Clotted Cream!!

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Joined Dec 27, 2017
Hello everyone!! New here, I’m sure with everyone’s vast experience here you have made or tried this amazing treat! I however have not... until now. I was thumbing around youtube as I always do looking for interesting things I’ve never cooked or tried, came across the title of Clotted Cream and had to look, and then I made it, omg soooo good. I’m from the good ol USA, and never heard of this jewel. We here in the states cannot get (from stores) raw milk or cream at least nothing that isn’t ultra pasteurized. So I made it with what I could get, and if it’s this good from ultra pasteurized Cream I can’t imagine what it will be like when I can get raw!! ( I know, it’s not safe, but I used to live on a farm and you ain’t had milk till you drink it freshly harvested) anyways, I can’t wait to make some biscuits or scones and go to town on this. I guess I just want to see what you guys think of this amazing treat!! God bless the person in the U.K for creating this stuff!!! Let me know some ways to use it besides slathering an obnoxious amount on bread lol!!
 
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How about slathering an obnoxious amount, together with some jam, on scones. :) Other than that I haven't a clue what else could be done with it.

I've never made real clotted cream (I can buy some locally for a hideous price) but have made a "faux clotted cream" -- basically half-churned cream that substitutes... so long as nobody knows what the real stuff is really like.
 
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Joined Dec 27, 2017
All you do is take two pints of double cream ( not ultra pasteurized ) pour it in a baking dish 8x8 put in an oven for 12 hours at 200F then let cool to room temp, put covered in fridge over night, pour of liquid and then put solid clotted cream in a jar and ENJOY!!!
 
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Sounds very similar to creme fraiche from France. Creme fraiche uses buttermilk I think but otherwise very similar.
You can get raw milk if you buy directly from the farm. At least in New York. Not sure if that's national, but raw milk can't be sold in stores. Find a dairy farm and talk to the farmer.
 
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this is a whole different animal to creme fraiche. It tastes like butter almost but not really, idk I think it needs its own food group!! Lol
 
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Oh and yes, creme fraiche uses active culture, if you want to make some, take about 16 oz of double cream or whipping cream ( same thing ) and put about 3 tbl spoons of buttermilk in it then put something breathable on top. I use a coffee filter held by a rubber band. Let stand at room temp for 24 hours then stir and cover with a lid and put in the fridge. Oh yes and make sure your jar is sterilized before you start!! Best creme fraiche ever!
 
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Interesting...
Claire Lower on Serious Eats talks about how ultra pasteurized cream, contrary to popular thought, can make perfect fermented dairy. Even better than non ultra pasteurized. Specifically, she's talking about a crème fraîche she made:

"Can I Use Ultra-Pasteurized Cream?
A word on the cream: I had always heard that ultra-pasteurized cream should be avoided at all costs when attempting to make any type fermented dairy. In On Food and Cooking, Harold McGee states that ultra-pasteurization decreases the lactose content, effectively putting the bacteria on a diet and robbing them of their favorite meal.

Being the experimental chemist that I am, I decided to do a side-by-side comparison, and was surprised to find that the ultra-pasteurized batch actually came out perfectly. Not only did it thicken much faster than the pasteurized cream, but the resulting crème fraîche was much more homogenous, without any of the curd-like chunks that plagued the pasteurized batch."

Well, as we all know, this doesn't always happen. And while the food science editors at Serious Eats have some theories, they can't explain it. But it is possible! :cool:
 
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