Chuka Soba chow mein stir-fry noodles and Ponzu sauce

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by happy cooker, Apr 16, 2011.

  1. happy cooker

    happy cooker

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    I made Japanese food today and  bought ponzu sauce that I thought would go well with the chuka soba noodles.  I hesitated when I bought the ponzu sauce as I think it cost around $7.50.

    Googled it a moment ago and it is a "tangy soy-based sauce."  Soy sauce doesn't cost any where near that.  I buy low sodium soy sauce and 1 tablespoon had 400+ mg. of sodium compared to 340 mg. for the ponzu sauce.

    The noodles were more like spaghetti than what I had expected.  Does anyone have any ideas for recipes using the sauce and noodles?  I'd like to jazz it up a bit.  It was delicious with

    the other foods I prepared but these two just didn't meet my expectations.

    Thanks in advance for your input.
     
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    How big a bottle was that, HappyCooker?

    Ponzu is just citrus-flavored soy sauce, and, unless you bought a really large bottle, shouldn't have cost anything like that.

    Regular Soba are buckwheat noodles, sometimes including some wheat as well. Chuka Soba are a variation of that made with wheat alone, and are like a soft ramen.

    To me, combining just the two doesn't make a lot of culinary sense. But you could use the ponzu as part of additional flavorings, the same way you'd use lemon juice in western dishes to perk everything up.

    You might try cooking the chuka soba in stock, instead of water, then add cooked peas, sliced scallions, and a bit of a protein such as shrimp. Then sprinkle with just a wee bit of the ponzu.
     
  3. benway

    benway

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    To really get a taste for soba you'll want to try it cold.  Try making a vinaigrette with the ponzu, dunk the noodles and don't forget to slurp.  The air that you suck in with the noodles is important.
     
  4. happy cooker

    happy cooker

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    Just checked the ponzu sauce and the bottle is 6.75 fl. oz (200 ml) and I paid $7.79 for it - just checked my ticket.  We eat a lot of Japanese food and have traveled to Japan - never heard of it - so I bought it thinking it would be 'the ticket'.  

    Thanks for explaining to me what it is and how to use it - could just use the soy sauce!
     
  5. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    The bottle on my shelf is 10 ounces (296 ml), HappyCooker, and I know I didn't pay anything near that much for it. I'll check the actual price soon as I get a chance, but if memory serves (and it often doesn't) it was closer to five bucks than to eight. But, then again, your in southern California, and everything is pricier there.

    Certainly you can use regular soy sauce. The flavor won't be the same, but that doesn't mean it won't be good. Different just means different.

    Frankly, I decided that once this bottle is used up I wouldn't be replacing it, because I can achieve the same result by using soy sauce and adding some orange-lemon-lime juice as appropriate, and not have to keep yet another condiment around.