Chocolate and Wine pairing

Discussion in 'Pairing Food and Wine' started by aguynamedrobert, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. aguynamedrobert

    aguynamedrobert

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    Thanks for the info....that actually helps a lot...now I at least have a base of what Port is! thanks again

    Robert
    www.chocolateguild.com
     
  2. even stephen

    even stephen

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    Last night I did a pretty little course for a wine tasting.
    The wine was a pretty big merlot. I blended a little highend
    bittersweet chocolate ganache with a good quality goat cheese.
    Not to much, just enough to make the goat cheese a light
    tan. A little fresh ground black pepper. Got some Medjool
    sundried dates from california, took the pit out, opened them
    and piped the goat cheese in. Pretty darn tasty, so, yes,
    you can pare chocolate with wine. Sometimes you need to do
    it in varying degrees. I often put slivers of chocolate out in the
    wine bar here. Dates, apricots, marcona almonds, dried cherries as
    well. I have also done wine tastings followed by chocolate tastings.
     
  3. tilion

    tilion

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    I was sitting here scanning the forum with a glass of old vine Zin and some Dagobah chocodrops when I came across this thread. Yes! Good hearty reds go with good dark chocolate. At least for me. I don't like ports with dark chocolate because I think the sweetness of the port overwhelms the chocolate. But milk chocolate with an nice extra dry (not brut) champagne? mmm-mmm-good! :)
     
  4. davewest

    davewest

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    Select a Brachetto d'Acqui.

    Cool, frizzante, strawberry flavor to refresh with the chocolate.
     
  5. bluezebra

    bluezebra

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    Hi I'm new to the boards and hope you don't mind me jumping in!

    I've had a little experience with truffles and or chocolate and wine pairings. It's one of my most favorite dessert experiences. I generally serve a cheese and fruit board following it with port, cognac or spirits so like to serve the truffle course with wines.

    Some of our favorites to date (btw, the truffles are made with bittersweet chocolate using 60 and 72% chocolates). I make the truffles myself using Alice Medrich's base truffle recipe. My chocolate coatings are untempered again per AM, because of the immediate explosion on the tongue that untempered chocolate gives compared to tempered. When you combine this with a full bodied "big" red, it's pretty close to orgasmic or at least a "double moaner"! haha.

    The wines we've experimented most with are:

    California Cabs - Sinsky, Trefethen, Smith & Hook all have beautiful full bodied reds. They have a fairly fruit forward bouquet and initial mouth burst to them but there are very dark, chewy undertones, that could be a little tobacco-ish, chocolately, currant or blackberry, and even a bit of pencil shaving taste the them. The best term I can use to discribe them is "chewy". You know it when you taste it cuz it makes you want to move your lower jaw in almost a chewing motion. Hard to explain.

    Another really yummy pairing is a big full bodied devilish Zin. There are so many of these out there in various price ranges and even the Cardinal Zin and Goliath Rex work very pleasantly. I would say they tend more toward the acidic side but with the chocolate, they really highlight and bring out the sweetness of even bittersweet.

    Another favorite is a blend called a Meritage. I don't have a favorite vinyard for this. But again, it's full bodied too. Pinot Noirs are very good as well.

    I don't tend to like shiraz with this because I feel that it is too "shallow" and tannic in generally although shiraz or cab-shiraz are among my favorite wines.

    I don't often do champagne with truffles because it's too common and expected and I would rather do champagne with our appetizer courses. (Champaign and caper berries and strong aged cheeses...mmmmm, luxury!)

    Anyway, hope this helps. I'm far from a connossieur (heck I can't even spell it!) but I do have pretty pronounced personal preferences!

    Mangia!
     
  6. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I like to use white port as an alternative to tawny, ruby or other ports.
    It is great in the summer, well chilled - as an alternative to fino sherry. I like it with petit four at the end of a meal.

    One of my favourites is Taylor's Chip Dry.
    Here's the Taylor site Taylor's Port | The Home of Port
     
  7. jes888

    jes888

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    With chocolate I have found Rosa Regali a sparkling red goes very well. I have done banquets where we had a chocolate fountain and the guests were just thrilled.
     
  8. david jones

    david jones

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    Cape Chef, is it time for one of my Hippocratic rants with regard to wine pairing??? Just give the word.

    I personally love "tinkering" with chocolate and wine, because when all is said and done, you've had lots of chocolate and lots of wine.

    Rose Champagne (Billecarte-Salmon) and Cali Zin with firm tannins and great fruit are still my favorites. I hope to continue my full-scale research on this topic.
     
  9. fodigger

    fodigger

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    As with most things there are no hard and fast rules. What matters most is that you like it. With all do respect to Mr. Parker I love a Stags Leap Cab. w/ a good bittersweet chocolate.
    I also like Eagle Rare and Woodford Reseve Both really good Bourbons w/ bittersweet chocolate.
     
  10. bluezebra

    bluezebra

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    ROFL! Love IT! I think Chef Jones has definitely got it. I feel the same way!!! :D :beer:
     
  11. psycho chef

    psycho chef

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    We are serving a Valhrona chocolate souffle with a 1974 sweet Roussillon we found a case of hiding in some corner of the cellar. It is like a mellow version of port, just as sweet but not as alcoholic. It goes well with the souffle because the chocolate is lightened by the egg whites so most ports tend to overpower it(except our 1960 Dow).
     
  12. lazar89

    lazar89 Banned

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    When matching wine to chocolate the key essence in successful pairing is ensuring the sweet tastes complement each other...The darker the chocolate, the heavier the wine should be.

    Similarly the lighter the wine the more elegant the chocolate should be.

    I love pairing white chocolate with sweet dessert wines (a glass of Elysium from the Quady Winery in California for example or any select bottle from the Dolce Winery who specialize in dessert wines).

    Milk chocolate goes well with the lighter bodied reds such as merlot or pinot noir.

    When pairing dark chocolate Shiraz, Zinfandels and Cabernet Sauvignon are  excellent choices.If you want to pair the bittersweet dark chocolate - Grenache, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Ruby Ports.
     
  13. apron

    apron

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    Hello everyone, This is Apron,

           I am not really a wine drinker but do like white wine or champagne.  I do like chocolate and tend to go for the dark type of chocolate.  I believe dark chocolate is the best health wise whereas white is rather like a fat, milk chocolate is not really chocolate.  There was I believe a war over chocolate with foreign countries as to the fact that British chocolate was not being given to the public properly as it was not proper chocolate but that France and Germany were giving their public proper chocolate and they told the British to stop cheating the British public.  I love German chocolate, and Austrian is my favourite.  Red wine is very good for people I believe.  I believe it has to be a certain number to be a good one.  My step father used to tell me this.  May I ask which countries chocolate would you consume and why?  Also which countries wine would you consume and why? 
     
  14. abefroman

    abefroman

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    Try to do opposites, for example if you have a high cocao content South American chocolate, pair it with a sweeter wine, or where if you have a sweeter Belgian chocolate pair it with a dryer wine.

    Sparkling wines go really well, as well as old world wines.
     
  15. midlife

    midlife

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    >>"Red wine is very good for people I believe. I believe it has to be a certain number to be a good one."
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2016
  16. foodieforlife36

    foodieforlife36

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    Ugh this would be my favorite thread! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/laser.gif
     
  17. eastpakhammer

    eastpakhammer

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    Typically you match with Dark chocolate, milk chocolate doesn't compliment the wine too well.
    Dark chcolate and ginger is a perfect blend to match with the likes of a bold Merlot or Rioja. The fruity taste compliments the sharp bitterness of the dark chocolate
     
  18. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    Pairing red wines with chocolate is like pairing a novice rider with a skiddish horse.  The two almost never work well together and there is a reason for that.  The tannins and sugar of the chocolate wage a war with the tannins and alcohol of the wine.  The only casualties are your taste buds, your wallet and in some cases, your reputation. 

    We all have different tastes and preferences.  In recognition of that fact, it is not my intent to malign those who like red wine and chocolate.  Some actually like the dissonance created by red wine and chocolate.  However, in my experience, there are far more who do not like the pairing of red wine and chocolate than there are those who like it.  The two together are most definitely an acquired taste. Like one commenter said, red wine and chocolate creates the "toothpaste orange juice syndrome."  

    Here is the inherent problem with red wine and chocolate. 

    Fantastic chocolates and fantastic red wines are fantastic for the same reason:  their tannins.  In the world of food and wine pairing, tannin + tannin = bad.  Tannin + fat = good (hence, the sublime glory of fatty foods, such as whipped cream, with chocolate or a big red wine with an excellent steak).  But, when the tannins that make each of these culinary delights so wonderful clash, the result is almost always a negative experience.  Throw in the chaos created by alcohol, who owes no debt of loyalty to either the wine or the chocolate, and the experience will almost certainly go sideways.  The true tragedy here is the taster will almost certainly miss out on the true beauty of the red wine or the decadent seduction of the chocolate.  Rarely, if ever, will they have both. 

    The general rule is pair chocolate with dessert wines that are just as sweet or sweeter than the chocolate.  Dessert wines typically have "soft" tannins accompanied by moderate to high acidity and high sugar content.  The acidity (and alcohol) prevents the wine from tasting like syrup.  Meanwhile, the sugar tends to disarm the higher alcohol content of the dessert wine. 

    The marriage of dessert wines and chocolate can be a truly bewitching experience, when done right.  The choice of dessert wines and chocolates is a matter of preference, as is 99% of the art of wine pairing.  If you do not have the experience, there are many people and resources out there that can point you in the right direction given the dynamics at play such as budget, experience of the tasters, vintage availability, types of chocolates and so on.   
     
  19. mikki donaldson

    mikki donaldson

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    Oh wow... I never knew this!  I also thought the two were the perfect pair. :(  Goodness.  Now I know that I should use a dessert wine instead of just any bottle of red wine.  This makes me happy.  Now that I have the time to cook and to read, I expect I will learn a lot more useful information like this.  thanks so much! 
     
  20. steve tphc

    steve tphc

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    I actually love quality chocolate with a fruit-forward jubilant red wine. If I was wealthy, the wine would be a Pommard. As far as chocolate, I adore See's.