chocolate

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Joined Mar 3, 2002
Can someone recommend a good book, article, etc. on the subject of chocolate that will explain the uses of the different percentages of chocolate. I'm also mystified by the references to a partiocular brand (callibaut, I recall) by numbers that seem to designate different sorts of chocolate. These usually occur in the conversations among professionals.

I understand the differences between unsweetened, bittersweet, semi-sweet, etc. But these estoteric pastry chef discussions are leaving me in the cocoa dust!
 
1,839
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Joined May 29, 1999
There are so many, just look at the store shelves until you find one you like!
I have an industry booklet from lint form 14 years ago, the best. It took you from bean to bar!
Also call Hershey or any chocolate maker in your area and ask them if they have any literature.
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
I haven't ever seen that info in a published book (on specific chocolate brands)... it isn't really something to publish. You have to think about it this way: the chocolate manufactors are free to mix their chocolates with any bean, sugar, milk combo they want and to make changes along the way. You can't make rules or a guideline as such to follow an ever changing thing.

So to know the differences we have brocures we recieve from the companies thru sales reps. that describe their chocolate lines. You can look up these companies online or call them and ask to recieve their literature. Even that can be hard to follow....and buying the chocolate and tasting it leads us to knowing which chocolate we like for what purposes.

HTH?
 
1,839
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Joined May 29, 1999
"Chocologie"
a concise vade mecum through the Chocolate Industry in Switzerland

Chcocosuisse
Union of Swiss Chocolate Manufacturers
Munzgraben 6
3000 Bern 7


Hope you can find a copy.
I got mine from
E. A Tosi and Sons Co., Inc
1-781-848-1040
But they are no longer in the distribution end of food.

W, why would a chocolate company not publish a history and use book that promotes their product?
I still have the book, and if I lived in New England I would use Tosi and sons for imports.
I would imagine yes the formula changes per batch however the principles and rules are the same.
 
1,839
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Joined May 29, 1999
Alexia,
Googled Chocologie and found it!
You can read it, download it and email them for more info. Adobe fromate on their site.
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
M, yes I've seen tons of info published on chocolate history....and chocolate types.

As I understood she understands the differences between types but wanted to know the differences and number systems wth-in specific brands of chocolate such as Callibaut who has more then one semi sweet chocolate....????I think.

Personally, I've only found that info from the manufactures (in their pamplets), I'm not familar with the books you mentioned.....but I'm interested!
 
30
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Joined Nov 3, 2002
hi,about chocolate yum yum i love chocolate always worked with chocolate,but if you want to find out from mr. chocolate him self go to his website...www.jacquestorres.com,i have worked with this guy hes alsome.He has alot of referrences on his site and you could email him too ,hes a nice guy..hope i could be a little help..hehe..bye...
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
Somebody here posted within the last year info on Callebaut's numbering system, mentioning that it all had to do with viscosity and stuff. I order chocolate one week and get 811-nv, another time I get 835, another time I get L40-60 nv. I don't know the difference either. and their web site is not much help. I can't remember who sort of inherited Tosi's business. We used to get a lot of stuff from them at Johnson and Wales. There's an outfit in I think Chelsea MA or Everett or some other scary place called Sparrow that our distributor at the club got the chocolate. I called them once and they seemed to know a lot. Maybe they have literature.
 
2,938
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Joined Mar 4, 2000
I find that the 835 is a very good all-purpose choc.

The 811 is a bit too thin for me, and the 60/40 is good for piped choc. garnishes, because it's nice and viscous.
 
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