Chopping Large Amounts of Parsley (Pacojet?)

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by daverdown, Jun 3, 2014.

  1. daverdown

    daverdown

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    Hi y'all.

    This is my first post here. My name is Dave and I live in Texas.

      I'm looking for a machine for chopping parsley for tabouli, which is by far the most time consuming task my staff has to endure on a daily basis. A typical food processor is useless for this because I need the stems to be cut perpendicular  to their length, and the spinning blade merely beats the stems around but does not chop them nicely.  We do it by hand.

      I've found gigantic, industrial, conveyer belt choppers on line, but I'm looking for something in a smaller, counter top version.  We usually do about 40 bunches at a time, but the company is growing fast, as is production.

      I've been told by a friend that a Pacojet would work great for this, but have been unable to find any testimony on line, and although Pacojet has many video demonstrations available, none of them have anything to do with chopping fresh herbs.  It would be awesome to get a Pacojet.  I'm sure I could come up with many convenient, time saving uses for it, even though I don't intend to make any ice-cream.  Their rep/sales person with whom I'v been corresponding assures me that it will be great for parsley, but it costs $5,000!  Our CFO has basically given me the go ahead to buy one, but if it doesn't actually take a significant chunk out of production time, I'm gonna feel like a dummy.

    I'd appreciate any insight on bulk parsley prep, and/or Pacojets as they relate to prepping herbs and nut butters.

    Thanks...
     
  2. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    What about a buffalo chopper?
     
  3. noga

    noga

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    Chopping parsley can only be done using a good sharp knife .I have been searching for a machine that gives same results  ,with no success.I have met many middle eastern chefs who runs restaurants throughout the levant (where tabouleh is on every table)and to them it's a dream that needs to come into reality.Sorry if my answer won't help .
     
  4. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Ask that rep for a loaner and check it out for yourself.

    The worst that can happen is he says no (or you do get to test drive and prove him untrustworthy).

    mimi
     
  5. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    Y'all remember the slap chop? Would that work?
     
  6. daverdown

    daverdown

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    Thanks for the advice you guys.

    The slap chop is the best suggestion, but its not a professional tool, and I'd probably have to buy a new one every couple months.  Ive looked for it before, but it's no longer a regular item in the "as seen on t.v." section at walmart.

    I doubt the buffalo chopper would work because it essentially has the same blade as the food processor, but the food only passes through the blade once.

    The loaner doesn't seem to be an option.

    Conventional wisdom seems to agree with Noga.  The way of the knife.

    Still though, if anyone has a pacojet, if you get a wild hare, throw some parsley in there with the stems, and let me know what happens.
     
  7. chefedb

    chefedb

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    A buffalo will work but then parsley has to be dipped in water and squeezed out in cheescloth or muslim. Salesman is full of ----- he is just rying to sell it. Ask hime to bring one in  or take you to a place that uses it for a demo? Or do old fashioned way  2 French knives at a time. Its still the best way
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2014
    dobzre likes this.
  8. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, two knives.  Or find a cook who can rock the knife with cutting action both ways.  
     
  9. chef torrie

    chef torrie

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    Seems the best option. Large cutting board. Two french knives or sharp Chinese chefs knives and go to town.
     
  10. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    At work when I make hummus, I have to chop 4 bunches of parsley which I do with my knife. I haven't actually timed it but I can't imagine it takes me any more than 2 minutes, probably more like 1 minute but let's say 2. I will grant you that is not 40 bunches, but even at 2 minutes for 4 that still is only 20 minutes for 40 bunches. Is enough time going to be saved out of a 10-20 minute production time, to justify a $5,000 machine? Or am I way off in my time estimate for the task?
     
  11. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    Literally just watched a vid on the utubes about the pacojet coupe accessories.

    Shows it being used for parsley.
     
    chef mud likes this.
  12. ljokjel

    ljokjel

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    $5k How many containers does that include? Worked at a place where the chef bought 40. Where I'm now we just have seven. The chef ended up paying more for the containers than the machine.
    My guess is that the sales rep will try to sell you a ridiculous amount of containers.

    PacoJet is in my eyes a very good machine. If it's worth the money depends on your operation. In some places i couldn't have been without.
     
  13. ljokjel

    ljokjel

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    "Just add simple syrup, and Pacotize."
     
  14. pirate-chef

    pirate-chef

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    or slight amount of water and paco then you can keep the parsley in piping bags in the freezer to free up buckets thaw in water bath and use. love my paco! 
     
  15. pirate-chef

    pirate-chef

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    on another thought.... for the money how about running them through a juicer the way the blade spins it should break down everything to somewhere around the size you want. if you are doing it in a paco you will more or less have a pure since you are freezing it and the blade is shaving a frozen mass at 3000 rpm. with a juicer you should have a similar result and could control the liquid level a little better? just another thought that popped into my mind. 
     
  16. daverdown

    daverdown

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    Hey, you guys.

    Sorry I haven't checked in in a while.  I talked to a chef friend of mine who convinced me that the machine will do the trick.  I've been having my staff log how long it takes them to do the parsley by hand.  Our CFO wants to figure out exactly how long it will take for the thing to pay for itself before we talk to the owner of the company and make the purchase.  My employees can take anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour to chop 40 bunches.  I don't expect to need a ridiculous number of containers.  Different packages come with different combinations of blades and containers.  

    In order for the dish to right, the parsley has to be as dry as possible, and juicing it would remove a lot of the flavor and nutrients.

    Thanks so much for all the advice.

    RedBeerd, I will look for that video.  
     
  17. foodslut

    foodslut

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    Using a Paco jet would just destroy parsley unless you intend to make a sorbet or ice cream out of it, Paco main purpose is to cut ice crystals so fine that sorbet and icecream is super smooth, even super freezing and making snow is cool, chopping parsley by knife is the best way man, or even getting one of those three bladed chopping knives would cut time, (I use for mince shallots)... in addition, your CFO should worry about other items other then parsley
     
  18. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    No pacojet experience, but learned something yesterday.

    I work in a Mediterranean grill. Lots of tabouleh and lots of parsley in our lamb and beef kebabs.

    We got a new cook, who's a lazy-arse. I trained him personally.

    We process our parsley by cutting the stems off of the bunch and separating the stems and the leaves into different containers. We rough chop the leaves for tabouleh, as needed, and fine-chop the stems for the kebabs, as needed.

    I'm off on Friday the chef had already left for the evening. One of the items on his prep list this past Friday was to process two lbs of parsley.

    This guy throws the parsley into the damn FOOD PROCESSOR!!

    I open on Saturday and pull out the parsley so I can start making kebabs and I find a wet, stringy, clumpy mass of green that smells like fermenting fresh grass clippings from the yard, the day after the rain! It didn't even smell like parsley. It literally smelled like cut grass from the lawn.

    I can't imagine that the Paco would be better.

    DaverDown:  



    ^^Please forgive me for this link format. I'm not familiar with the link policy here. Also, the vid, upon seeing it again, shows the finished parsley, not the actual processing. Kinda suspect at second glance.

    I really think that the hand-held blade is the only way...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 21, 2014
  19. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I really have never found any machine that works as well as 2 good knives in your hands

     Buffalo and other machines break down the cells of the parsley and therefore all the juice and liquid runs out and turns the whole thing into one big mess.  There has never been a machine made that can replace Gods,  giving us hands> They can do multiple things where a machine in most cases can do 1 or maybe 2and they can last for 70 to 90 years
     
  20. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    90 years Ed?  You have proof of that I see?  ;)