chocolate

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by houghton, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. houghton

    houghton

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    has any ever heard of the make of chocolate called "schokinag" i find it really hard to work with . its really 'goopy'
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    German.  Usually pretty good.

    "Goopy" tells me that moisture or humidity was introduced.  Could be from working in a humid enviroment (pots bopiling near by, d/washer nearby, etc) or from a non a/c kitchen.
     
  3. houghton

    houghton

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    that would make sense as all you just said is happening.... we used to use callebaut but for some reason have changed. the callebautnever used to be like it though. could it also be because its a cheaper chocolate? and also it has lecithin in it .... is it normal?
     
  4. minas6907

    minas6907

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    It is pretty normal to have soy lecithin in chocolate, a small amount is added to increase the fluidity of the chocolate.
     
  5. dobzre

    dobzre

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    can you be more specific of "goopy" I don't know what that means.
     
  6. houghton

    houghton

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    as in when i melt it down (over bain marie off heat to no hotter than 48) that looks simalar to a slack gnache consistancy. pretty much ribbon stage. not how i think melted chocolate should look. i think chocolate should be pure no added extras. flavour is everything to me
     
  7. foodpump

    foodpump

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    From what you describe, you have moisture infected chocolate.

    Shokinag has many types of couvertures and chocolates--just as Ford or GM has many types of cars. Most, if not all European chocolate mnfctrs will state how "fluid" the chocolate is on the label of the package with the "raindrop" pictogram (1-2 drops very thick, 3 medium, 4-5 very fluid), or, failing that, state the actual cocoa butter content.

    As others have said, lecithin is added to couverture and chocolate to increase fluidity.  This is a very small amount, in between .2 and .5%, as in, a half of one percent.  There are no chocolates in the under $60/ kg ($120.00/lb) range without lecithin, as the small amount of lecithin mimics the addition of almost 10% of cocoa butter.  The super-expensive chocolates don't add in the lecithin as they charge enough to cover the cost of adding the extra cocoa butter.  

    The lecithin addition shouldn't surprise you though, as you should of learned it in school, or should have found out yourself by reading the labels of other couvertures, like Callebaut or even the drug-store chocolates, they all contain lecithin, and have done so since the early 1900's.

    Callebaut has many types of couvertures, the most popular being d8-11, followed by 60/40 and 70/30.

    Now, I need you to do a little homework, o.k.?  Google "St. Hyacinth" AND "Callebaut" in the same search, and tell me what you find.
     
  8. houghton

    houghton

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    im more than happy to research and to tell you what i find as im always up for learning. but what do you want me to tell you ?? 
     
  9. foodpump

    foodpump

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    If you do a google search with both words, the connection should be clear.
     
  10. houghton

    houghton

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    ive read/reading it now and im understanding what its saying but i dont understand the point that you are trying to say??? sorry for not understanding what you are trying to put across. the most popular thing that it is coming up with is  barry callebaut. am i on the right tracks?? it also put me into another cheftalk fourm where you also replyed to someone saying that most of callebaut comes from a plant from st.hyacinth. am i on the right track?
     
  11. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Yes.

    The plant in Quebec produces for most of N.America.  The cocoa beans come from all over the world (no cocoa does, or ever did grow in Europe...) the sugar from S. America, the plant is in Canada, and most of the milk powder is canadian.

    So what's the point?

    What's Belgian about Callebaut? Is the point.

    I other words, names don't mean much, the product itself does.

    Shokinag is a good brand, they make cheap stuff and good stuff, just as with any other mnfctr.  I was using it for years and was happy with it until my distributer started playing games with me concerning pricing and availability--nothing to do with the quality of the product itself.
     
  12. houghton

    houghton

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    okkk this topic seems to be getting abit to heated ......so il leave it with thanks for the help and advice
     
  13. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Heated?

    This is nothing.

    Check out this thread... http://www.cheftalk.com/t/71900/facial-hair-in-the-professional-kitchen

    This one has lasted a couple of years... http://www.cheftalk.com/t/61187/hollandaise-sauce-question

    Those are just two that I came up with from my own posting history and IMO are not all that bad.

    There are some that get so "heated" that the mods delete posts and issue warnings, lolol!

    I guess what I am trying to "say" is the passion displayed by many of CT's members may come across as short or grumpy or even condescending, but

    I have found, as a whole, the regular (foodpump is one) contributors to be not only knowledgeable and generous, but patient with those of us that don't "get it" right away.

    Stepping down from my soapbox now ;-)

    mimi
     
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