Chef Tattoos

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by mikeenplace, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. mikeenplace

    mikeenplace

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    I wear my heart on my sleeve, literally. Going to be getting my next tattoo soon, first cooking related ink. Cooks are a strange breed and I'm a creature with a thirst and hunger for knowledge. What culinary tattoos to you have?
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    None.

    Most of the Chefs I know and respect don't have any either.
     
  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    None.

    My canvas is the plate.
     
     
  4. pancake house

    pancake house

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    I have one cooking related tattoo, an hourglass on the inside of my right arm. High enough my sleeve protects and hides.

    My first business was a pizzeria next door to a tattoo parlour, and I became friends with the guy. His wife was addicted to the hot sauce I made, and bartered me a tattoo for a batch of sauces as a Christmas present to her. 2.5 hours of my time for 2.5 of his.
     
  5. michaelga

    michaelga

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    None... it's a fad, just like mohawks, muscle shirts, mustaches and mullets.  

    All are easily changeable except a tatoo.

    If you have to think about what you want to permanently put on your skin you probably don't really want it there ...
     
  6. iceman

    iceman

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    A tattoo is what it is ... a statement.  If it makes you happy, then you're happy.  NO problemmo.  Many, many chefs have tattoos.  Does it make them any more or less better?  As chefs ... I can't see how.  Are they happy ... you'd have to ask them.  I really can't see any problem being happy.  I know some of the big-named people on TV are somewhat proud of themselves and their tattoos.  Michael Symon comes to mind. 


    I'm not going to blow any smoke at anyone claiming that better/good/great chefs need to have any tattoos.  I will though say that I don't think that there is any relationship between tattoos and skill.  If you want one ... get one.  If you don't want any ... don't get any. 

    We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery. 
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2013
    jaredstone likes this.
  7. just jim

    just jim

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    I have 3, all on my right arm.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  8. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Makes too much sense. That the best ya got? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
  9. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    ±Not for nothing, but Michael simon looks like a complete moron in that picture. You know who he reminds me of?

    member Schlitze from the movie "freaks"?

     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  10. trissynashville

    trissynashville

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    I've seen cook free or die.

    Tats aren't a fad that's going to fade, by the way. People said the same thing about ear piercings, women wearing pants, etc. Tats have been around for a LONG time, and have more recently gotten more popular/acceptable in western society, which is cool. 

    I've known many a good chef that was heavily tatted, some of my best hires have been guys with ink. Like Iceman said, it has nothing to do with your ability to work in a kitchen.
     
  11. kostendorf

    kostendorf

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    hey iceman great to see the black hawks on a roll.  i work the salzburg redbull ice hockey team in salzburg.  we are in the playoffs here and game 6 at home tomorow.  i can feel it.
     
  12. kostendorf

    kostendorf

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    now i understand the handel Iceman
     
  13. foodpump

    foodpump

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    No... you're right, tats have been around for a few centuries--it's just that visible tats were not socially accepted.

    One of my favorite books in "the throne room" is a circa 1910 reprint of a "saloon and hotel supplies".  Among the manualy operated ice cutting machine and bar mounted cigarette lighers that used gasoline and 12 volt electrical system, is, close to thirty pages of spitoon and cuspidor models.  I forget which is specifically made for floors, and which is for tabletops.  I'm left to assume that spitting and horking in public was socially accepted up until about the 1940's. Then again, I do know for a fact that it was socially accepted that women were incapable of voting (or holding public office, for that matter) up until the--what--1920's?

    What is accepted now, might not be accepted in 10 or 20 years from now....
     
  14. iceman

    iceman

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    Actually NO, it's really got nothing to do with hockey.  But I can understand why you would think that it does.  "Iceman" was my call-name when I was in the NAVY.  It was, LOL, before the movie. 
    "Socially accepted" is an interesting idea.  It's accepted or not, depending on which side of the glass you are looking at it from, and the color of glass you are looking through.  Because something is not acceptable to You, please do not think that you are speaking for all of society.   Society is considerably elastic; bendy, stretchy, twisty and very flexible.   The view of the world can be very different depending on from where you are looking. 
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013
  15. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    And in the food service game, the view of the majority of the customers sometimes overrides the views of the chef /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
     
  16. iceman

    iceman

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    Who's "majority of customers"?!?   Just because the majority of YOUR customers maybe don't like tattoos, and maybe some other chef's customers might not like them doesn't mean anything whatsoever about the majority of customers somewhere else after that.   Do you actually go out and ask the majority of your customers what they think about tattoos ... or do you leave them be, and project your opinion on what you think they will feel?!?   Just maybe they really don't care a rat's tail bit about whether their chef has any body art ... and are only concerned about how good the dish is that they will hopefully be enjoying, and then paying for. 
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013
  17. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Mmmm.. what was the Navy's opinion of visible tats?  On officers?
     
  18. squirrelrj

    squirrelrj Banned

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    Don't know about officers, but no tattoo's on head/neck/face in the Navy.
     
  19. iceman

    iceman

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    Hey Squirrel, 

    Are you a armed forces veteran?  I don't think I could name more than a dozen guys I knew that didn't have a tattoo, officers included.  NO, I don't remember any neck or face tattoos, but lots of arms and chests.  Tattoos have nothing to do in any way with quality of work performed, or services provided. 
     
  20. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Fair enough.  I don't think any employer--myself included--cares-or should care- about what's under normal working clothes.  It's the visible tats that are really concerning.