choosing a new knife

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Joined Nov 2, 2017
Hey guys, so I recently finished my qualification after much delay and extension, now I am looking at getting a quality knife. I haven't purchased one over the years because it has really upset me to see the amount of young apprentices and cooks with 200-500 dollar knives that they cannot maintain. I have studied under some pure Italian geniuses, and learned the art form of sharpening and maintaining knives on your basic chefs knives and some rather soft steeled peices. I enjoy the light weight and flexibility of the knives as well as their diversity in jobs, so keeping all this in mind, professional to professional, what can you guys suggest in the way of a new blade.
 
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Joined Jan 25, 2013
welcome to the forum. where do you live? many countries have tightened the import of all knives. I would look in your area and see if there any small knife makers who can make you a nice custom. find stores that have a good selection and see what feels best.
 
2,861
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
If you're in Italy you'll not likely find anything special in a Brick'n Morter. There is one Italian company in particular that is a huge ripoff, like selling German steel crap for $1000 a pop, forget the name but we have a post on them somewhere.

We're going to need more input than what you've provided, because you have just left things wide open for any of dozens of knives, including price.
 
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Joined Nov 2, 2017
Hey guys, I'm in Australia, price range would be anywhere from 100-350, as i would like to get a knife to last me a few years and be the workhorse of my set, I have tried many different, brands and styles and find most of the knives all my colleagues rave about, like shun and wusthof, feel far to dense and ridged. (would take the wusthof over the shun any day, if that helps explain what i mean.)
 
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Joined Feb 12, 2016
You mentioned lightweight/flexible and workhorse in the same breath. I think those are antonyms, when it comes to knives.

German steel (e.g. Wusthof, 12 degree edge), generally, will be more durable. Not quite as sharp, but a "workhorse"

Japanese steel (e.g. Shun, 16 degree edge), generally, will be sharper and a better performer, but will require more upkeep. Absolutely used as a "workhorse" by many pros, but again, you'll take it to the stone more often.

My advice is to figure out what sort of performance, durability you want, and what type of upkeep you're willing to accept. That should get you going in the right direction.
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
German stainless fatigues rather quick and requires significant metal removal and frequent sharpening. The Ikon line has decent though unspectacular grinds, but is perhaps even more overpriced than shun.

Japanese knives are in general of better steel, flatter profile, lighter and thinner where it counts, at the edge. You use a different technique with them that is more efficient as their light weight and thin edge frees you from the typical Germand rock-chop.

Check out the knives here http://www.knivesandstones.com/

And here https://japanesechefsknife.com/
 
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Joined Nov 2, 2017
A final explanation for what I mean, the best knife I have had so far was an evens and Taylor blade priced at around $40 aus, this is not the most expensive or reputable knife I have had but It has been the best knife i have used for every job I could find. The flexibility in it was between a third to half that of a quality filliting knife, the steel was soft enough to maintain a razor edge off a steel but was dense enough to carve pumpkin. The design of the blade was akin to a santoku, 8 inches of diverse razor cutting power. This blade lasted me 2 years with a little care taken to maintain it, I guess what I am asking is are there any quality knives that will give me these same advantages, the ability to do literally every Jo but will last me longer or should I stick to my cheap little razors.
 
5
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Joined Nov 2, 2017
A final explanation for what I mean, the best knife I have had so far was an evens and Taylor blade priced at around $40 aus, this is not the most expensive or reputable knife I have had but It has been the best knife i have used for every job I could find. The flexibility in it was between a third to half that of a quality filliting knife, the steel was soft enough to maintain a razor edge off a steel but was dense enough to carve pumpkin. The design of the blade was akin to a santoku, 8 inches of diverse razor cutting power. This blade lasted me 2 years with a little care taken to maintain it, I guess what I am asking is are there any quality knives that will give me these same advantages, the ability to do literally every Jo but will last me longer or should I stick to my cheap little razors.
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
I've never seen a knife cum razor off a steel, or anything even remotely close to it, so my definition of razor most likely differs. Can't fathom why you need a flexing blade. No idea what a Taylor is,oh wait, a Sheffield company by the name, the pro series would, at best, be similar to Victorinox/Firbrox, a bench mark for NSF knives, I saw the 12" chefs selling for just $35 recently. Always felt an 8" DMT XX-fine diamond hone mounted to a paddle would be the slickest way to put a decent edge on quick.

I believe you may need to do a lot more studying and thinking about what you want, I personally just can't recommend anything more specific with what you've given.
 
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Joined Nov 2, 2017
If you cant fathom as you put it why I would need a flexing blade, you have obviously never done any precision work or filleting, you should probably stick to home cooking because as it stands you have given me about the same information me and my chefs laugh about from our wait staff. I am looking for quality professional advice, I have used hundreds of knives at this point and have a very specific style in mind but as I keep getting advice from you home cooks who believe what I am talking about is some kind of mithical bastardization I shall stop coming hear because as I see you have about as much to offer me as the basic apprentices of my city.
 
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Joined Oct 9, 2008
I suspect that part of the difficulty here is that, in Japan, it is much more common to fillet with a heavy, inflexible knife. The technique is obviously different. As a result, there are not all that many flexible fillet knives from Japanese brands. In addition, I believe (though I could have this wrong) that the harder tempering usual in Japanese knives makes it difficult or impossible to produce a fully flexible fillet knife. You may do better looking away from Japan for this particular blade style.
 
2,861
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
If you cant fathom as you put it why I would need a flexing blade, you have obviously never done any precision work or filleting, you should probably stick to home cooking because as it stands you have given me about the same information me and my chefs laugh about from our wait staff. I am looking for quality professional advice, I have used hundreds of knives at this point and have a very specific style in mind but as I keep getting advice from you home cooks who believe what I am talking about is some kind of mithical bastardization I shall stop coming hear because as I see you have about as much to offer me as the basic apprentices of my city.

Oh Brother, your extreme rudeness aside, you expect us to be mind readers, never even mentioning a fillet knife, and then you assume Japanese knives for that job are going to be pretty much the same. And I have to say, we have no record here anywhere of a "Professional" referring to a filet knife as their "workhorse." Thanks jay, this will be my laugh of the day, I'm sure.
 
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