Cherry flavor that does not curdle in buttercream?

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by Baker Beach, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. Baker Beach

    Baker Beach

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    Anyone have a recommendation on a cherry flavor that will not curdle a custard-based buttercream? So far I have tried the cherry syrups used in coffee shops as well as maraschino cherry juice with no luck. I could switch to IMBC, but for this particular recipe I'd like to keep to the custard-based if I can. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    This

    cherry flavouring.jpg
     
  3. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Actually, Dreidoppel makes some of the best flavoring concentrates around. They are intensely flavored and a little goes
    a long way: http://www.pastrychef.com/DREIDOPPEL-FLAVORING-PASTES--CHERRY_p_2274.html

    It's always best as far as buttercreams are concerned, to use as little liquid based flavoring as possible. Liquid based flavorings and extracts aren't particularly strong and you have to use more of it. That's what makes it "curdle". You need to look for concentrates or powders. I used to use a freeze dried marionberry product from Oregon that I absolutely loved. I also love all Dreidoppel and Hero concentrates. They can be found online or through specialty bakery suppliers locally. I have also made my own "concentrates" by cooking down fruits. I've done this with raspberries, blueberries, strawberries and cherries. I just simmer them on very low heat for an extended period of time til they are very thick and concentrated. Then I'll run the cooled concentrate through a food processor and press it through a sieve if there are seeds involved, like for raspberries. Hope that helps.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2018
  4. Baker Beach

    Baker Beach

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  5. Baker Beach

    Baker Beach

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    Thank you! Haven't seen the cherry in stores here, but will keep looking.
     
  6. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    @Baker Beach, I added some more info to my answer above that may also help you.
     
  7. Baker Beach

    Baker Beach

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    That actually helps a lot!! I make a strawberry concentrate that works very well and it didn't register that I could do the same with cherries! Duh! I'll try that before purchasing anything new and if I can't get good results I now have two resources for frozen or dried products. Thank you so much!
     
  8. jcakes

    jcakes

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    You can also take a page out of RLB's Cake Bible and thaw frozen fruit, reserving the juices and then reducing the juices and pureeing the fruit, then pressing the solids through a strainer. I used to do this until the demand for strawberry and raspberry puree was more than I could manage; for these, and some other flavors, like passionfruit, I use Boiron, and Pontheir brands. Both of these are excellent quality and worth the price if you have a distributor in your area. If the pastrychefcentral site isn't worth the shipping expense, you might be able to find Amoretti brand concentrates on Amazon. They used to sell only the to trade but last year they started making smaller sizes and selling on Amazon so maybe they'd even be available through AmazonPrime.
     
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  9. fatcook

    fatcook

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    We also make our own concentrates from frozen fruit. We cook down the fruits and juice that comes out as they thaw, then puree as needed and sieve.

    We purchase most of the fruits fresh and freeze on trays so that we can pull the amount needed. Freezing not only helps with keeping the fruit on hand year round, but breaks down the cell walls making the puree and cooking processes easier.
     
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  10. Baker Beach

    Baker Beach

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    I definitely will try my hand at making cherry concentrate from frozen cherries-- I do it with strawberry (the idea was from the Cake Bible-- great minds!) so cherry should not be a problem at all. And I have checked out the sources mentioned and may try them as well for comparison. Thank you all so much for responding-- I am fairly new to the business and am still developing recipes so, I really appreciate the advice!
     
  11. panini

    panini

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    Just me, but if I were using a custard base or any buttercream I shy away from concentrates or suspended flavors. They just don't ever seem to reach that homogeneous blend. My taste buds can identify the product and the butter separately. I almost always use a compound or sometimes a paste. Just sayin
     
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  12. harpua

    harpua

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    I agree with Panini. It gets weird. Try to find some sort of specialty paste made for this purpose. Or perhaps find the freeze dried fruit powder. Never seen a cherry flavor, though. I don’t really try to flavor things with cherry unless it’s just a load of fresh cherries in something. The flavor just doesn’t come through.