cilantro/coriander is it the same??

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by ojosverdes, May 14, 2005.

  1. ojosverdes

    ojosverdes

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    I posted this somewhere else too but just realized it would be better here...
    I am hoping someone can set the record strait once and for all. I want to know if cilantro and coriander are really one in the same. At the moment I live in Germany and while the coriander here looks like cilantro, it has a very different scent and flavor. The websites I have looked up so far say they are same so I have either completely lost my taste buds or maybe there really is a slight difference. Does anyone have an answer for me? Thank you to anyone who might be able to help.
     
  2. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Cilantro is the "herb" (leaves) as Coriander is the "seed" of the plant.

    Cilantro is an herb, coriander is a spice. They are both from the same species.
     
  3. keeperofthegood

    keeperofthegood

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  4. chrose

    chrose

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    Coriander happens when you allow Cilantro to go to seed. I had beautiful Cilantro growing last year and I allowed it to go to seed. Eventually the leaves shrunk away and I was left with a ton of Coriander seeds. This year I plan to control my Cilantro. I would rather have Cilantro all summer than Coriander all year!
     
  5. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Keep in mind that the growing condition's and age of harvest will all change the flavor. Here in Los Angeles I have gone to the same market, and at different times and have gotten cilantro's that have tasted a little different at times. Typically they varied in strength of flavor and aroma.

    Also they might be growing different strains of corriender/cilantro herb.
     
  6. ojosverdes

    ojosverdes

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    Thanks to everyone who replied. It is so nice to hear from people who know what they are talking about. Have a great day!!
     
  7. markv

    markv

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    Cilantro’s nomenclature is somewhat confusing. The entire plant and the seeds are properly named coriander, while the leaves alone are cilantro. Colloquially, the entire plant and leaves are referred to as cilantro and only the seeds as coriander.

    Chrose:

    I grow cilantro every year. In fact, I just bought an entire flat of it yesterday. I don't mind ending up with the seeds but I would like the leaves to last longer. How can you control it that you will get leaves all year?

    Mark
     
  8. phoebe

    phoebe

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    The only way I know of--and I've yet to be really successful at this--is to sow seeds every week or two, so once one batch is used up or bolting, the next one is ready.
     
  9. chrose

    chrose

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    Mark I'm actually a neophyte at growing Cilantro so I defer to Phoebe....however what I'm going to try this time is to not let them seed and to keep pulling leaves. Also I will be using the Alaska Bountea system so we'll see what if anything that does to it as well.
     
  10. andy m.

    andy m.

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    To further confuse the issue, I have noticed in recipes that originate in Europe, cilantro is often referred to as coriander leaves or simply as coriander.
     
  11. markv

    markv

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    Alaska Bountea system??????????????
     
  12. chrose

    chrose

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  13. shahar

    shahar

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    for extra confusion cilantro is sometimes called chinese parsly. especially in older books. Like circa 1950.
     
  14. suzanne

    suzanne

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    So the upshot of all this is: You have to figure out from the context of the recipe whether it's calling for
    whole or ground coriander seeds -- usually measured in teaspoons or tablespoons and added before cooking as a spice;
    or
    cilantro / coriander leaves / Chinese parsley -- measured in [fractions of] cups or tablespoons, often described as "chopped" or "minced" and used raw, and often added at or near the end as a garnish.

    Either one might be added to a marinade, but you can take your cue from the amount and form.

    Hope this helps clear up some of the confusion.

    But now, to make it even more complicated: don't confuse cilantro with CULANTRO, which is a different herb entirely. :rolleyes: Culantro is used in Latin American cooking, and I doubt it's common in Germany. I mean, it isn't even all that easy to get in my local stores catering to Central Americans and Caribbean Hispanics.
     
  15. mudbug

    mudbug

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    This is incorrect. In the case of your description, the seed and foilage come from the same cultivar

    Your links are for entirely different species of plants.

    Most cookbooks or recipes geared toward Americans will be refer to the definition of "Cilantro" as the foilage of the plant (Coriandrum sativum) and "Corriander" as the seed the Coriandrum sativum plant creates.

    Cilantro
    [​IMG]

    Corriander
    [​IMG]

    There are many similar plants. Suzanne mentioned Culantro (Mexican Cilantro) is pronounced (Koo lan tro). There is also Vietnamese Cilantro, an entirely different herb but similar in taste.

    Here are terms for "American" Cilantro in other countries:

    Albanian
    Koriandër e kultivuar

    Amharic
    Dimbilal

    Arabic
    Kuzbara, Kazbarah

    Armenian
    Kinj

    Bengali
    Dhoney

    Bulgarian
    Koriandur

    Burmese
    Nan nan zee (fruits), Nan nan bin (herb), Naunau

    Catalan
    Celiàndria, Coriandre

    Chinese
    Yan Shi, Fan Yan Sui, Yuen sai, Wan-Swee, heong choy(herb), Hu sui (fruits)

    Croatian
    Korijandar

    Czech
    Koriandr

    Danish
    Coriander

    Dutch
    Ketoembar, Koriander

    English
    Coriander, Chinese parsley, Indian parsley (herb)

    Esperanto
    Koriandro

    Estonian
    Aedkoriander, Koriander

    Farsi
    Geshniz

    Finnish
    Korianteri

    French
    Coriandre, Punaise mâle, Persil arabe

    Gaelic
    Coireiman, Lus a choire

    Georgian
    Khinji

    German
    Koriander, Wanzenkümmel, Chinesische Petersilie, Indische Petersilie (herb)

    Greek
    ?????????, ?????????, ?????????

    *
    Koliandro, Koriantro, Koriandro

    Gujrati
    Dhane, Dhana (fruits), Kothmir (herb)

    Hebrew
    Gad, Kusbara

    Hindi
    Dhania , dhanya(fruits), Hara dhania (herb)

    Hungarian
    Koriander, Cigánypetrezselyem, Beléndf?, Zergef?

    Icelandic
    Kóríander

    Indonesian
    Ketumbar (fruits), Daun ketumbar (herb)

    Italian
    Coriandolo

    Japanese
    Koyendoro, Koendoro (herb)

    Latvian
    Kinzas, Koriandrs

    Laotian
    hong pomn

    Lithuanian
    Kalendra

    Kannada
    Havija, Kambari

    Khmer
    Vannsui, Chi van-suy

    Laotian
    Phak hom pom, phak hom pam (herb)

    Malay
    Ketumbar (fruits), Daun ketumbar, Wansui (herb), Penjilang

    Malayalam
    Kottamalli

    Marathi
    Dhanya, Dhane (fruits), Kothimbir (herb)

    Norwegian
    Koriander

    Pahlawi
    Gishniiz

    Pashto
    Gashneez

    Polish
    Kolendra siewna

    Portuguese
    Coentro

    Romanian
    Coriandru

    Russian
    Kinza, Kishnets (herb); Koriandr (fruits)

    Sanskrit
    Dhaniyaka, Kustumburi

    Singhalese
    Kotthamallie

    Slovak
    Koriander

    Slovenian
    Koriander

    Spanish
    Coriandro, Cilantro, Cilandrio, Culantro

    Swahili
    Giligilani

    Swedish
    Koriander

    Tagalog
    Kulantro, Unsuey, Wansuey, Uan-soi (herb)

    Tamil
    Kothamalli

    Telugu
    Dhaniyalu, Kotimiri

    Thai
    Pak chi met, Phak hom, Phak Cheethai (herb), Mellet pak chi (fruits)

    Tibetan
    Sona pentsom, So na pad tshom

    Turkish
    Ki?ni?, Ki?nic

    Ukrainian
    Koriandr posyvnyj

    Urdu
    Dhania

    Vietnamese
    Mui, Ngo, Ngo ta, Ngò Rí(herb)
     
  16. keeperofthegood

    keeperofthegood

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    I would dissagree. The web site that I refference in my responce is one of the more complete web references on plants online for the general person that generally likes to cook and generally wants a bit more information that the general public. However, he rarely mentions or persues the issue of variatals or cultivars with his information. He states only the base latin names and ends there, instead dealing with what makes an herb the herb it is, and how it is used, and also its general history. This herb has a long history, and any plant with a long history has diverse varietys available.

    I have planted the corriander seads (bought as seads), and grown plants that were spindly and leafless but produced big clusters of nice seeds. Obviously not a seed from which the leaves would be used.

    So, yes, I think that there are plants that will produce more sead than leaf, and plants that will produce more leaf than seed.

    As to there being two links, both links come up as corriander on a search on that sight. I realise that only the first link is the specific plant in general that is being discussed.


    Oh, and on a little bit of google searching, I was able to find five cultivars of this herb, developed for leaf, grow season, and weather conditions.

    http://www.bobvila.com/ProductServic...riander-1.html
    Of which two are still available, and
    http://www.agr.gov.sk.ca/docs/crops/...orianderff.asp
    with the text:
    I am sure there is a lot more than these too. Just a quick bit of googleing.
     
  17. mudbug

    mudbug

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    I should have clarified but I was in a hurry... My response was specifically based on the links you provided in your original post. I am very familiar with Gernot Katzer's site, and have been for several years and have correspond with him. My post was not in response to the source of the information but rather your explanation of it, which could be confusing and misleading especially with the inclusion of the second link as Suzanne clarifies in her post. Although I realize it was not intentional - it was oversimplified. I am not disagreeing with you that the difference in cultivars is responsible for the "very different scent and flavor" ojosverdes is experiencing.

    While it is easy to google or use other search services for information, this particular topic does not have a simple answer due to the number of variables which need to be taken into consideration.

    Your post can easily lead one to believe that some cultivars are only good for one and not the other of seed or foilage production. But the reality is that there are cultivars which have both sufficient foliage for harvest as well as sufficient seed production for use as a spice. Bigger seeds are not necessarily better for use as a spice in culinary endeavors. Both large and small seeds are used as the spice corriander. What is available or common in some regions, may not be available or preferred in others.

    To those not familiar with plant taxonomy, which the average person usually is not, your post suggests you are referring to each of the the two species for which you provided links as "cultivars". When in reality, neither of the links themselves are specifically for cultivars, but rather the "species" - both of which are in the same Apiacceae (parsley) family.

    Coriandrum sativum L
    (commonly known as cilantro)

    Eryngium foetidum L.
    (commonly known as Culantro which is often a substitute for cilantro, and has a well known common name of Mexican Coriander)

    Had you listed only the first link of your first post along with specific cultivar/variety names which can be found at links in your latest post, then this would have been a much more accurate depiction of different cultivars. There are often numerous cultivars of specific species.

    The reality is, that the answer to the title and post of the original question for which this thread was created is: Yes, the terms cilantro and coriander can both refer to the same species of plants. This is due to colloquial differences. Each of the terms are common names and both (as MarkV said) can refer to seed depending on where you are in the world, while cilantro is typically referrs only to foilage.

    To further complicate the explanation, there are different "cultivars" (commonly referred to as "variety" or "selection") of species which serves as an explanation for the "...very different scent and flavor" of what you've had access to based on region and what was made available at that time. And finally, as shahar mentions, in addition to cultivar/varitey names, common names such as "chinese parsely" are also used.

    As for planting and your personal experience, numerous factors besides the genetics of the seed can influence foilage growth and seed production. In this case, Coriandrum sativum is extremely short lived unless it is a slow bolting variety. It is also very particular about the environment in which it is grown - being highly sensitive (more than the average plant) to soil, nutrients, temperature, light, moisture, and drainage. As moderator of The Chef's Garden Forum, if you would like to discuss your gardening experiences please feel free to stop in and contribute to existing threads or start your own. ;)

    And yes, there are hundreds of cultivars of Coriandrum sativum L in existence.

    MarkV, Chrose is correct. It is unlikely you will get your cilantro plants to produce longer than an average of two weeks, more with a slow bolting variety. The best method to use is succession planting. If you plant seeds every two weeks for a total of six weeks, and allow some plants to go to seed and self sow, you should have some amount of cilantro thru the rest of the season depending on your location and where you plant them. Specify your zone and I will be able to provide more specific advice.

    Also, please don't forget to search The Chef's Garden Forum for existing threads with more advice:

    http://www.cheftalkcafe.com/forums/s...ead.php?t=6275
    http://www.cheftalkcafe.com/forums/s...ead.php?t=7425
     
  18. chrose

    chrose

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    Ya know..............I never get tired of hearing that phrase :D
     
  19. mudbug

    mudbug

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    lol :roll:
     
  20. keeperofthegood

    keeperofthegood

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    ;) I got ya. Yes, my first post was a two thoughter. The links were only for a "huh, what?" type of answer.

    My text though is correct, just not fully correct. Varietals exist for many many reasons for all plants activly grown by humans, some for climate, or season etc., and others for flavour, or size etc. and some just because of locked geography. I simply didn't want to google at that point, only to say, ya, the same, but not nessesarily. What you buy as the sead as a spice may not nessesarily be the exact same plant you buy as an herb.

    :D