Chiken Stock

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by surfcast, May 13, 2017.

  1. surfcast

    surfcast

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    When making fresh chicken stock ,is a good idea to remove all skin from the chicken ? Prior to cooking,

    or do you lose flavor ?? I know you have skim all of it out, as it raise's to the top. Just thinking, it can save some work.
     
  2. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Go ahead and remove the fat. You can always render it down if you want to use the fat for something else but it won't help the stock.
     
  3. someday

    someday

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    It probably doesn't matter much. You'll almost all of the fat once the stock cools and you can pull off the fat "lid" that separates off. As long as you don't boil your broth, you should be fine. 

    Just FYI, a stock is made with bones (or at least mostly bones) and a broth is made with meat (or mostly meat). Stocks tend to have much less flavor but more gelatin, and broth the opposite. If you are using meat that you have to remove skin from, you are most likely making a broth. Nothing wrong with that, just wanted to help clarify your terminology. 

    Bone broth is just stock for hipsters, if you ever encounter that. 
     
  4. surfcast

    surfcast

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    Thanks for the above replies , I know what you mean with the bones. Even chicken backs, have along strip of skin on the back. And the tail section, I find is all skin and fat as well .

    What do you mean, buy do not boil the broth ? The way I do it, I start with cold water, add my chicken parts. Set a medium flame skim as necessary, as soon as I have a boil, I set it low and keep skimming.

    How long to you let he stock cook before straining? 
     
  5. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Don't have a boil. Get it to a simmer. 

    How long to cook depends. Cooking a whole chicken with meat intact can be cooked just until the meat can be removed. You should have a flavorful liquid at that point. If you like, put the bones back in and cook longer. 

    Try making some without the meat, just bones. Cook it for the same time you cooked the first one. See what the difference is. 

    Just bones will take a bit longer but as it cooks, remove some to a small cup. Taste it. If you like it, it's done. If it isn't very strong, let it cook some more. When the liquid has reached the flavor strength you like, it's done. 

    Cooking several batches in different ways will show you what each is like and you can get a better idea of your preferences. 
     
  6. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I agree with the no boil method. I steep my stocks at about 185- 190 F for hours, perhaps days depending on what I am making.

    mjb.