Chinese cooking???

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by nice95gle, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. nice95gle

    nice95gle

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    Hey everyone, I wanted to start learning all I can about Chinese cooking. I figure until I can take about 5-10 year and go to China and learn with the greats I need to start somewhere. My question is what is a good starting point (books, classes, videos, etc...)? Any recommended media would be highly appreciated.
     
  2. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Chinese cooking is based a lot on techniques. You should read all you can on these. there is a book that was out but I do not know if it is still in print its called "The Heritage of Chinese Cooking" by Elizabeth Chong its a good book on the begininngs of Chinese cusine.
     
  3. steve a

    steve a

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    I've always been partial to Martin Yan. His books aren't just recipes, they're encyclopedias and informing.

    As cakerookie said, it's based on techniques, but let me add this, also a LOT of prep. Chinese food is a quick sell normally because of that.

    Some of my favs besides Yan include:
    Southeast Asian Specialties, Ed: Rosalind Mowe;
    The Complete Book of Pasta and Noodles, by the Editor's of Cook's Illustrated;
    Blue Ginger, Ming Tsai;
    Noodle Shop Cookbook, Jackie Passmore;
    Essentials of Asian Cuisine, Corinne Trang;
    The Food of Asia, Kong Foong Ling;
    The Practical Encyclopedia of Asian Cooking, Sallie Morris and Deh-Ta Hsiung;
    Hot Sour Salty Sweet and Seductions of Rice, Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid

    While these are not all Chinese, they all relate in one form or another.

    Ciao,
     
  4. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Actually when it comes to Asian cusine most of it is basically along the same lines has far techniques are concerned. The Chinese as well as the Japanese adhere strictly to ancient techniques and flavors that are more traditional in these types of cusine. You will hear a lot about Neo Japanese and things like that which means basically that the newer upcoming generation of Japanese chefs are veering away from the traditional flavors and trying other avenues.There is a strict code in Chinese cusine among the chefs. You will find that alot of the techniques that will be taught are of ancient traditional origins. Thats really what I like about this type of cusine it adheres to traditional and more well known flavors... SteveA is right Martin Yan is good and his lists is also good too..............
     
  5. nice95gle

    nice95gle

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    Thank you everyone,

    I will look at all the books that was mentions. Cakerookie you are right I am trying to get into the more traditional stuff. Also I will look for "The Heritage of Chinese Cooking", if I can't find it I will take you up on your offer.
     
  6. someday

    someday

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    Aldo check out a chef named Susur Lee...he does french/chinese fusion with amazing results. He has restaurants in Toronto and has a bio/cookbook out.

    It's actually really amazing I highly recommend it.
     
  7. steve a

    steve a

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    Susur Lee is a 'sort of' running mate of Ming Tsai. Both well respected.

    Ciao,
     
  8. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Both are great Chefs for Chinese cusine. I liked Ming Tsai shows on Food Network East meets West.
     
  9. suzychef

    suzychef

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    I bought a cookbook from a guy who used to have a chinese school in Chicago.

    It's an e-book that can be found at http://www.Wokfusion.com

    Not sure if it's great for beginner's, but it's got lots of easy recipes in it.
     
  10. mudbug

    mudbug

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    The Key to Chinese Cooking by Irene Kuo is excellent for beginners. It is often recommended for any Chinese cookbook library as a necessary staple. It teaches the fundemental techniques and lays a foundation with authentic recipes. I highly recommend it.

    http://www.google.com/search?num=100...ng&btnG=Search