Chefs, Cooks and foot problems

Discussion in 'The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)' started by pastachef, Mar 19, 2001.

  1. pastachef

    pastachef

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    In the ten years I have been cooking for a living I have developed multiple foot problems. Someone told me that in this profession the feet are the first thing to go. I was wondering if any of you have experienced this problem aside from the usual weary, aching and tired feet.
     
  2. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I just had my second surgery for bunions, back in Feb. They would have happened anyway, but work definitely made them worse. I'm really glad I had the surgery, but it was 6 weeks out of work for each foot.
     
  3. chrose

    chrose

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    Plantar Fascitis in both feet and a torn plantar ligament from basketball but due to an weakened, inflamed ligament from the fascitis. Ahh what the **** I'm falling apart as my friends on this site can attest to! :rolleyes:
     
  4. snakelady1

    snakelady1

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    After spending an 8 hour shift standing at the end of a buffet line carving beef I developed bone spurs on both heels. A great podiatrist and orthotics have made it possible for me to work long shifts without pain. 6 years with the same pair of orthotics money well spent( $300 for the pair) and still going strong
     
  5. layjo

    layjo

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    Sorry yall are experiencing foot pains! Me, myself, I have only had problems when wearing a new pair of shoes for about the first few weeks. Then they feel comfortable. I like to wear socks that have thicker material on the bottom, they aid in my comfort.
     
  6. greg

    greg

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    A broken bone in my ankle from a slip and fall in a mat-less kitchen. FOH managers were responsible for ordering cleaning supplies; guess they didn't think de-greaser all that important. It has never really completely healed; now I can tell when it's going to rain!
     
  7. lorib

    lorib

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    Oh boy - can I ever relate to this thread! (Bunions (ouch! momo- would like to know about your surgery, I'm scared) , plantar fasciitis, broken toe that doesn't want to heal. Misery loves company! I heard from another chef that the orthotics never worked for her - so never wanted to spend that much money - would be curious to hear from others on this investment.
     
  8. pastachef

    pastachef

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    I can empathize with all of you. LoriB, I finally got orthotics myself. At first, I didn't think they were helping, but when I tried to take them out of my shoes it was impossible to walk by mid-morning. So they do help some. Depending upon what your foot problem is, they could help a lot. When I went to work at the University I quickly found out that I was born with short bones I my feet. While I did the housewife/mommie thing I could sit down when my feet hurt, and I thought the pain was normal from being so busy. Working is another thing though. Now I'm rarely pain free without orthotics and Ultram. I hope all of you have found relief in some way. :eek:
     
  9. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Well, LoriB, I was one of those freaks of nature that had bunions, not only on the instep, but on the outstep too. Last year, I found a surgeon who was only willing to do 1 foot at a time, and he did not think my outer bunions were causing me enough pain to operate. I should've found a new Dr. at that point. But I let him do his thing, leaving me with three. The next year, I found a Dr. who would remove the remaining 3, which meant I'd be in a wheelchair for 3 weeks. I wish I had just done all 4 the first time, and not gone with the first surgeon. As long as you have someone (like my wonderful husband), who can wait on you for the 1st 3 days or so, the rest of it is not too bad. They gave me percocet, which I took for 2 days. My feet look nice, and the scarring is barely visible. In the end, they aren't free from pain between the metatarsals, but it's much better than before.

    PS- The first surgeon placed a permanent metal screw into my bone, which I can still feel a year later. The 2nd guy used dissolvable pins, and I have no idea where the cuts in the bone were. So I would say no to permanent metal in the feet.
     
  10. campchef

    campchef

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    Both knees blown out from college basketball, bad back from growing up on a farm, so now I HAVE to take care of my feet. My solution is GOOD clogs. I no longer have sore feet, knees and back at the end of another 14 hour day. They take a few days to get used to, but what a differnce they make. The bonus is, the good ones have non-slip soles. Now I don't have to worry about sliding on wet or greasy floors, I don't even walk carefully on them any more. Bottom Line, get some good shoes, NOW!
     
  11. theloggg

    theloggg

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    funny this topic came up today. last night while playing basketball I came down hard on my left foot and tweaked my arch. I'm currently icing it under my desk (fortunately I'm not on my feet all the time yet). Makes me think about the sacrifices I may have to make down the road. I can't afford to hurt my feet when I'm in school or cooking full time.
     
  12. snakelady1

    snakelady1

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    My orthotics have worked great for 6 years haven't had to replace them If I go for even one day of standing without them my feet hurt alot. The thing about bone spurs was in the morning I couldn't even walk and I thought to myself if there was a fire in my home I wouldn't be able to save myself let alone my three children thats when I went and got help. Good shoes are essential.
     
  13. anneke

    anneke

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    My feet a pretty much a disaster too from having done classical ballet for 20 years. I know about bunions; my sympathy to all of you afflicted with the lovely extra curves! I've also suffered from tendonitis, knee problems, stress fractures and now I'm starting to think I've developed some kind of arthritis from snapping my hips before every ballet class. Needless to say, my ballet days are gone!

    I first realised the importance of good shoes when I was in Wales 6 years ago. I bought a pair of hiking shoes made for the British foot (supposedly wider). I travelled across Europe with them, did some pretty trecherous hiking, wore them in the city too. I became addicted to them. I could walk 8-10 hours on them and not get tired.

    So I agree with those above who say get good shoes now. I've been putting off getting some good orthos for my non-slip steel-toes (which I love!). THis thread is a good reminder! ;) When I'm at work I'm often on my feet for 10 hours straight without a break. When I can get 1-2 minutes, I try to do some stretching, especially for my back, hamstrings and achilles. My co-workers think I'm a freak, but it really helps to relieve the tension that you build up during your shift. Regular stretching can really help to realign everything and mild injuries heal much faster. If your prone to getting headaches in a hot kitchen, it helps as well.
     
  14. pastachef

    pastachef

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    My podiatrist told me to always wear cross trainers or running shoes and to avoid walking shoes for my problems. I was born having a couple of bones in both feet that were too short. I have constant pain with tendonitis, metatarsalgia, Morton's neuroma, and a large mass in the middle of an arch, both of which have fallen. Now my doctor says my ankles are going on me :( I am interested in what clogs do for cooks. What do they do for the feet? Don't they make you clumsy when flying around the kitchen? I've heard about the clogs several times and from several sources, but never kound out why they are supposed to be so good. Now my podiatrist believes I have peripheral neuropathy from a back problem. But my back hurts nowhere nearly as much as my feet.
     
  15. marzoli

    marzoli

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    My classroom has a concrete floor and I used to wear cross trainers all the time because of sore feet, legs, and back. Then the school made a rule: no tennis shoes for teachers. So I got Dr. Martins! They work as well for me if I get the lace up oxford and put in the insole to snug up the fit--British sizes are awful! So far, the powers that be haven't complained. I guess they think I just have big feet and wear men's shoes. :D The Docs last through an entire school year--they look pretty rough, but since kids walk all over my feet in the hallway all day, I guess that doesn't matter. I noticed that Rick Bayliss had on what looked like Docs in the cover photo on one of his books.
     
  16. w.debord

    w.debord

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    My two solutions...

    1. Change shoes 1/2 way thru the day, my feet feel refreshed just changing them. I've never found one perfect pair of shoes...except if I think about it I have custom made foot beds in my ski boots and I can stand in them all day with-out foot problems.

    2.This is gross, but...I rest one foot on the bottom shelf of my table while I stand on the other and rotate thru out the day as much as possible. So each foot gets a rest now and then. I do wash the bottom part of the table throughly and don't ever store food that could contact it directly. :eek:
     
  17. campchef

    campchef

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    A couple of answers and thoughts concerning clogs. I've worn them for almost 15 years, and found that they vary widely by brand and materials. I started with a pair of Danskos with backs, and after cracking the soles on three pairs in two years, decided they weren't for me even though they felt great. They use a poly sole. I'm a big guy (6'3" 240) so shoes need to be exceptionally durable. I then tried Birkenstocks with the same results, they either ripped out or broke. I then found the most durable comfortable clogs ever made: Bastad from Sweden. The soles are alderwood with a nonslip bottom, and they last forever. I don't get the ones with backs, because once you get used to the clogs, the backs are just there for looks anyway. A bonus, at the end of the day, while mopping the floor, I just mop my shoes, too. In reference to walking funny or running out of them, I never have done either. I can do a pretty much dead sprint after my kids through grass, although running over gravel is a bit hazardous. The only problem I have, is that Bastad soles are rather high, so with shoes and toque, I'm a little over 7' tall. So I have been on the search for a clog with all the characteristics of Bastad, but a little lower. But so far no luck. I highly recommend clogs for the kitchen, they make you feel so good!
     
  18. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    CampChef, I have to agree about the Bastads. I wore out about 5 pairs during my teaching years. Then, for some reason, I quit wearing them and started wearing 'lady' shoes (heels). My arches fell and I have bunions now. I also have had 2 cortisone injections for plantar fasciitus (extremely painful, but effective). Now I wear Merrill clog-type shoes made for snow. I took out their insole and added a gel insole and arch support. They work great for walking, but not so good for standing. Maybe it's time to revisit the Bastads!
     
  19. marzoli

    marzoli

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    After all the talk about feet and clogs--and a serious backache--I went out and bought a pair of Doc Marten clogs. Exit bachache! :D
     
  20. linda smith

    linda smith

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    Has anyone out there tried reflexolgy? Most major ballet companies have a reflexologist on staff. If it works for them it works for us. I go regularly and it is great - 45 minutes of quiet relaxation while someone rubs your feet.