Chocolate and Wine pairing

Discussion in 'Pairing Food and Wine' started by aguynamedrobert, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. aguynamedrobert

    aguynamedrobert

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    Has anyone done any wine and chocolate Pairing before? I work with chocolate but am not very into wine....although I would love to work with a sommelier to pair them one time and get a feel for the two working together....has anyone done this yet?

    -Robert
    www.chocolateguild.com/vb
     
  2. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Strictly talking about dessert wines, Port, whether vintage, Tawney or Ruby as well as LBV's work beautifully with chocolate. Also Madeira's. The key to the match up is the type of chocolate that's highlighted. Bittersweet, unsweetened, semisweet, white, milk etc. All these chocolates offer different levels of bitterness and tannins. I recommend doing a tasting. With that said, many dry reds go with chocolate, but this becomes a bit more of a challenge. Complete contrasts work well when really thought out. Example, Port with Stilton, Sauterne with Foie gras. Here we match savory, fatty and salty with sweet. Probably the most important thing to keep in mind is that the wine HAS to be as sweet or sweeter than the chocolate or you have the toothpaste orange juice syndrome.
     
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  3. castironchef

    castironchef

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    I'm rather partial to a nice tannic cabernet with chocolate.
     
  4. cape chef

    cape chef

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    What attributes do you find coalesce with a big tannic Cabernet and chocolate? Also, what type of chocolate (not brand) are you eating with the wine?
     
  5. castironchef

    castironchef

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    I, regrettably, don't have the talent of writing about or describing tastes, especially when it comes to wine. I am not one of those tasters who can describe "cola, winter melon, fig, etc." when tasting wine. I taste wine, not those other things (with minor exceptions).

    When it comes to chocolate, I prefer dark/bittersweet. Thus, I prefer a stronger, more full bodied wine to compliment it.

    To me, neither the dark chocolate nor the tannic red wash each other out, as it would with either milk chocolate or a light, fruity red. Further, while both have strong flavors, they seem to "reset" my taste buds, making the next taste of the other one "fresh."

    I hope that the above makes sense.
     
  6. aguynamedrobert

    aguynamedrobert

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    I see that a few of you have a good amount of knowledge when it comes to pairing specific wines with chocolate(In the broad terms of chocolate). Has anyone Paired certain wines with chocolate from different origins around the world? Actually paired the unique flavors of those chocolates with the wines? Just throwing it out there because it has not been done much yet...

    Robert
    www.chocolateguild.com
     
  7. aprilb

    aprilb

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    I'm not a professional wine sniffer by any means but I know what I like. :beer: :lips: :crazy:

    They have a fine selection of very dark bodied wines as well as Cabs that are great. Certain Aussie Pinot Noir's and Yellowtail Shiraz both hold their own against other strong flavors. I don't know of the Pinot but I know there are a few available here that have a nice fruit undertone.

    The shiraz is great but it also has a strong chocolate undertone of its own. (depending on the year)

    I like a burgundy for drinking but really dislike the "thin" tart types. (my tastebud definition...)

    I think the idea of pairing wine with chocolate is on the surface odd, but makes tons of sense. How many gourmet gift baskets do you see with truffles, chocolate covered fruit and bottles of fine wine? Heaps.

    Anyway...this is an interesting question.

    April
     
  8. m brown

    m brown

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    champagne and truffles= wonderful:smiles:

    cab sav and medium dark chocolate = heaven:roll:

    port and 72 % dark chocolate= omg:crazy:

    don't forget truffle fudge brownies and scotch = there are no words:D

    raspberry double chocolate chip cookie and rose champagne = get out of jail free card:bounce:

    milk chocolate and iced vodka = ohh:lips:
    vodka cuts the sweet and fat... just for fun, like an interactive chocolate martini :smokin

    so, yeah, chocolate and wine/spirits they kind of can work :eek:
     
  9. myplaceoryours

    myplaceoryours

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    I'd like to pair a Vin Santo (a dessert wine) with dark chocolate.
     
  10. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Rosa Regale (used to be Barchetto di Aqui) from Banfi is a fantastic sparkling that goes superb with chocolate.
     
  11. m brown

    m brown

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    I am a lucky girl, Banfi is right down the steet and I have had the pleasure of cooking there, touring and tasting.
    The rosa regale is wonderful and really festive with the desserts. At our truffle and champagne tasting we always offered it and it always was a hit!:bounce:
     
  12. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Well, I no longer like you!! :eek: Delaware has very tight controls over the quantity of specific brand imports... and Banfi has a very, very small limit. As such, Rosa Regale is nearly impossible to get. Next time you go there, perhaps you could send me a cork or the label from the bottle!
     
  13. ted hudgins

    ted hudgins

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    I've had some interesting attempts at matching red wine & chocolate with varying degrees of success. Port is good, depending on the type of port and the chocolate, as Cape alluded to. Robert Parker has gone on record (and I agree) that the only wine to go with chocolate is a late harvest grenache from Southwest France called Banyuls.

    On a related note, I have enjoyed Mole Poblano and big, powerful zinfandels on a number of occcasions.
     
  14. culprit

    culprit

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    Because pairing "wine" with "chocolate" involves mating a wide range of wine with a wide range of chocolate (there are countless combinations) this can get pretty complicated. This web site:

    http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/mai...ine2.asp#chart

    includes a guide that I sometimes use when I'm uncertain. It may help answer your question(s)
     
  15. myron

    myron

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    I understand that your question deals with pairing wine and chocolate but I would like to add a bit of a twist for you to consider. Dark chocolate pairs beautifully with good Scotch whiskey (Johnny Walker Black Label or, if you're feeling a bit full in the wallet, Johnny Walker Blue Label would be my first two choices) Because it is a liqueur based on a Scotch whiskey foundation, you might also want to consider Drambuie with dark chocolate.
    There are other liquor and liqueur considerations (e.g Southern Comfort) but those I've listed here are some of my favorites.
     
  16. jenyfari

    jenyfari

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    I am by no means an expert but I know what I like and I like a good port with my chocolate.
     
  17. someday

    someday

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    I second that a nice big Zin is a great pairing for chocolate.
     
  18. monk

    monk

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    I have not been able to match a red wine (dry or sweet) to chocolate that has not been other than 'OK'. I tend to match chocolate to a tawny port, or, as others have listed, distilled spirits. My science background makes me propose that our preferences are affected by how our palates integrate red wine tannins with a given chocolate formulation - the match is not a good one for me - one overwhelms the other. Nonetheless, a good topic for a research grant?!??
     
  19. aguynamedrobert

    aguynamedrobert

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    I am actually doing a chocolate tasting for a food group in Sacramento this next month and the operator of the group wanted to do a Chocolate and Port pairing...so thanks for the port suggestion...

    Could someone please describe to me what type of alcohol Port is...Bascially, what makes Port Port and how many different kinds are there?

    Thanks All,
    Robert
    www.chocolateguild.com
     
  20. monk

    monk

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    Hello Robert -
    Directly, a good source on things Port and wine like is the 'Wine Bible', by Karen McNeil. A reasonably priced paperback that is an excellent reference. The following paragraph is from Wikipedia:
    Port is produced from grapes grown and processed in the Douro region (of Portugal), the wine produced is then fortified with the addition of distilled grape spirits in order to boost the alcohol content. The wine is then stored and aged, often barrels stored in caves (Portuguese meaning "cellars") as is the case in Vila Nova de Gaia, before being bottled. The wine received its name, "Port" in the latter half of the 17th century from the seaport city of Porto at the mouth of the Douro River, where much of the product was brought to market or for export to other countries in Europe from the Leixões docks. The Douro valley where Port wine is produced was defined and established as a protected region, or appellation in 1756 — thus making it the oldest defined and protected wine region in the world.
    (The addition of spirits stops fermentation, so ther is 'lots' of residual sugar left in the port - hence the sweetness and ability to long age.)
    Port comes in varied types, of varied quality. Ruby Port is very sweet, and not complex in flavor. Next up is Port, and it can be Late Bottled (meaning it stayed in barrel longer than usual), simply Port, or Vintage Port (the producers have declared that vintage is especially noteworthy.) All are very complex and rich in flavors - vintage stuff needs long ageing. If one leaves the port in barrel a 'long' time (10, 20, 30 years plus), you get tawny port - all the red colors have been 'bleached' out by the barrel. Red ports are full of fruit flavors, while tawny's are nutty and not very fruity. I lova them all, save the Ruby. I hope this helps!