all.  

    Just as a thought experiment, consider what it would taste like if you dressed your slaw in a vinegar dressing, refrigerated it for a few hours, drained, then dressed again in a creamy, mayo and/or sour cream based dressing.  I've never tried it but think it would work well.

    Ed's experience is different from mine.  Vinegar doesn't make for soggy cabbage (or sauerkraut either).  But... remember that you want to soak a cabbage based slaw in its dressing (and drain off the water which gets thrown off) for a while before serving to improve texture AND flavor.

    BDL
     
  7. someday

    someday

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    Hang on now.

    Pickling the cabbage first could be a valid technique. If done properly, a vinegar soaked cabbage could actually be better at retaining texture than a simple dressed cabbage. The vinegar could go towards making it crispy...just like any other pickled veg, no?

    I've made plenty of vinegar based slaws, though I have to admit that I've never soaked a batch in vinegar. I could see some sort of pickled cabbage as a base for a cole slaw as being potentially very good. The catch is the texture of course. 

    We need more details about the cole slaw. Was it vinegar based or creamy? Was it crisp or soggy and limp? 
     
  8. pocahantas

    pocahantas

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    Thank you BDL.   I do think I will play with the recipe and see what happens.   Once upon a time I was a waitress but it didn't mean I was totally

    stupid to what was going on behind the scene.    I find it difficult to believe she would just make something up knowing that we are good, frequent,

    high tipping customers.    Sometimes the best way to make something is by experimenting.    Grateful for everyone's input.   Thank you so much.
     
  9. chefedb

    chefedb

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    After adding whatever dressing let sit a while then place on inverted dish in a bowl the liquid will drain down and off cabbage mix

      Or you can do what is done with commercially made . That is to add a gel or agar or stabilizer to the mix to hold the dressing to the cabbage mix. Don't use red cabbage if holding overnight as the color will leech out and make whole mix pink and unappealing.

    Many Japanese places make a cabbage based rice wine combo type salad (more like Health Slaw) it is very good but in most cases they make just enough for the days service.(IE Bennihanna)
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2012